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^f^t College #reetingsi 

€]| The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 

€]| Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnse. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

€|I Subscriptions, ^^i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
tjf Entered at Jacksonville Postofl&ce as second class matter. 



Contents 

Editorial • .3 

Opening Chapel 5 

Picnicking 5 

Fairy Star 6 

On Opening a Truuk 10 

To a Caterpillar 10 

The Sunbeam 11 

The Twenty-fifth lyink 11 

'"Twas Brillig" 14 

Swimming • . . 16 

Y. W. C. A. Notes 16 

Some 1913 Y. W. C. A 17 

Atheletic Association 18 

Alumnse Notes 18 

CoUige of Music 21 

The Artist's Course 22 

The College Calender 22 

Society Notes 23 

Faculty Notes 24 



f^ c: o 5^ p- 
6 i J 



OLD OCTOBER 

I love old October so, 
I can't bear to see her go- 
Seems to me like losing some 
Old-home relative or chum- 
'Pears like sorto' settin* by 
Some old friend 'at sigh by sigh 
Was a passin' out o' sight 
Into everlastin' night! 
Hickernuts a feller hears 
Rattlin' down is more like tears 
Droppin' on the leaves below- 
I love Old October so' 

—Riley 



J 



^be College (3reettnQ6 

Vol. XVII Jacksonville, 111., October, 191 3 No i 



FACUI.TY Committee— Miss Mothershead, Miss Baker, Miss 

Johnston. 
Editor -Abbie Peavoy 

Associate Editors— Erma Elliott, Helena Munson, Helen McGbee 
Business Managers — Geneva Upp, Winifred Burmeister, Alma 

Harmel 



When the college doors swing open to receive us 
into her busy arms, it is necessary for us to leave behind 
many of vacation ways and manners. No longer is the 
easy languor of a pleasant vacation day in harmony with 
the busy first days of college. The laziness of a summer 
afternoon has no place in the bustle of college life. The 
carefreeriess of irresponsibility must take its flight when 
duties are placed upon us. The do-as-you-please days 
give way to the days of do as time and judgment demand. 
The joy of sunny hours spent in a hammomck with a book 
which was aimlessly read becomes a memory so vague 
that there is a doubt in the mind of the college girl as to 
whether she had ever had time to read without a purpose. 
Yet in spite of the fact that college gives an aim and pur- 
pose to our days, there is much of vacation living which 
we could well include in the busy winter of work. The 
greatest thing, perhaps, is the keen enjoyment of what 
we do. The second is the taking of the out-of-doors into 
our scheme of work. 

While for many years the Student Y. W. has sent repre- 
sentatives to the summer conference of the central field at 
Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, this is the first time our delegation 

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has been large enough to have a tent to itself. This is the 
first year also that one of the faculty members could be with 
us at the lake. A splendid time we had. Miss Johnston and 
the six girls: Abbie Peavoy, Ruth Want, Esther Fowler, 
Helena Munscon, Lois Coultas and Letta Irwin. For ten 
glorious days we camped on the hillside near the lake, listen- 
ing to lectures from such men as Rev. White of Bloomington, 
Ind., and Dr. Roll of the Iliff School of Theology at Denver, 
gaining help for the coming year from the cabinet and other 
special councils, and rowing over the beautiful lake or resting 
on its shores. From the mad dashing to reserve tables in the 
dining room to the presentation of our stunt, "The Mechani- 
cal Dolls," on College Day, we had fun mingled with our 
serious work. There is nothing that can take the place of 
the inspiration and spirit of Geneva. Sometime soon we 
shall have a Geneca meeting and tell you all about it. In 
the meantime it isn't too early to begin thinking now 
whether you would be a good delegate for next year. 

^? 

When the college doors swing open to receive us into her 
busy arms, it is necessary for us to leave behind many of our 
vacation ways and manners. No longer is the easy languor of 
a pleasant vacation day in harmony with the busy first days 
of college. The laziness of a summer afternoon has no place 
in the hustle of college life. The care-freeness of irresponsi- 
bility must take its flight when duties are placed upon us. 
The do-as-you-please days give way to the days of do-as-time 
and judgment demand. The joy of sunny hours spent in a 
hammock with a book which was aimlessly read, become a 
memory, so vague, that there is a doubt in the mind of the 
college girl as to whether she had ever had time to read 
without a purpose. Yet, in spite of the fact that college gives 
an aim and purpose to our days, there is much of vacation 
living which we could well include in the busy winter of 
work. The greatest thing, perhaps, is the keen enjoyment 
of what we do; the second is the taking of the out-of-doors 
into our scheme of work. 

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OPENING CHAPEL 

To the old students it was a glad reunion and to the 
new a happy, early assembling — our first chapel service. From 
the opening tones of the organ to the closing prayer, the ex- 
ercises were very impressive. Dr. Harker spoke briefly of 
the three main objects before every student: health, gained 
by proper exercise; rest, and food; scholarship, through hon- 
est, steady work; and faith, which is the greatest and endur- 
eth forever. Then in all we must get the idea of service as 
is suggested in our college motto: "Knowledge, Faith, 
Service." Miss Beebe sang a beautiful arrangement of the 
story of the Prodigal Son. Our new Dean, Miss Mothershead, 
was greeted with applause when presented by the President. 
It was a pleasure to have with us Dr. and Mrs. Pitner, Mrs. 
Lambert, and Mrs. Brown, and Mrs. Grates, as representatives 
of the board of trustees and former presidents, and Rev. 
White and Eev. McCarty from the Methodist churches of the 
city. 

PICNICKING 

Spring, Summer and Autumn have cases on Miss Picnic. 
That young lady sometimes even manages to beguile winter 
into giving her strangely favorable weather. When the green 
things return from their vacations, comes Maid Picnic skip- 
ping along with her basket of sandwiches in one hand, a bot- 
tle of pickles in the other and a great band of devotees saunt- 
ering lazily after. Gradually that frolicking lady shows more 
favor toward summer, so her subjects perforce overcome their 
spring disease and religiously enjoy the sandwiches and 
pickles of their leader. No wading of three-foot dust can call 
a halt, no scorching sun or kind, rain-promising cloud can 
frighten out of the procession any of the marchers. No per- 
sistent attentions from bugs and snakes can keep them from 
the gushing praise of their sovereign. Ten thousand mosqui- 
toes may make a meal of one arm, but the poor victim will 
only saj, 'Why, no, there are scarcely any insects in this lo- 

P»ge Fir* 




CI)e CoUese ^vettitiQH 




cnlity." Someone's teeth may open np the secret abiding 
place of a cute little worm and that somebody thinks nothing 
of it, unless only half of the worm is left after the bite is 
taken. So Miss Picnic goes merrily on. As Fall contrives 
to get the place of honor alongside of her, new supplies have 
to be laid in. No more baskets of sandwiches and bottle of 
pickles can any longer s'^tisfy those in her train. A huge 
wagon-load of goodies is none too much for the ravenous peo- 
ple. Suddenly comes a surprise. The trousseau is made by 
Fall and Miss Picnic becomes Mrs. Go-Nu.tting. 

FAIRY STAR 

Elizabeth smiled as she rolled out of bed and began 
dressing. She smiled throughout breakfast. Her only answer 
to the remarks of the family concerning her evident happi- 
ness was another smile. Breakfast over, she put on her red 
jacket, kissed her mother, and slipped through the side door. 
Once on the walk she began singing softly to herself, but be- 
fore she turned the corner of the house she suddenly stopped 
and her eyes opened wider. 

"What if it shouldn't be true?" whispered Elizabeth to 
herself. "But no," she went on, "the fairy can't h^ve made 
a mistake, and I know the little white gate will be there." 
Her heart pounded, however, as she turned the corner, then 
stood still for a moment, for there concealed almost entirely 
by the vines was the shining white gate that the fairy had 
told her about in her sleep the night before. Elizabeth's 
thin little legs could not carry her fast enough as she ran 
down the path, but when she opened the gate and passed 
into the Enchanted Wood, she had to stand still for pure 
delight and joy. Yesterday, on the other side of the fence 
there had been a meadow, but that had vanished over night, 
and in its stead was the wood that even in Elizabeth's dreams 
she had only known about, but had never been able to see. 

Suddenly she laughed aloud. Wasn't that a really truly 
grapevine swing just a few rods in front of her, and hadn't 
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she wanted to swing in one, ever since her father had told 
lier of the fun he used to have in them. Here at last, was 
hef chance. With trembling hands and knees, she took her 
seat. The vine held fast. Higher and higher she went. Her 
feet, now, could touch the leaves of one of the branches of 
the tree. Finally with a happy sign she said, "Now, I'll let 
the old cat die,'' and as the swing came gradually to rest, she 
looked around. She could hear a little brook singing away, 
just around that bend on the left, and she thought of the 
fun it would be to take off her shoes and stockings and wade 
in the brook that ran through the Enchanted Wood. Far 
away on the right she could see gleams of gold and silver 
among the trees and she wondered if it could be the gleams 
from the palace of the Fairy Star. 

Fairy Star! ^Yhy what had made her think of Fairy 
Star? She considered this seriously for awhile as the swing 
went backwards and forwards and more slowly. Never before 
fhad she heard of such a name. Then she laughed and said 
crossly to herself, "Oh, you big silly! It was Fairy Star that 
told you about the white gate and it is Fairy Star that made 
you think of her name, and oh, why, of course, she'll be some- 
where around here, and if I hunt, maybe I can find her. 

No sooner said than she had jumped from the swing and 
started toward the gleaming gold and silver. It took longer 
than she had expected, though, to come to the trees. On her 
way, a humming bird flew up to her, and fluttered about her 
head, touched her lips once with his bill as if to give her a 
kiss, and then flew off. Big white butterflies, whose wings 
were covered with green and silver hovered over her as she 
passed under the stately trees. She walked past fountains 
where flashing water rose and fell while the sun touched the 
spray until it seemed as if an ever changing mass of diamonds 
and rubis was held suspended in the air. There were ponds 
filled with gold fish, that darted and swam through their 
depths, until to Elizabeth's eyes there were only lines and 
flashes of swirling flame in the water. She came also to 
gardens where bloomed flowers that she had never sen. 

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One kind of these strange new flowers was so beautiful 
that Elizabeth could not leave it. She stood and looked at 
it as the wind moved its long green leaves and while the yel- 
low petals seemed to grow now larger, now smaller. Surely, 
sometime, somewhere before had she seen it. She leaned 
forward looking at it more closely. The flower seemd to be 
breathing. Suddenly, with a flout of short of white skirts, 
the Fairy Star appeared before Elizabeth's eyes. Her yellow 
hair hung to the bottom of her skirt, and the blue of her 
eyes and the pink of her cheeks made Elizabeth catch her 
breath to think how beautiful the fairy was. The dream had 
not made her so beautiful. The fairy smiled and lifted her 
wand and touched Elizabeth's little gold locket. Instantly 
in the very center appeared a ruby so clear and perfect that 
Elizabeth knew none in the world could be found to match 
this jewel given her in Fairyland. 

"This," said the fairy, "is your talisman. When you 
go back home, and it is almost time now, no one will be able 
to see it save you yourself. The little gate will be gone and 
when you look over the fence there will be only the meadow 
but if you kiss the ruby, the little gate will appear and you 
can pass through, back to our Enchanted Wood." 

A little breeze sprang up, and the fairy swayed to and 
fro with it, gazing all the while into Elizabeth's eyes and 
smiling. "When they tell you there is no Fairyland and no 
Enchanted Wood, and no Fairy Star, who is queen over all, 
touch your talisman and you will know, little child of day 
dreams, that all these things are true." 

As she spoke these last words the wind, which played 
melodies continually through the trees, lifted her gently 
from her feet and Elizabeth was left, gazing deep into the 
heart of the yellow flower. Slowly she retraced her steps, 
past the ponds and the fountains, past the grape vine swing, 
down to the gate that had opened in the morning to let her 
into the Wood Enchanted. 

The next morning came but Elizabeth did not get up 
with another happy smile on her face. Instead she lay in 

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bed and felt very tired and when she did not come down to 
breakfast her mother sent for the doctor. Elizabeth's good 
did doctor — Jarvis. And Dr. Jarvis looked at Elizabeth quite 
crossly but with a sly twinkle in his eyes and said, "H-m, 
young lady, played out in the woods all day yesterday, didn't 
you, and talked with the fairies?" Elizabeth smiled then for 
the doctor always understood, even when no one else did, and 
nodded a happy yes, in reply. 

"Well, now," went on the doctor, "supposing you just 
tell me about it, while Mrs. John gets us some breakfast." 
And Elizabeth told Dr. Jarvis all about it, while her mother 
fixed the breakfast and she even showed him the rubv. and 
he could see it too; oh, very plainly! Then came the break- 
fast, and after that Elizabeth decided to get up and walk 
around the house for a little time. But Dr. Jarvis said to 
Elizabeth's mother when he went down the staihcase and 
stopped in the hall for a minute: "Too much cerebral excite- 
ment. Madam; entirely too much. Her body can't stand for 
it. You've got to get her away from this atmosphere. Every 
old gossip in this neighborhood has a lot of folk tales and 
fancy stories stored up in her mind, and that child upstairs 
can't think or see or dream anything else. Take her away for 
five or six months." 

Early the first morning after her return, just as on that 
day six months before, Elizabeth slipped once more around 
the corner of the house. 

"It might have been true," she said seriously, "but 
'somehow it seems so far away, and I can't even find the 
ruby, now." Quickly she looked down the path. Would it 
be the Enchanted Wood or the meadow? With a long drawn 
sigh, the doubtful expression vanished. The little white 
gate, too, was gone. 

Lois Coultas '13 



P»ge Nin« 




^tie College (§reettng£! 



ON OPENING A TRUNK 

Flutter, flutter miller-moth 
From out the folds of my best cloth 
I'd thought to use to make a gown. 
But there you've left holes up and down. 
In every foTH the dot of blue 
Is eaten wholly out by you. 
I ruefully watch you hover about, 
Then, angry, think I'll fix you right. 
And clap you between my hands quite tight, 
But I miss; you've managed to fly without, 
This time to find my muff, no doubt. 



TO A CATERPILLAR 

You're funny and woolly and long and thin, 

And you crawl with a hump, I see; 
I like to watch you, I wish you'd go faster. 

But, oh, don't come nearer me. 

You're yellow there between your rings; 

Is that black spot your nose? 
If Willie were here, he'd let you crawl 

Eight up and over his toes. 

Oh, here, let me balance you on this stick, 

You fell; did it hurt; that's no fair. 
You're all curled up in a little circle 

And upside down; I declare. 

Were Willie here, he'd set you to rights. 

He says that girls are silly. 
He chased me once; it wasn't fun. 

But goodbye quick — there's Willie. 

— Anns Marshali, '13 
Page Ten 



ii^'i^a^mssm 



^fje Cottege (Greetings! 




THE SUNBEAM 

A beam shown down in a green, green glade; 

From far in the sky to the grass it came, 
Through leaves that danced and shadows made 

No two at once or ever the same. 
He shone; he twinkled; he waltzed in shade, 

With flowers for partners, this gay young beam; 
He kissed each one in the part he played. 
Each blossom he'd touched would drop her head 
When she saw her neighbor as rival led; 
Then as all were tasted, he took his flight; 
The flowers crept under quite out of sight. 

THE TWENTY-FIFTH LINK 

There are some rare families to whom anniversaries are 
days of sacrament when the best one has is offered in love 
at the shrine of comradeship. So it was with the Ditson fam- 
ily. Perhaps it was that very fact that had kept the romance 
in their home through the twenty-five years since Tom and 
Lucy Ditson had started it. Anniversaries had seen to their 
opportunities to express visible appreciation of the love and 
companionship that they had found. Their wedding day had 
always been the one great anniversary- — the day of all days 
that they devoted to each other — and for the first time on her 
silver wedding day, Mrs. Ditson was alone. This morning 
she had finished the few breakfast dishes and had done the 
straightening swiftly that she might the better watch for the 
mail man. Eagerly she strained to catch the first glimpse of 
him as he turned the corner two blocks below. She knew 
there would be a letter for her — confidence born of remem- 
bered anniversaries assured her of that. She almost knew 
what it would contain and she colored as a girl waiting for 
her lover's message. She knew, too, that Tom would have 
little to say of what was really most important, fearing to 
spoil what little pleasure she might find in a day apart from 
him by bad news of the forest. Yesterday had come only a 

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hasty note from the fire line, telling her that the situation 
was far more serious in the timber lands than even Tom had 
dared think when word came to the lumber firm that fire 
was raging in the forest tract. How worn and haggard Tom 
had looked when he left, for the year had been a bad one in 
business and now fire threatened the new sawmill that had 
eaten the profits of the last few years in its construction. But 
even as they had hurriedly packed the traveling bag, while 
Lucy was putting studs in extra shirts Tom had found time 
to put his arm around her and whisper that he didn't believe 
he could get back for the eighteenth and to tell her then 
some of the tender anniversary messages. She had been 
brave at the time; she had told him not to worry about her, 
that s:he would be thinking only of him and wishing for good 
news, but she had watched him off with a lonesome ache 
that grew bigger as the days went by until it was almost more 
than she could master this morning. 

There on top of the letter pile lay the one from Cedar- 
ville that she had been watching for, and under it one from 
Helen. Helen's, she knew, would be full of breezy college 
news, of the latest stunt, a coming party, and somewhere 
in its scribbled pages would be "best anniversary wishes for 
Mmnsie and Dad," and perhaps half a page about how much 
it meant to her that there ever had been occasion for thi» 
particular anniversary. But Helen's letter could wait — Mrs, 
Ditson put it aside as she settled down to read her husband's. 
It was a tender letter, mostly reminiscent, for as she had ex- 
pected, there was little of the ravages of the fire except the 
one line, "The fire is still gaining headway. I am afraid, 
little wife, our silver collection wont grow much this year." 
She had told Tom especially not to pay any attention to an 
anniversary present. She was happy that he had known that 
she didn't need presents to realize his devotion. And yet it 
was hard to have their silver chain broken. "The silver 
chain" they had called it even since that first eighteenth of 
October when Tom had fastened the little silver chain around 
her neck. Each anniversary had added a link in the silver 
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chain of years, for each year Tom had brought her some bit 
of silver. It was a sacred anniversary rite of Lucy's to bring 
all her silver gifts and to polish them tenderly and resplend- 
ently. This morning she had collected them all, from the 
first little chain to the oyster fork of last year. By the worth 
of the gifts she could trace the ups and downs of the years, 
from the single odd pickle fork or bon-bon spoon to the most 
elegant coffee service that had celebrated Tom's election into 
the lumber firm. Each gift had its associations, its memories 
of a gay holiday, or half holiday, according as Tom was clerk 
or junior partner and could command or ask for time. But 
each gift, whether great or small, had its share of love and 
that it was that had brought the happy flush to Mrs. Ditson's 
cheek. 

Theodore Ditson, lately graduated from Teddy days by 
his position of clerk in his father's firm, had found his mother 
still polishing when he rushed in at noon to give her a very 
full-sized and energetic hug, and bring "white, roses for the 
bride, Mumsie dear, and I'm to play bride-groom this after- 
noon, for I'm off a whole hour early and we'll go jaunting 
together." 

"Teddy, dear, you shouldn't have " Mrs. Ditson be- 
gan from the roses. 

"Mumsie Ditson, are you crying? Shame on you! Try 
and see if I won't make as good a beau as Dad. Why, Mum- 
sie, I don't believe you've even started lunch and I'm almost 
starved," Teddy called from the kitchen. 

"0, Teddy, I didn't realize it was so late. But you run 
out of here and I'll have luncheon ready in a jiffy." 

"Surely I can set the table with all the silver array ready, 
only please don't ask me to eat with oyster forks, just because 
that would be the sentimental thing to do." 

Teddy, steering clear of the lumber topic," for news from 
his father that morning had been most discouraging and this 
was the one day when troubles weren't brought to mother, 
made luncheon as hilarious as he could, smiling devoted at- 

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tention across the table to his mother, enthroned behind her 
bride's roses and shining coffee service. 

"Bravo for little mother/' Teddy thought to himself as 
he left the house after luncheon, never realizing that his 
mother's gaiety was as forced as his own. 

The afternoon proved harder than the morning for Mrs. 
Ditson, for there was still time after all the silver gifts were 
put away before four o'ciock when Teddy was due. She was 
all dressed, even to the laying out of the little chain of her 
first anniversary long before then. She held the necklace 
in her hands; its links were perfect, and it was hard to think 
that one link would be missing from her silver chain of years. 
What an odd chain it was with tiny and big links — a silver 
filigree pin link next to a silver tray link. She had told Tom 
not to get anything — of course that was right — and it meant 
more that he knew that she understood than any priceless 
gift could have meant without that understanding. But a 
broken chain must ever be a broken chain, or a soldered one 
and even love could not solder over a missing link. 

She clasped the perfect chain to hurry down for the 
afternoon mail, and the banging screen door announced its 
arrival. Sunday there wouldn't be another letter from Tom; 
no, there weren't any letters; only a tiny box that she opened 
eagerly. Within, enthroned on its bed of cotton, lay a brand 
new silver dime. 

Louise Gatks. 



"'TWAS BRILLIG" 

"'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves — 



With the re-reading of the old words the girl down on 
the floor Tbefore the bookcase forgot that she was no longer 
a little girl, forgot that she was supposed to be grown up now, 
that her skirts were quite long, and that she had put away 
childish things; forgot that she was no longer the playmate 
of the child Alice. The "Jabberwock" and the "mimsy 

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brogoves"' called to her till this afternoon >hie wondered if 
after all she wasn't still ready to go with Alice anywhere. 

Once again she was back in that little girl's land of 
"Let's Pretend." What a land it had been too. Almost 
breathlessly she had read with Alice of all those mystic crea- 
tures and as Alice had said, "It seems very pretty. Some- 
how it seems to fill my head with ideas." So her own head 
had been filled with ideas. What mattered it if the dic- 
tionary failed to make more clear those curious words. In 
this land of hers she could herself find meanings. " 'Twas 
brillig" meant quite plainly that it was four o'clock, and the 
possibility of anyone's disagreeing had never entered her head. 
The "slithy toves" w^ere very realistic in their writhings and 
the "Jabberwock" himself was dreadful beyond all words. 
How cruel it had been to be called back to the real world 
for prosaic meals. More than once the despicable soup had 
been swallowed just for the pure joy of saying, 
"Beautiful soup, so rich and green, 
Waiting in a hot tureen * * * 
Soup of the evening — ^beautiful soup." 

And once on a very memorable occasion a broken mirror 
testified of an attempt to enter into that wonderful land of 
looking-glass flowers and beasts. 

Xow as the grown-up girl sat before the bookcase she 
wondered somewhat, why instinctively she had sought Alice 
again this afternoon. To be sure, it was a child's story, but 
her love for it had grown as she had grown. As a child she 
had loved it for its very impossibility and for its fascination, 
because it was a fairy tale. 

Now she loved it because she was beginning to under- 
stand it. She thought of the genius that could tell such a 
story, for it must needs take genius to imagine a tale so fas- 
cinating that children loved it, and grownups kept it among 
their classics. Once she had never thought of the mastery 
of words, the skill and artistic touches in their combination. 
True, she still felt that her present love for the story would 
amount to little, were it not based on her childish love; but 

Page Fifteen 



on the other hand she knew that her little girl's conception 
would only be a pleasant memory, had not study and knowl- 
edge given her a cleared understanding. She didn't care now 
who knew she still loved Alice; now she was no longer 
ashamed to confess that night after night she had put her- 
self to sleep drowsily murmuring, " 'Twas brillig." 

SWIMMING 

"You want to know how I learned to swim. Oh! That 
was easy enough." 

"Why, of course I wasn't afraid of getting my new bath- 
ing suit wet, but I couldn't help the water being cold at first. 
Then I dived right in — no, I didn't mean sure enough div- 
ing — I meant I waded out and ducked under. Does that suit 
you better?" 

"Well, I don't care if you don't call that swimming; it's 
the only way to learn. Then I lifted both feet up at once and 
began to churn the water in all directions, and about that 
time I went under. 

"Did I swallow any water? Well I should say! Why 
the lake lowered several inches (before I could cough up the 
water I had swallowed). Before long that got monotonous 
and I decided to try floating for awhile, but don't you know, 
every time I tried to float on my back, my head would hit the 
bottom with a thud. 

"Well, yes, I did go back to swimming and tried every 
way that had ever been invented until 

"Oh, you are wrong there! I did learn. One day they 
said I couldn't learn and it made me so angry I swam just 
to prove I could. 

"Just like a woman, you say? Yes, it is like a woman 
to do what she tries, isn't it?" 

Y. W. C. A. NOTES 

Y. W. C. A. — "a very present help in time of need," has 

already lived up to its name in this, the first week of school. 

Early Monday morning the Y. W. girls began meeting 

Page Sixteen 



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Wi^t College Greetings! 




trains and welcoming the new girls to I. W. C, nor was this 
work discontinued until late Wednesday night. 

In the hall near the main entrance was an Information 
Bureau, managed entirely by the Y. W. C. A. From there 
the girls were shown to their rooms, taken to the different 
departments to register, and their numerous and varied ques- 
tions answered. 

On the following Saturday night the Y. W. C. A. enter- 
tained all the new girls and iiiiif;e living out in town at its 
annual party. Each old givl invited and brought a guest, 
making some two hundred and fifty present. The ca'binet 
stood in the receiving line and welcomed them. Every girl 
wore her name pinned upon her, and the purpose of the fea- 
tures that followed was to make everyone acquainted with 
everyone else. 

Eefreshments of mint frappe and wafers were served in 
a roof garden, which was so decorated with branches, vines 
and other foliage that it made a perfect little arbor in the 
air. Its seclusion was furthered by its being lighter! entirely 
l-y Japanese lanterns, that were strung among the branche-. 
A i:)antomime, repre;?enting Pilgrim's Progress, applied to Y. 
\X. C. A. progress, but in the olden style and dress, and given 
in a continuous tableau, closed the altogether successful 
evening. 

SOME 1913 Y. W. C. A. 

Helen Moore is teaching English and Expression in 
the Synodical College in Taladega, Ala. 

Elizabeth Tendick has charge of English in the High 
School in Hume, 111., and Golden Berryman has the same de- 
partment in Batavia. Lois Coultas is doing graduate work 
in the University of Illinois where she won a fellowship for 
her high scholarship. Josephine Eoss remains in I. W. C. 
halls, continuing her course for her degree. 

The graduates in the Home Economics course who were 
wishing to teach have secured positions as follows: Agnes 

Page Seventeen 




^tje College ^xtetinzsi 



Kogerson is assistant teacher in the Jacksonville High School; 
Mary Louise Dickie is in the Agricultural College in Ever- 
green, Ala., and will next year return to College to pursue 
the course for her degree. xVnna Heist is in Murphy College, 
Levierville, Tenn.; Helen Ingalls in the High School in 
White Hall; Euth liie in the Granite Falls, Minn., High 
School; Goldie McLaird in West Concord, Minn.; Jessie 
Campbell in Lawrence^dlle, 111., High School, and Frances 
Freeman in Marion, 111. These enthusiastic well-trained 
girls are sure to reflect credit upon the I. W. C. Home 
Economics School. 

Elizabeth Dunbar follows her preferred line of study in 
teaching High School English in Raymond, 111. The re- 
maining names in the list must be left until the next issue 
oi the Greetings. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

We are looking forward to a great year for the Athletic 
Association. During the summer the tennis courts have been 
leveled and j esown, so that they arc in fine condition for the 
fall tennis. Everyone should remember that spring will bring 
another and better tournament even than we had last spring. 
Already the long bow h;is been seen on the back campus and 
the archers are trying to become expert enough to shoot 
rampaging goats and such on Hike Club expeditions or 
Science trips. 

ALUMNAE NOTES 

Vacation days with the freedom of out-of-door life, long 
twilights and glorious harvest moons are days of romance. 
Always the announcements of engagements and the sending 
out of wedding cards seem to follow the summer time. 

On August 1st at Ashland, 111., announcement was made 
of the engagement of Miss Annette Eearick, '13, to Mr. Harry 
J. Lohman. Miss Eearick was prominent in College activi- 
Page Eighteen 



tIDfjc CoUege <ilreetmsss 




tic^ during her four years here, holding Senior Chiss, Y. W. 

C. A. and Phi Nu presidencies. Mr. Lehman is in the groc- 
ery business in Ashhmd. The date of the wedding has not 
yet been set. 

Last June brought record of two I. W. C. brides. Miss 
FJ oisc Smith was married the middle of the month to Mr. 
Ewen Whitlock. They are living in Jacksonville. On June 
2-5th Miss Helen Lewis, ^10, of Quincy, and Mr. Alvin Keys 
of S]n'ingfield, were married at the bride's home. They are 
v.t home in Springfield, 1309 South Seventh street. 

]\Iiss Gertrude ISTewman of the class of 1914 was married 
to Mr. Obermeyer. Her college friends and classmates join 
in wishing her a happy life. 

Among the September brides in Jacksonville are several 
L W. C. daughters. On the third, Catherine Eogerson and 
Dr. Henry C. Woltman were married at the home of the 
bride. The service was read by Dr. Davis, out on the beau- 
tiful lawn, where the bridal party met him at an improvised 
altar beneath the fine old oak trees which no doubt had been 
a favorite trysting place. Dr. and Mrs. Woltman Mall con- 
tinue to reside in Jacksonville. 

On September 13th Mr. and Mrs. Ezra C. Scott gave 
their duTghter Emma in marriage to Mr. Robert Raper Jen- 
nings. President Harker,who had just arrived at homo from 
his summer abroad, read the service with impressive feeling 
for this former pupil. Mr. and Mrs. Jennings will engage in 
Christian Association work in Jenkins, Ky. 

In Danville at Kimber Church, on September 7tb, Edna 

D. Starkey, class of 1905, was married to Dr. Otto H. Crist, 
and the home of these young people will continue to be in 
that city. 

The culmination of a pretty romance which began on 
n trans- Atlantic liner when Anne Wliite was returning from 
n vear's study in Oxford, England, occurred on Jnly 5th 
Avhon this favorite alumna of the class of 1905 became the 

Page Nineteen 



SM'tmM IMUmHaWMW tMWWWBM 

tEf)t College (JlreetingS 



^^ 



!)ritlc of r:of. A. B. Me^ervcy of Dartmouth College. The 
happ_y journey across tlie Atlantic proved ample time for 
these enthusiastic students to discover their congenial tastes 
and aspirations and the longer voyage of life promises every 
hapjnness as they enter upon it in the interesting old college 
town of Hanover, New Hampshire. 

Another wedding which interests alumnae of recent 
years is that of the son of President and ]\Irs. Harker — Mr. 
Ealph W. Harker — wlio on September 7th was united in 
marriage with Miss Bertha Gray of Portland, Oregon. The 
bonds bringing these .young people together were woven dur- 
ing their student days in Northwestern University, four 
years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Harker will make their home in 
San Francisco, where Mr. Harker holds a responsible posi- 
tion as manager of the San Francisco office of the Dake Ad- 
vertising Agency. 

Eecent Chicago papers have given full mention of the 
meeting of the National Council of Women \'oters which was 
held in Wcishington City. Mrs. Clyde W. Stone, an alumna 
of I. W. C. in the class of 189-i, acted on the Congressional 
Committee. 

The annual convention of the "Woman's Home Mission- 
ary Society will be held in Washington in October. A large 
number of I. W. C. daughters will be in attendance; among 
the number from the class of '74 is Mrs. Emma Graves Per- 
kins of San Francisco, who is chairman of the bureau for 
the work among the Japanese, Korean, Hawaiian and Orien- 
tal women on the Pacific coast. Mrs. J. R. Woodcock, of 
the Centennial Class, is general secretary of Guards and 
Jewels and is planning for an exhibit that will represent the 
work of the important department. Miss Olivia Dunlap, Na- 
tional Organizer, is a graduate of I. W. C. in the class of '88. 

Mrs. Bertha Reeed Coffman and her hus- 
'band. Dr. George R. Coffman, have spent the last two years 
in Chicago, doing graduate work in the University. Mrs. 

Page Twenty 



^f)t College (jlreetingji I yj 



Coffman lias for 3'ears been an enthusiastic student of Ger- 
man, and received her Ph. D. in that work at the summer 
convocation. Dr. Coffman has accepted the position as pro- 
fessor of English in the [Tniversity of Montana, located at 
Missoula, which will he their future home. 



COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

The enrollment of the College of Music is far superior 
to that of last year. 

The class in public school music started in with a good 
enrollment under the direction of Miss Ailsie Goodrick. Miss 
Goodrick has had a long experience in this work, having 
taught in many public schools, including the Jacksonville 
schools, where she is now employed. 

While Director and Professor Swarthout had private 
classes during the summer, they were able to find time to 
make an automobile tour to Lake Shawano, Wisconsin. 

Miss Louise Miller, a former student and faculty mem- 
ber of the college, has accepted the position of secretary and 
accompanist for Frederick W. Eoot of Chicago. 

Miss Beebe coached with Karleton Hackett of Chicago, 
during her vacation months, and her recital program will be 
selections, entirely from American composers. 

Miss Nicholson spent three very pleasant weeks of her 
vacation in the Adirondacks. 

Mrs. Colean visited in Petoskey, Michigan. 

Miss Hay was cashier and bookkeeper for "The Bayview 
Summer Home Association." 

Mrs. Hartman spent the vacation at her home in Fond 
du Lac, Wisconsin. 

Mrs. Kolp had a class in Jacksonville this summer. 

Page Twenty-one 



tlTfje College (Greetings! 



THE ARTISTS' COURSE 

Xov. 3 — Van Vliet, cello; M. Edwards, piano, 

Nov. 17 — Mrs. Grace W. Jess, voice. Miss Robinson. 

Dec. 7 — J. A. Eiis, lecture. 

Jan. 12 — ^Clarence Eddy, organ. 

Jan. 31— M. Flowers, reader. 

Feb. 9 — E. Howard Griggs, lecture. 

March 2 — Christine Miller, voice. 

March 27 — Kneisel Quartette. 

One other lecture on art will be announced later, 

THE COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Sept. 15 — First Eegistration Day. The early comers 
register. 

Sept. 16 — Second Eegistration Day. A busy one for 
the faculty and Y. W. C. A. 

Sept. 17 — Opening chapel. 

Sept. 18 — Classes reported for recitations, 

Sept. 19 — Miss Johnston and Miss Anderson entertained 
the Seniors and Juniors at a delightful tea on the campus 
in honor of Miss Mothershead. 

Sept, 20 — The Y. W, party for the new girls. 

Sept. 21— First meeting of the Y. W. C. A.. Subject: 
"The Meaning of Y. W." Leader, Euth Want. 

Sept. 22 — A day to finish settling of rooms. 

Sept, 23— Greeting's Day at chapel. 

Sept. 27— College Sing, 

Page Twenty-two 




tS^fit CoUege (§reetinssi 




SOCIETY NOTES 

PhiNu 

Phi Nu regrets the loss of three of her official mem'bers. 
Mary Lawson and Vera Hess will not return. Anne Ship- 
ley's health is making her an unwilling absent member. Miss 
Crum has been elected to fill the secretary's chair, and Miss 
Gumerson to act as treasurer. 

Ruth Eeavis, after an absence of two years, has returned 
to resume her work. 

Belles Lettres 

It may be of interest to those who knew our last year's 
Seniors to learn that Anna Heist is teaching Domestic 
Science in Sieversville, Tenn.; that Lois Coultas will take her 
Master's Degree at Champaign this year, and that Grolden 
Berryman has a responsible position as teacher of language 
in Batavia, 111. 

Lambda Alpha Mu 

Lambda Alpha Mu is glad to welcome back its members. 

The new society room on fourth floor, Barker Hall, pre- 
sents a dignified and yet homelike appearance in shades of 
brown and tan, and it does the hearts of the girls good to 
sing to the strains of their own piano. 

At a called meeting of the society, the following officers 
were elected to fill the places of those who did not return 
this year: Secretary, Miss Florence Haller; corresponding sec- 
retary. Miss Hazel Kinnear; pianist. Miss Edith Colton; 
ushers. Miss Hazel Kiblinger and Miss Lucille Eheinbach. 

Theta Sigma 

Theta Sigma starts out twenty-one strong this year. Al- 
though we are very sorry to lose a large number of our mem- 
Page Twenty-three 



maasuKXBrmxtm'-A 




W^t CoUege ^xttiinqii 



bers, we feel fortunate in having as many left as there are. 
We especially regret the loss of several of our officers. The 
following have been elected to fill the vacancies: 

President, Helen McGhee. Treasurer, Mary Baldridge. 
Summoner, Mabel Larson. Librarian, Clara Kelly. Choris- 
ter, Louise Hughes. 

We are comfortably settled this year in a home of our 
own, in the fifth floor alcove of Barker Hall. We have fur- 
nished the room, and are glad to welcome any of the new 
comers to this new home of ours. 

FACULTY NOTES 

We are all sorry that critical illness at home has pre- 
vented Miss Jennie Anderson from returning to us. 

The faculty were entertained at a dinner on the Satur- 
day night before registration day by Mrs. Harker. 

A number of new members have taken their places on 
the faculty. Miss Helen Parsons in the French department; 
Miss Baker of the English department; Miss Florence 
Churton, director in Home Economics; Miss Leicht is her 
assistant; Miss Mothershead will have charge of the depart- 
ment of Philosophy. 



Fage Twenty-four 



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|. THE TWENTY DEPARTMENTS in our store are | 

I just like twenty little stores, every one devoted to | 

I the sale and display of articles FOR THE Modern | 

I Woman's wear. I 

£ = 

I Each Department makes a determined and successful | 

I effort to show first the attractive new styeES [ 

I OF THE SEASON. You'll find shopping- pleasant I 

i here. 1 



Kid Gloves 
Neckwear 
Fabric Gloves 
lyinen 

White Goods 
Notions 
I^aces and 



Embroideries 



Corsets 

Art Goods 

Petticoats 

Handkerchiefs 

Ribbons 

Toilet Goods 

Jewelry and 



Knit Underwear 
Hosiery 

Children's Wear 
Muslin Underwear 
and Waists 
Coats and Suits 
Dresses 



lycather 



LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINCS. 




FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

Footwear for all occasions — 
Street Shoes 

Dress Slippers 

Bed-room Slippers 

h: o IP IP E i^ s' 

We Repair Shoes 



J. A. OBBRMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

Pennants, Stationery, Tennis Goods, Drug's, School 

Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory 

Books and Photo Albums 

'•pl,b;ase;d customi^rs" — our motto 

Goods Delivered 



Phones: IlliuoiB 57a, Bell 457 



Corner South Main St. and Square 



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otto Speith 
IPboto portraiture 



Our Portraits were accepted and hung at the National Convention 
in Kansas City 1913 



I Formerly Watson Studio 



Southwest Corner Square I 



At the Registration Table 

New Student: "I want to graduate." 

Miss D.: "What in?" 

New Student: "I don't care; just so I graduate." 

Miss N.: "Did you say sign Clara up? Oh, I thought 
you said sign Geneva Upp." 

New Student: "I want to take a course in home 
economies." 



|Go to 

I MULLENIX & HAMILTON 

I For Everything Sweet 

I Hot and Cold Sodas 

£ 

I 216 Kast State Street 



Coover&Shrevel 

Have a complete line of I 

Drugs, Kodaks, Perfumes, I 
Stationery and Holiday Giftsi 

We do Developing- & Printing-I 

I 

Cast and Weat Side Square f 



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I The most dainty thing's in Rings and Jewelry. I 

I New and handsome styles of g'oods in Sterling* Silver | 

I ' Hig-hest g"rades of Cut Glass, and every | 

I description of Spectacles and Eye Glasses i 

I Fine Diamonds a Specialty | 

I ^^ i 

I RUSSEIvIv&LYON'S I 

I The Oldest Established Jewelry House in Central Illinois | 

I West Side Square | 

I Both Phones 96 i 



E 






All the Faculty, Students and Friendsl 


i 


Mathis, Kamm & Shibe 


say 


of the College should have a Checking| 
or Savings Account with | 


1 


We can furnish your 

Shoes and Party Slippers 

in the popular styles, 


F. G. FARRELL & COJ 

BANKERS 1 

= 


1 


leathers, and 




F. E. Farrell, President i 


1 


fabrics 




E. E. Crabtree, Vice-President | 
H. H. Potter, Cashier | 


1 






M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier | 

i 



A Conversation 

"Miss Mothershead said — " 

"Not Miss Mothershead; the Mothershead — it's a title, 
not her name. It's what they call her as head of the school." 



#rapf)ic 

arte 

Concern 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAIv OCCASIONS 



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For those who discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to 
please the students who come to our city. We select only the 
best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. 

Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 
Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 
College functions. 

Vickery 3c Merrigan 

227 West State Street 



IBoth Phones 309 



I SAFEST PLACE TO TRADE 

|fllLLERBY'§ 

I DRY GOODS STORE 



West Side Square 



Brady Bros. 

E^verything" in Hardware and 
Paints 



At the Information Bureau 

Girl's Father: "Please can you tell me when I can get a 
train for Carlinville?" 



I The Jacksonville National Bank 

I invites your business 



jAGKSOMVfUM, lUL* 

Established 1890 

Low Prices Square Dealing" 
Keep us busy 

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E 


Capital . . . $200,000 
Surplus . . 34.000 
Deposits . . . 1,100,000 


ju. 


S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 


5 


Julius E. Strawn, President 
Chas. B. Graff, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear 

H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

J, R. Robertson 




^iininiHiiinitiiMiriniiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiMiiimiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiHiMiiiiiiiMimiiiMiiiHiHiiiiiiiiiMiMiiMiiiiitiniirHi^ 

- H 

I Coats, Suits and Skirts tailored to your individual | 

I measure and form at | 

I POPULAR PRICES | 

I All work made in our own shop by expert workmen. We | 

I guarantee to fit you. | 

I JACKSONVILLE TAILORING COMPANY I 



233 East State Street 



Opposite Pacific Hotel 



New Girl: "Sa}^ do you suppose that there is any way 1 
can get a front room with two south windows?'' 

"Please can you tell me if the circus parade goes 'by 
here ?'' 



IHARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL CO, 

I Designs, Cut Flowers, 

I Plants 

I Southwest Corner Square 

I Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

I Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

I Greenhouses, Bell 775 



McGINNIS' I 

The Young Ladies' Shoe Store | 

See the "BABY DOLL SHOE.'I 
It's the Latest. I 

We carry a full line of Bveuing Slippers! 
in all colors. | 

If it's new, we have it | 

JAS. McGINNIS & 0O.| 

East Side Square | 



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Andre & Andre | 

E)verything in | 

High Grade House Furnishingl 

for E^verybody, Eiverywhere I 

46-50 North Side Square | 



CAFE BATZ 

And Annex for Ladies 

221-223 E^ast State Street 

Illinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 



e:. a. schoedsack 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111. 
Illinois Phone 388 



E. F., introducing a new girl: "Miss Bigger — " 
New Girl: "Did you say Bigger?" 

E. F., dippily: "Well, I don't know if she's bigger or 
not, but that's her name.'" 



Florence Kirk King 
Hair Dresser 

special Service in Shampooing 
Scalp Treatment, Manufacturing 
Hair into Latest Styles 

Work done by appointment 
111. Puone 837 503 W. College St. 



s 

Cherry's Livery | 

Finest Light and Heavyl 
Livery | 

X 

Lowest Rates | 

I 
I 

35-237, 302-304-306 North Main Stiee^ 



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PHOTOGRAPHER 



i Successor to McCullousfh Bros. 



East Side Square | 



I Cameras, Films, Papers, 

I Photo Supplies for Kodakers 
IDcYcIopingf, Printing and Mounting 
I at reasonable prices 

I Armstrongs Drug Store 

I South West Corner Square 



S. S. Kresge Co.) 

5c & IOC Store | 



New and Up-to-Date 



"Can ^aui tell me where the College Home is? I have 
been here three days, and I haven't seen a thing of it unless 
it is that large house at the lower end of the campus." 



Ask your g^rocer for 

HOLSUM 

bre:ad 

Made Clean. Delivered clean 
in waxed paper wrappers 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Art Needle Work 
and Millinery 

211 West state Street 



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j IISIXEC3RIXY 

|We have bailt up our GROCERY and DRUG Departments on a $oli< 
ffoundation of INTEGRITY. In our GROCERY and DRUGS WI 
jSAY WHAT WE BELIEVE, and our customers BELIEVE WHAl 
|WE SAY. Every item in our store is an example of PURE FOOD 
ICLEAN FOOD, GOOD FOOD and BEST DRUGS* 
|OURS is a GROCERY AND DRUG STORE with a CONSCIENCI 

K/OBIBI^TS BIE^OS. Phon.. soo 

Grocery —Pharmacy 

29 South Side Sq. 



i Phones 800 



Pictorial Review Patterns 

For Sale at 


Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 

A. L. Bromley 

Ladies' Tailor 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and 
Repairing. Ladies' Man Tail- 
ored Suits to order. Remodeling 


^■a^DK*(iD0m;STORF ^^^ 


of all kinds. Special rates to 


. ^1^ » — 


I. W. C. students. All work 
called for and delivered promptly 



Serapnina Enters College 

Seraphina, at the train to the Y. W. girl who met her: 
"Please direct me to the college. No, just show me the way 
and I'll find my way. I don't care to go with the other girls." 

Seraphina, at the Information Bureau: "Will a red crepe 
kimona do to wear in my room? I want to save my silk one 
to wear when the faculty give spreads." 



1 


111. Phone 57 Bell Phone 92 




1 


Fresh Drugs, 
Fancy Goods 
Stationery 

THE 

Badger DruQ Siore 


Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 


1 


2 doors West of Postoffice 




1 235 R. State Street 

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It will pay you to visit | 

SCHRAM'S I 

Jewelry Store | 

COLLEGE PINS, RINGS, vSPOONS, ETC. | 



Len G. Magill 
Printer 

East State Street 111. Phone 418 



y AYLOR'S l 

Grocery 

A g-ood place to trade j 
221 West State Street | 



Seraphina at the registration table: Miss C: "What Ger- 
man have you read?"' 

Seraphina: "Gluck x\uf, Immeusee, and Heath's Die 
tionary." 

Shouldn't Seraphina have extra credit? 



Montgomery & Deppe 

IN THEIR NEW PLACE ON THE WEST SIDE OF 

THE SQUARE ARE SHOWING 

EVERYTHING IN 

Dry Goods and Ready-to-Wear Garments 

Telephone for the Fall Catalogue 



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College Jewelrv 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 

Chaflng Dishes, Copper and Brass Goods 

Special Die Stationer/ 

21 South Side Square 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 



HERE TO PLEASE 



I Candies 

I Cookies 

I Sandwiches 

I Groceries 



Cakes 

Pie* 

Pop on Ice 

California Fruits 



School Supplies 



Jacksonville's foremost Men's Store 

Mackinaw and Sweater Coats 

Mannish Cut and Form Fitting ■ 

Hand Bags, Suit Cases and 
Trunks 

I. W. C. Banners and Pillows 

SPECIAL DESIGNS ON REQUEST 



Seraphina fixing her room; to her room-mate who is la- 
menting a soiled curtaiil: "Well let's just wash it and hang 
it up and let it dry wet; then we'll not have to iron it." 

Seraphina, sending for a light, when asked what size 
says: "I don't know exactly, but a fifty horse-power will be 
all right." 



[Ladies' Late Style Sweater 
! Coats 



Are Sold by 



Frank Byrns ^,, 



C.S.MARTIN 

Wall Paper, Painting 
and Interior Decorating- 
Pictures and Frames 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 
Jacksonville, 111. 

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Cafe 



Confectionary 



Ipeacock Inn 



Catering- 



Soda 



Candies 



SKIRT BOXES 






ROCKERS, SCREENS, 






DESKS AND 


GAY'S 




BED ROOM CURTAINS 


RELIABLE 




AT 


HARDWARE 




lolinson, Hackett & Guthrie 







smg. 



Vacation Blunders 

Miss E. E., in the comitry: "Listen to that woodpecker 

Her Country Friend: "Sing? He's pecking on a tree." 
Miss E. E.: "Well, it's instrumental music then, isn't it?" 



SHEET MUSIC, MUSIC MERCHANDISE 

TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 

AND SUPPLIES 



19 SOUTH SID9 PUBLIC SQUARB 

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^iminininininiiHiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiniiiiiiiiiiinininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiinitiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiinHiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiinu 



Girls, Patronize our Advertisers 



I Dr. AivByn IvIncoIvN Adams 

I Oculist and Aurist 

I to the State School for the Blind 

I 323 West State Street 



Practice limited to diseases of the 
Rye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



DR. ALPHA B. APPLEBE^K 
Dentist 

326 West State St. 



Another on the Minnesota Visitor at the 
Falls of Minnehaha 

Miss E., looking first at the small volume of water going 
over the falls, then at the seemingly increased volume as it 
fell over the ledge: ''Well, I don't see how such a little stream 
of water has energy to fall so far." 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Beat and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 
Jno. B. Snell, Prop. 
Rate* lla.25, I2.50, and $3.00 per day 
One Block West of Womana College 
Opposite Post OflS>ce 
Rooms with or without bath 
Local and Long Diatance Telephone 

in every room. 

PiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiitiiiiiiMiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



I DR. BYRON S. GAILE)Y 

I EYE, EAR, 

I NOSE AND THROAT 



Office and Residence 
340 West State Street 



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I At Geneva on Stunt Day | 

I Miss F: "Who shall be leader for our mechanical dolls?" | 

I Miss W.: "Well; it will have to be someone who can talk | 

I loud and make up as she goes along." | 

I Miss P.: "Then let Letta do it. I know that she can, | 

I because I sat next to her last year in Logic. | 



Ayers National Bank 

Founded 1852 



Capital 
^^200,000 

Surplus 
$^0,000 




Deposits 

^1,2^0,000 

United States 
Depository 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 

Special Window for Ladies 
Ladies' Waiting- Room 
We make a feature of Ladies' Accounts, and have 
provided facilities for their exclusive use 

OFFICERS 
M. p. Dnnlap, President O. P. Biiffe, Caihier 

Andrew Rassel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Aest. Cashier 

R. M. Hockenhull, Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst. Cashier 

C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 



Owen P. Thompson 
Edward F. Goltra 
I John W. Leach 



DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhull 
M. F. Dnnlap 



Harry M. Capps 
O. F. Bnffe 
Andrew Rnssel 



llllWHiiiiiiunuiiiinuriiiiiniuiniiiiniiiniiiitMiniMniuiiiimniiiiniiiMiiiiniiiiniiiniiiinMiiiiiiininiitMniiiniiiMiiniiiininiiiHiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiritiiiniriiniiiiiir 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1860 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

I College of Liberal Arts 

I (Full classical and scientific courses) 

I College ot Music 

I School of Fine Arts 



School of Expression 

School of Home Economics 

4I,A Standard College — one of the best. 
Regular college and academy courses 
leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 
inently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located 
in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 
dignified, old college town, noted for 
its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking for a good college. 

Call or address. Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, 111. 




^rfWUimUIUMHHUIimilHHIUIIIIIIIUIIUHHIIIIimi«INN«IUHIUIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIII1HllllimiHHIIHmMMIIIHIMIUUUIIIIIIIIIIIHWIimilNmiH«Mmn^ 



tClje College (Greetings 

€11 The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 

i8{| Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
oi all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

<]] Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
<|| Entered ai Jacksonville PostoflSce as second class matter. 

Contents 

Editorial 3 

The New Girls Impression of College Activities .... 4 

At the Top of the Ladder (A Paper) 6 

Going Up . 7 

The Elevator 9 

Elevator Rules 10 

At Lake Matanzas . 12 

A Matanzas Ryrabel 13 

Jokes from Lake Matanzas 14 

History of the College Song 16 

The College Song 17 

The College Sing 18 

Comments on Huxley 18 

Athletic Association 21 

Constitution, Rymbel 22 

The Y. W. C. A 24 

Domestic Science, (Chafing Dish Recipes) 25 

Expression Department 26 

Art Notes , 27 

Music Notes 28 

Library Notes 29 

1 he Alumni 29 

Mrs. Harkers Birthday Party 30 

The College Annual -30 

Report of the College Council 30 

The College Calendar . . -31 

Class Notes , 32 

The Literary Societies 35 



The 

Graphic Arts 

Concern 



The melancholy days are come, the saddest of 
the year, 

Of wailing winds, and naked woods, and mea- 
dows brown and sear. 

Heaped in the hollows of the grove, the 
withered leaves lay dead; 

They rustle to the eddying gust, and to the 
rabbit's tread. 

The robin and the wren are flown, and from 
the shrubs the jay, 

And from the wood top calls the crow, through 
all the gloomy day, 

— Bryant. 




^be College (3reettnQe 

Vol. XVII Jacksonville, 111., November, 1913 No 2 



Faculty Committee— Miss Mothershead, Miss Baker, Miss 

Johnston. 
Editor -Abbie Peavoy 

Associate Editors— Erma Elliott, Helena Munson, Helen McGhee 
Business Managers — Geneva Upp, Winifred Burmeister, Alma 

Harmel 



This has been a month of organizing and reorganiz- 
ing the different departments for college activities. The 
new students have wondered if they should ever get 
through joining and paying dues, the old students have 
wondered when everything should be started and under 
way. At last, every source for student activities has at 
least a good beginning, the Athletic Association has had 
its election and is planning for many stunts heretofore 
unknown at the Woman's College. The Y. W. C. A. 
has its membership roll completed, the Tag Day being 
a very succcessful way of closing the financial support of 
the association, received from dues. The Council has 
had its election and is planning for a busy year. The 
Greetings has its subscription list and mailing list and 
exchange list copied into the ledger. A start has been 
made on the College Annual. The literary societies have 
their membership settled and started earnestly into their 
work. So diffuse has become the branching of interests 
for student activities that not as in other years, can a 
girl take a prominent part in each, but she must center 
her attention on one or two outside interests and give the 
others the minor place. Not even in one can she be 
interested in all departments, but must center upon one; 

Page Three 




tlTije CoUese ^xtttitiQH 



as in the Athletic Association, she must choose and take 
her place, not in every department, but settle upon one 
or two, say the "Hiking Clubs" and the Archery, as her 
major interest. This multiplying and branching of de- 
partments will give more girls a chance to be leaders. 
It will also give each girl a better chance to get into the 
activity in which she is particularly interested. 

The Greetings Box now stands on the shelf outside 
the Greetings office ready for the collection of material 
of all kinds. Use it, subscribers, it was made for your 
benefit as well as for the benefit of our college paper. 

Pads of paper have been printed for the use of the 
contributors to the Greetings. You may have this paper 
to copy your contributions upon by asking for it at the 
Greetings office. 

Several rymbels are printed in this number. The 
idea for the rymbels is taken from those found toward the 
back of the August and September numbers of the Cen- 
tury magazine. 

A NEW GIRL'S IMPRESSIONS OF COLLEGE ACTIV- 
ITIES AS SHOWN BY~HER LETTERS HOME. "" 

Jacksonville, 111., Sept. 20, 1913. 
My Dear Mother: — At last I am at school, after all 
these weeks of anticipation. There were lots of the old 
girls on the train and they were so busy and happy greet- 
ing each other that it made us new girls wish for the time 
when we would be coming back and knowing all of them. 
But we met them and soon felt that we were good friends 
and forgot that we were leaving home to come to a 
strange place. Although it was raining when we arrived 
in Jacksonville, the Y. W. girls met us and brought us up 
to the school. The Y. W. helped us in many ways to 
get settled and kept us from going off to our rooms to 
feel homesick. 

Page Four 



t!Df)e College (Greetings; 



hM 



The first few days we were busy registering, plan- 
ning our work and meeting the teachers. Then, too, 
came the fun of meeting our roommates and fixing up 
our rooms. 

We are meeting new girls all the time in classes, at 
meals, at chapel, or at the many good times we are hav- 
ing. The Y. W. gave a reception Saturday night for the 
new girls, and of course we met many of the girls then. 
The Y. W. meeting is held every Sunday afternoon, so 
you can see what an important part it has in the activities 
of the school. 

I can not help thinking about home, but am so busy 
I haven't time to be really homesick. 
Lovingly, 

JEAN. 

Jacksonville, 111., Oct. 20, 1913. 

Dearest Mother: — When I began to write to you 
every day I did not realize how rushed 1 would be for 
time. Now I find there are many things that seem to 
come before letter writing. 

Our many good times continue. There has been a 
round of picnics, parties, spreads, slumber parties, con- 
certs, and all the good things girls like so well. 

Along with this we have our Athletic Association, 
with enough variety of sports to satisfy all. There are 
tennis courts, and already some of the girls are playing 
with thoughts of the cup awarded at the tournament in 
the spring. Hike clubs have been organized and every 
walk we take will count towards the distance with which 
our club is to be credited at the end of the year. 

Some of the girls are trying their skill in archery; 
others are enthusiastic over basket-ball or gym work. 

I do not want you to think that these other interests 
make us forget the real purpose for which we are here, 
for of course the greater part of our time is spent on our 
studies. At first I thought the hour periods would seem 

Page Five 




Wfit CoUcge (^xtttitiQi 




long, but the work in the class room is so interesting I 
forget the time. Perhaps you remember that theme- 
writing was the bane of my high school days, but now 
even that is losing some of its terrors. Although some 
of the work is hard and different from what I have had 
before, I try to keep the thought of that degree before me. 
Your busy and happy 

JEAN. 

THE TOP OF THE LADDER 

The ladder has always been a most convenient sym- 
bol not only to signify the pursuit of knowledge but great 
efforts in progress of any kind. We who stand at the 
foot of the ladder of college life look up with wonder to 
the dizzy heights where our goal may be found, others 
farther up look down with sympathy on their lower class- 
mates at the same time struggling on their own way, 
while our Seniors are taking the last rounds regretfully 
yet with eagerness to try their knowledge in the wide, 
wide world lying just beyond the top of the ladder. 

Our ladder of liberal education has been constantly 
changing. 

To the old ladder whose rounds were worn by the 
feet of the students of long ago, new rounds have been 
added making our ladder higher and more perfect. Old 
rounds broken have been replaced by stronger, safer ones 
until we are justly proud of our high standard. 

Our ranks too have increased, doubling and tripling 
old records. Sometimes we hear that professions, agen- 
cies, positions are crowded with too many seeking admis- 
sion. A young man once made such a statement to 
Daniel Webster v/ho in reply gave the answer that has 
since become famous, "There is always room higher up." 

In spite of the increase in the attendance of our col- 
leges, our graduates are quite too few. Out in the world 
we should be lost in the host as the handful of King Rich- 
Page Six 



u 


Clje Cottege ^reetinssi 





ard's horsemen in fhe Crusades were again and again lost 
among the hordes of Saracens around them. Last year 
about six or seven thousand American students reached 
the top of the ladder, gaining the coveted cap and diplo- 
ma; in the same year five hundred thousand men, women 
and children were poured into our country from Europe, 
bringing strange ideas of law and custom, landing unor- 
ganized upon a strange land. As Edward Everett Hale 
says, "The products of our Highest Education must leaven 
the whole lump of American life," A great and noble 
task our obligation to our country. 

MARIE MILLER, '16. 

GOING UP! 

Have you ever lived on fifth floor? Even on fourth? 
No? Then lend me your ears, for indeed are you a fit sub- 
ject for enlightenment. 

From a long hall, with doors on either side, three sets 
of long, sinuous, treacherous, malevolent, back-breaking, 
arch-destroying stairs lead down and down and down, until 
the weary wanderer traveling their dreary length, pants heav- 
ily and grasps at the railing for support. 

A bell, a bell, a brazen bell, clangingly tears the tissues 
of our ears. It is the first dinner bell. Aroused to action we 
race madly through drawers and cupboards, ferreting out our 
treasured finery. 

Ply, fly, dear sister, 'tis nearly time for the second bell — ■ 
yes! yes! hook me, oh I pray you, hook me up! What! a 
dweller for two years within these our walls and not yet able 
to make your arms reach from waist to collar bone ? Weightier 
matters concern me; a clean napkin must I seek out. Hook, 
hook thyself, or thou canst not then be hooked to any man! 

We're off! The smooth, carpeted floor urges us along as 
does the hard wood groove the bowling ball. At a wild cry 
we turn to behold a frantic, flapping hand pleading with us 
and the voice begs us to tell Ella to wait. Ella? Visitor? 

Page 6'eyen 



Wi^t CoHtQt Greetings! 



Visiting whom? Ah! a mystery afoot, until this moment we 
never heard that "Ella" was among us. Under our very 
noses sometimes happen strange things and we are none the 
wiser. Nay, the wisest person in school is the blind corridor 
teacher. Pray hasten to relieve the suspense; our minds are 
screwed to the sticking point, and yet they have slipped up on 
Ella. Ella Who— kind friend? 

"Elevator!" she screams, and we faint completely and 
artistically as does the leading lady in the third act, when 
she learns that her rival, the villainess, has a gown exactly 
like hers and has appeared in it first. Only no convenient 
couch or divan have we — only the cold floor and a friendly 
water bucket to lean our alabaster brow upon, the water 
bucket standing sentinel, the water bucket that should be in- 
side. 

Revived and supported by persevering friends, we dash 
around the corner. Those in the front of the procession 
start the cry, '^ait for us!" The next division takes up the 
slogan, until the end of the line — the tie-tying, skirt-hooking, 
belt-adjusting, hair-braiding line, carries it on and up until 
one big vociferous howl is hurled down the shaft after the 
gloating early birds who had caught the worm — the worm — 
"Ella." We groan as we wind along down the torturous stair- 
cases, which are as dust specks in an hour glass to what they 
seem when we return after a hearty breakfast of shredded 
wheat. Here the jam is equal to any subway. "Ten-at-a- 
time, ten-at-a-time, ten-at-a — too many in here," drones the 
keeper of the black barred object of descent. 

We decide to walk. One flight! Why, it isn't so badl 
Two flights! Three flights! Stumbling blocks appear, our 
breath grows short. We cling tenaciously to the railing and 
compel our stiffened, unwilling muscles to drag us on. Four 
flights! Would that we dwelt on fourth floor! Oh how sweet 
it would be to drop our bones in' repose on this cleanly, or- 
derly floor. Fifth floor at last! We hear the trampling, 
stamping, glorifying, healthy, springy tread of those of us 
who were winged of foot and bold of intention — those of us 
Pag« Eight 




^e CoHtQt Greetings; 



who got the elevator up from the basement. We creep along 
on feet that feel as if the tendons were taut almost to snap- 
ping. Our backs feel like cork screws and our minds are 
a whirl with envy and stupefaction. 

All this, however, is as the peck of a humming bird on 
the mountain of glass, to that relish which follows. Belonging 
to an anarchistic society, Ella adopts her own working hours, 
which are wonderfully easy to forget. Then begins the nerve- 
racking, disturbing, befuddling, searching hurry and anxious 
questioning, "Is Ellie running?" — when the card posted on 
Ella's formidable best-black front, declares her to be deaf — 
nay, dead to all supplications and maledictions. Meanwhile, 
there are those of us who suffer from "broken inns" (see F. 
Frazee) and still others of us from broken dispositions, caused 
by inability to adjust our schedule to Ella's, and the frantic, 
imploring, surging, agonizing disappointment of always get- 
ting there too late to be "lifted" or to be "lowered." 

Feril Hess, '15. 

THE ELEVATOR 

From the door that someone had carelessly left ajar 
the elevator sent its grating voice down- the hall. 

"Can it be that you, an old girl, are giving that kind 
of an example? I am not yet so old, but it seems a long 
time since 1 first came here. Why, then, the girls care- 
fully counted ten before my door was shut and then they 
didn't slam it. What is more, they closed it when they 
left me. In those days I was not so commonly used. I 
had a special helper and I had my regular hours of rest. 
But now, alas! things have come to such a pass that I am 
rudely awakened even at midnight to carry some late 
party-goer or hostess upstairs where she should have been 
three hours before. The next time anyone uses me, I 
hope she notices the scars made by jigging on me; and 
by the way, that is one reason why I had such an awful 
electric shock the other night and had to have a new set 

Page Nin* 



^t)f CoUege (^rcetingjai 



of cables put in. I am sure it was as bad as having a 
broken bone set. Besides, it was very expensive and I 
was so ashamed I didn't know what to do. I don't quite 
understand the new guard-rail they've given me, but it is 
necessary, they say, to "close the circuit." So, please, 
everyone keep it closed. And just one more thing. It 
makes me very dizzy to hop back and forth between two 
or three floors unless I rest between times. If you could 
let me make a full trip up and down, I'd be much obliged. 
I really like to carry people — it gives me such a good 
opportunity to study human character. I only ask you 
please to be kind to me and remember my feelings." 

ELEVATOR RULES 

In as much as it is the students of the school that 
derive the greatest benefit from the unrestricted use of 
the elevator, and in that it is their safety that is most 
vitally concerned in keeping the mechanism perfect, we 
infer that there is no one more interested than they in the 
proper and intelligent use of it. But since we are all 
likely to be thoughtless, and in case there are some of us 
who do not understand the treatment the elevator should 
receive, we suggest the following list of elevator rules 
and etiquette: 

I. When there are ten girls in the elevator, it shall 
be considered loaded and no more passengers may be 
taken on until the number is lessened. 

II. The door to the elevator should never be 
"slammed" shut. 

III. When the car is passing one floor, girls waiting 
on the outside should not try to open the door in order to 
arrest its progress. 

IV. Girls should stand quietly in the car while it is 
in motion, for too much moving around jars the machinery 
and strains the cable. 

V. When the car is ready to start from any floor, 

Page Ten 



tlDlje College (greetingfli 




the guard rail should be closed and left closed until the 
car stops. 

VI. The door should always be closed upon leaving 
the car. 

VII. Girls waiting on the outside of the shaft should 
not press the button to call the car while the ropes show 
that it is in motion. Nor should they keep their fingers 
upon the button while the car has stopped to emit passen- 
gers, in the hope of being the first to get the car when 
the door is closed. 

VIII. As a matter of courtesy, if the car, only par- 
tially filled, be passing a floor where girls are waiting to 
get on, the car should be stopped to admit the waiting 
girls. The newcomers will then keep going in the same 
direction as the first passengers until these have left the 
car, before attempting to use it for their own disposal. 

IX. When the car, carrying passengers, stops at 
some floor, the occupants should of course be given time 
to get out before the car is called to another floor. 

X. If the car is stationary at second floor and girls 
at first wish to bring it down, the girls in the car, provided 
there be less than ten, should go down to first floor, before 
attempting to go up. 

XI. Prolonged conversations between someone in 
the car and someone outside the shaft, during the course 
of which the door is kept open, as well as the practise of 
waiting for some late arrival who is seen approaching 
down the hall, should be discouraged — especially during 
congested periods — for the elevator, like the telephone, 
is a party affair, and someone might be waiting impati- 
ently on another floor for the car. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTH WANT, 
MISS COWGILL, 
FREDA FENTON. 
H. M. — "Was the building put in after the elevator 
was built? " 

Page Eleven 



sw 



tKt)e College (Greetings! 



CAMPING AT LAKE MATANZAS 

The upper classmen ceased plotting secretly, and de- 
lightedly gave out the announcement that was enough to 
make the other girls turn green with envy. Two whole 
days and two whole nights at Lake Matanzas were worth 
envying, although some grades for the last day of the 
week were not. Saturday afternoon, October the elev- 
enth, sacks and boxes of eats, trunks of bed clothing, and 
a jolly bunch of Seniors, Juniors and Sophomores with 
their respective class officers were tagged Oak Lodge, 
Lake Matanzas, and loaded onto the train. One girl al- 
most got left behind, but then a little sprinting is great 
exercise for anyone — else. After an hour's jolting, off 
piled the girls into a field and off came the baggage after 
them. It was only through much maneuvering on the 
part of those well versed in geometrical puzzles that 
trunks, suitcases, boxes, gunnysacks, dishpans, umbrellas 
and coffee pots could be piled on the waiting farm wagon. 
In no time at all, the procession — skyscraper wagon in 
the lead, girls following single file, and stopping every 
half step to frantically pull off burrs — made the mile to 
the cottage on the lake. There a schedule was tacked up 
on a bulletin board and every girl fell to with great pep. 
By seven-thirty Oak Lodge was put to rights, double- 
decker bunks and porch cots made up, and a right royal 
smothered-in-onion beafsteak supper served. That even- 
ing and the next day, and the next, rowing, bathing, fish- 
ing, nutting, marshmallow roasting, singing, racing, read- 
ing, lazying, talking at night to keep one's self and others 
warm, giving ghost dances down a moonlit road, climbing 
up to second story bunks without a ladder, frying pan 
cakes, chicken and fish, going to bed promptly at ten 
o'clock, washing dishes, killing snakes, and making rym- 
bels vied with one another for favor. Late Monday after- 
noon twenty-four reluctant people trudged back to the 
three-sides-only station and by-and-by twenty-four mos- 

Page Twelve 




Cde College (Greetings: 



quito-bitten mortals came home to I. W. C. Till their 
dying day the Juniors and Seniors will be proud of their 
happy inspiration — a camping trip at Lake Matanzas. 

A score or less of maidens we, 

And careful chaperone, 
Far from the maddening crowd we'd flee 
At Lake Matanzas v/ould we be, 

Together — not alone. 

A loan we'll take, a bright red coat, 

Our roommate's sweater too. 
Her raincoat for the leaky boat. 
On other's hats we fairly dote. 

We'll leave ours — they are new. 

I knew someone would have to cook. 

I didn't think to be 
The one to toast my face and look 
As though my face for bread I took. 

Please, scullion, pour the tea. 

No tee for golf balls is there here, 

No base for one who heaves 
The baseball forth. I'm glad to hear 
That nuts abound. The water's clear 

And gorgeous are the leaves. 

The table-leaves are scarce, my friend. 

Upon a trunk you'll dine. 
There's oilcloth where the linen ends, 
Marshmallows, Mr. Taylor sends. 

Come on, the water's fine. 

No fine for magazines too late, 

No slips if meals you cut ( ? ) 
And Helen dug the worms for bait 
And cleaned the pans, I beg to state. 

1 found a hickory nut. 



Page Thirteen 




^te College Greetings: 



Nut? Doughnut! Fried at San Souci ! 

Two crocks were just enough, 
So we sent thereward maidens three 
With chicken fried for you and me, 

To the cottage on the bluff. 

No bluff was mine when I declared 

That for our brief abode 
Full seven chickens should be spared. 
The white meat then with those we shared 

Who lugged them down the road. 

We rowed in rowboats Monday morn, 
(And some were none too staunch) 

To rise at six a. m. we'd borne. 

We waited then with angry scorn, 
He says he broke his launch. 

We've launched a custom here this Fall 

We're passing on to you. 
That Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, all 
May flee from Main and Harker Hall, 

This camping stunt to do. 

JOKES FROM LAKE MATANZAS 

M. W. — What is a rymbel — a new kind of waffle? 

Miss A., when the trunks were being loaded on the 
wagon — Put them up on end, to give more room. 

Mr. O. — That's right. Two heads are better than 
one, if one is a cabbage head. 

H. C. — This lake must hold at least fifty gallons. 

M. B. — Oh, no, at least a thousand. 

(The lake is three miles long and one mile wide.) 

H. D. — I love to hear that dog whine. It sounds so 
human. 

Page Fourteen 



^ije College (greetingsf 



H. B, L. — Miss J, have you a cold? 

Miss J. (hoarsely ironical) — No. 

H. B, L. — Well, I'm not familiar with your natural 
voice, so I couldn't tell. 

Conundrum — What speech of Lady Macbeth's did 
Irene quote when she washed her hands after going 
fishing? 

I. C. — It was six feet long. 

A. P. — But spreading vipers aren't that long. 

F. H. — Well, they are when you're frightened. 

F. H. — The red ants here are as big as grasshoppers. 

A. P., to a sun-burned friend — Well, never mind, 
we'll all want some sort of a tradelast to take back. 

M. J., eating fried chicken — Fingers were made be- 
fore forks. 

F. H. — Mine weren't made that long ago. 

A. P. to E. E., in water — Is it dry, Erma? 

M. J. — The water? 

A. P. — No, my bathing suit. 

H. C. to W. B., at the bonfire — If you are not more 
careful, Fritz, you'll make a burning bush of yourself. 

M. W. — Oh, Miss Cowgill, hit your head. Never 
mind, it's gone now. 

Same, a little later — I raised my arm and split it. 

F. H. — This boat leaks so that I'll have to hang my 
feet out in the water to keep them from getting wet. 

Miss A. — Feril, hold on to your foot or you'll go on 
over into the water. 

F. H. — Miss C. is sitting on the leak. 

M. J. — Good idea. Keep the water out. 

Miss C, F. H. and I. C. in one boat — I. C. — We have 
three beauties in this boat. That's why we've had our 
pictures taken so often. 

F. H. — Well, we've one of the Graces anyhow. 

Page Fift«eB 



^ift CoUese <2^reetinss{ 



Three in a bed — Where are you sleeping, Mabel? 

On the rail. 

To make room for Jo? 

C. K., resentfully — No, I'm making the room. 

L. G. was hunting for a missing sweater. 

I. C. — Don't bother to hunt any longer, Lena. 

M. J. — She has it on her mind. 

I. C. — I do believe she has it somewhere. 

THE COLLEGE SONG 

At the annual concert of the Glee Club in 1907, as 
an encore the college song was sung for the first time. It 
was written by Miss Kreider, and dedicated to the college. 
The second verse of the song as it then stood was: 
Belles Lettres and our dear Phi Nu 

What love to both we bear 
If it be a leaf of golden hue. 

Or ivy leaf we wear, 
For thread of blue or link of gold 

Shall bind us close to thee 
And oft thy glories be retold. 
By us o'er land and sea. 
Last year when the new societies were organized this 
stanza became inappropriate. As a second stanza was 
necessary, Miss Miller wrote: 

Hail to our Alma Mater, 

The best in all the land. 
We'll sing her praises ever, 

And by her side we'll stand. 
Her fame for aye, we will unfold, 

Till known to all she'll be, 
And oft her glories be retold 
By us on land and sea. 
When Mrs. Phoebe Kreider heard that the new so- 
cieties had been organized she realized that the second 
stanza she had written was no longer appropriate, and sent 
to Dr. Harker the stanza which is printed second in the 
music. Her first stanza of 1906, her second stanza of 
1913 will now compose our college song. 
Page Sixteen 



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Wi)t CoUcgc <§reetingsi 



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"THE COLLEGE SING" 

"We're coming, we're coming, a gay little band, 
To tell you the big college sing is at hand. 
So lift up your voices and burst into song, 
And you will soon feel that you really belong." 
To make the new girls feel that they really belong is 
the purpose of the annual college sing. The new girls 
enjoy the evening, but not as much as the old girls who 
know what's coming and have a chance to watch to see 
what effect that their solos and choruses have on the sub- 
ject of the ditty. This year in addition to reminding dif- 
ferent members of the faculty of some particular incident 
of recent occurrence, in addition to the solos and general 
songs. Miss Miller and Miss Fenton reproduced the sounds 
of Ehnie's piano for the sum of five cents per number. 
After the closing of the sing with the college song, we 
hope that the new girls did feel that they really belong. 



QUOTATION FROM HUXLEY 

"I protest (he writes) that if some great power 
would agree to make me always think what is true and 
do what is right, on condition of being turned into a sort 
of clock and wound up every morning, I would instantly 
close with the offer." 

Page Eighteen 




tS^tie CoUese <§reettnssi 




This quotation was submitted to the student body for 
their comments on Wednesday evening, October the fif- 
teenth. . One hundred and fifty-two disagreed with Hux- 
ley, twenty-nine agreed, three were indifferent. Some 
of the answers are printed here as they were written: 

I agree with him, because one would have the satis- 
faction and confidence of knowing that what he did would 
be the right thing. This feeling would save much worry 
and nervous strain for the work would be more evenly 
balanced by being a machine like a clock, 

I disagree with Huxley very decidedly. What credit 
would it be to him, and of what influence would he have 
in the world if his good acts came from such a source? 
To be true and right would take positively no effort or 
will power on his part. I much prefer the one that can, 
in spite of all results and opposing forces, judge what he 
thinks right and do it. 

I do not agree with him. Because if a person hasn't 
will power enough to "think what is true and do what is 
right" without being wound up, then he is not worth the 
time it would take to make him a clock. 

I do not agree with him because 1 believe freedom 
of thought and action to be one of the greatest privileges 
of the human race. 

I agree with Mr. Huxley for I think that one would 
feel the freedom from temptation as well as the relief in 
knowing that they were doing right. 

Since we are all likely to err and say or do things 
which cause heartaches and unhappiness, I agree with 
Huxley in that we have some greater power to make us 
do exactly the right thing at all times, thereby making 
everybody happier. 

I do agree because it would settle many questions 
which are now so large and frequently doubtful in my 
mind, though I would hate to feel that it was strictly nec- 
essary to be as a clock in order to think truly. 

I disagree with Huxley for if one were to be wound 

Page Nineteen 




tlTifje College (^reetingK 



up and were sure of doing right, there would be no honor 
in his doing the right things, for he would have no temp- 
tations to fight against. The real good person is the one 
that meets temptation and puts it aside and does the right 
thing. 

I should much prefer to have a mind and a soul in 
my thoughts and actions even though I made many mis- 
takes. Those things which I did get right would be much 
more a part of me and would be worth infinitely more. 

I do not agree with Huxley, because thinking what 
was true and doing what v/as right, would be too mechani- 
cal. I think it is a good thing sometimes to find out what 
is right by having experience with what is not. We are 
then more ready and willing to do the right thing. 

I should not like to be turned into a clock even on 
condition that I should always think and do right, for I 
want the right to do my own thinking and the richness of 
the experience I pass through in deciding my own actions. 
They will not be always wrong, for from the mistakes of 
one time, I learn the right thing to do in another. 

I disagree with Huxley. A person so perfect would 
make those around him miserable and unnatural. He 
could have no S3'mpathy with or for others. He would 
perhaps be a model but not a companion. 

By becoming almost a form of mechanism, one 
might obliterate chances of doing wrong and making 
mistakes, but at the same time see individuality, person- 
ality, power of the will, thought and the accomplishment 
of gaining self control would be lost. I do not think 
there would be so much good done that it would make up 
for the loss of these things and the interest of effort. 

I do not feel that such a mechanical, monotonous 
kind of goodness would touch many hearts or make the 
world much better. I should feel that I could do more 
good if I were not perfect, if I made a few mistakes. 

1 think I do not agree with the author. Although I 
may make many and serious mistakes, I would rather do 

Page Twenty 



^t)e CoQese ^reettngs; 



and act upon my own responsibility, working out my own 
salvation, than reach perfection through any outward con- 
trol. Without the strength and development that comes 
from the conscious working out of my own problems, I 
could not feel justly proud of any good thing I might 
attain. To me it is not the goal that is the only consider- 
ation but the firmness and regularity of the mile posts 
along the way. 

VAST ATHLETIC PROPAGANDA FOR I. W. C. GIRLS 

Practical Side of Gymnasium Drudgery Explained by 
the Athletic Manager. 

(Special to I. W. C. Greetings) 

That I. W. C. is to take the lead among Western 
schools for women in emphasizing the development to 
the woman of "equal rights" was disclosed to a represen- 
tative of the Greetings. Extensive plans are already out- 
lined by those in charge, and gymnasium drudgery is to 
be supplied with a practical incentive. When asked the 
whys and wherefores of this new movement the manage- 
ment denounced as unwarranted the recent alleged physi- 
cal ineligibility of the women to offices heretofore filled 
by "mere men." She proposed, by energetic application 
to such things as archery and tennis — basket-ball and 
base-ball for the more valiant aspirants to physical 
prowess — to fit I. W. C. students for any pugilistic ser- 
vice in the new struggle which must ensue from equal 
suffrage. 

The first mass meeting of the association was held 
September 29. Appointment of sport captains was made 
by Miss Peril Hess. 

Archery — Irene Crum. 

Tennis — Louise Hughes. 

Base-ball — Ruth Mattocks. 

Hiking Club — Freda Fenton. 

Basket-ball — Geneva V. Upp. 

Page Twenty-one 




HDte College ^vutinzi 




Each of the new captains gave a short talk outlining 
the different sports. 

Miss Hess appointed Miss Johnston, Ruth Want and 
Geneva Upp to write a new constitution for the associa. 
tion. 

On October 3 was held the election of officers. 

President — Geneva Upp. 

Vice-president — Lena Gumerson. 

Treasurer — Esse Summers. 

Secretary — Marie Miller. 

The new constitution was read and accepted. 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION OF ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

Article I. 

This organization shall be known as The Athletic 
Association of Illinois Woman's College. 

Article II. 
^(a) The officers of this association shall be Presi- 
dent, Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer. 

(b) The duties of these officers shall be such as 
usually pertain to those positions. 
Article III. 

Any student of either College or Academy, any fac- 
ulty member, the Dean, and the President of the College 
shall be eligible to membership in this association. 
Article IV. 

The officers of this Association shall constitute an 
Executive Committee, together with the Athletic Director 
and one other member of the Faculty, who shall be chosen 
by the other members of the committee. 

Article V. 

Sport captains shall be chosen by the Executive Com- 
mittee to form a committee in charge of the different 
sports engaged in by the Association. The Athletic Direc- 
tor shall also be a member of this committee. This corn- 
Page Twenty-two 




tEi^t CoUes^ ^reettnsst 




mittee shall meet with the Executive Committee upon 
request. 

Article VI. 

There shall be a committee on Finance, whose chair- 
man shall be the Treasurer of the Association. She shall 
recommend members for this committee, to be approved 
by the Executive Committee. 

BY-LAWS 
Article I. — Meetings 

This Association shall meet during the second week 
in May of each year for the election of officers for the 
following year. These officers shall assume their duties at 
the opening of the College year. 

There shall be a meeting the second Wednesday of 
the first semester to complete the organization for Fall 
activities. 

Article II. — Dues 

The dues for the year shall be fifty cents. No mem- 
ber whose dues for the year are unpaid shall be permitted 
to take part in any competitive sports conducted by the 
Association. 

ARCHERY 
A Rsrmbel 

In chapel she arose to speak 

From out the Sophomore row. 
She told them how from day to week 
They might the arrow aim, and eke 

Essay to bend the bow. 
The beau ! It touched a hidden chord 

Within each maiden breast. 
The laughter rose and swept and soared. 
They giggled first, and then they roared. 
They heeded not the rest. 
E. W. — Will it be all right for me to shoot my gym 
hour away? 

Page Twcaty-thrM 




tS^e College Greetings; 



Y. W. C. A. 

The past month has been a very active one in the 
Association, according to the President's calendar. The 
devotional topics and leaders have been: 

"What it Means to be a Y. W. Girl"— Ruth Want, 
leader. 

"Ambitions for the Year" — Peril Hess, leader. 

"Recognition Service" — Helena Munson, leader. 

"The Art of Adaptability" — Abbie Peavoy, leader. 

At the Recognition Service of October fifth over one 
hundred and ten girls took the Y. W. pledge as new 
members. 

The first open business meeting was also held this 
month. At this meeting each of the cabinet members 
gave in brief outline the work of her department, in this 
way suggesting to the new girls the work done by Y. W. 
in its differing activities. Peril Hess, chairman of the 
cabinet's newest committee explained to both old and new 
girls the significance of the committee of Social Service. 

Miss Hess was sent as representative of our associa- 
tion to the first convention of the Central Field held at 
Chicago from the seventeenth to the nineteenth of 
October. 

Esther Fowler, the treasurer, superintended a very 
successful "Tag Day" this month. Almost every Y. W. 
girl wore a little yellow tag saying, "My dues are paid. 
Are yours.? " That it was a labor-saving device was proved 
by the fact that one hundred and twenty dollars were re- 
ceived for dues alone on that day. 

On the evening of October twenty-seventh Lena 
Gumerson, chairman of the Missions Committee, presented 
the Association pageant, showing something of what the 
Y. W. does in China and South America, The parts were 
carefully worked out and well presented. After the play 
the students were served with tea in true Chinese style. 
Fage Tweni7-f<mr 




tKfie CoHege (Jlreetings 



"GOOD FOR SATURDAY NIGHT SPREADS" 
CHAFING DISH RECIPES 



Tomato Rarebit 




INGREDIENTS 

2 tablespoons butter 

2 tablespoons flour 

f c. thin cream 

f cup stewed and strained 

tomatoes 
^ teaspoon soda 
2 cups finely cut cheese 
2 eggs slightly beaten 
salt 

mustard 
cayenne 
METHOD 
Put butter in chafing dish. When melted, add flour. 
Pour on gradually, cream, and as the mixture thickens add 
tomatoes, mixed with soda, then add cheese, eggs, and 
seasoning to taste. Serve as soon as cheese has melted 
on toast. 

Cheese Dreams 

Bread cut in slices as for toast. Butter and spread 
with cream cheese, cut in desired shape and brown in 
hot butter or they may be toasted. 

Caramel Fudge 

INGREDIENTS 
2 c. sugar 1 c. milk 

^ c. barley sugar 2 tablespoons butter 

2 c. sugar 1 teaspoonful vanilla 

METHOD 
In making barley sugar, place sugar in pan and melt 

Page Twenty-five 




tE'f}t CoUtse ^rtttinQSi 



over fire, stirring constantly until smooth and of light 
brown color. Heat sugar and milk to the boiling point. 
Add barley sugar and cook to the medium hard ball stage 
(a little beyond the soft ball stage). Add butter and 
flavoring, cool 5 min. and beat until stiff. Put on a but- 
tered plate and pot until smooth and shiny on top and 
about 1 inch thick. Cut into 1 inch squares. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

The increasing interest in the science and art of 
home making is shown by the large number of students 
now studying Home Economics. There are eighty-six 
registered for whole or part time work, several of these 
students having entered for the regular B. S. degree course. 

A technical class in cookery for the women of Jack- 
sonville has been formed as several wished to come in for 
special work. This class meets on Wednesdays and 
Fridays at ten-thirty. 

Much new equipment has been added to the food 
laboratory to complete the furnishing of the desks for 
full classes. 



EXPRESSION NOTES 

Miss Helen J. Allen, the new assistant in the depart- 
ment of Expression comes to us with especial honors. She 
is a graduate of the Elmira College for Women, and the 
Greely School of Dramatic Art. She taught at Elon Col- 
lege, North Carolina, and at Tudor Hall, Indianapolis. 
Her unusual ability and her experience in teaching make 
her a welcome addition to the department. 

Classes in History of Oratory and Stage Management 
have been organized. 

Page Twenty-six 



Wi)t CoUege (greetingfli 



Among our new students who have enrolled for the 
full course in expression are Hazel Ingram, Naomi Davis, 
Eloise Williams and Bertha Allen. 

A class in criticism will meet once a week during 
the entire year. Because of the unusually large enroll- 
ment much interest is manifested in this phase of the work. 

ART DEPARTMENT 

Miss Knopf spent six weeks of the summer at Ogun- 
quit, Maine, painting in the summer school of Charles H. 
Woodbury. She has returned with some sketches and 
pictures which will be exhibited for the faculty and stu- 
dents sometime in the near future. 

Mildred Brown, graduate of the School of Fine Arts, 
1911, has been appointed to the position of supervisor 
of public school drawing at Winfield, Kansas. 

The department opens with a large enrollment. 
Among those who are taking the full art courses are: 
Dorothy Stevens, Ruth Miller, Evelyn Nelch, Sarah May 
and Lucy Royse. 

A class in poster designing will be organized in the 
near future. 

Miss Knopf went to Chicago on the 2 3rd to see the 
exhibition of pictures by Birge Harrison and Alexander 
Harrison, two of our most prominent American landscape 
painters. 

Word just reaches us that Winnie Sparks — graduate 
of School of Fine Arts, 1910 — has been appointed super- 
visor of drawing in the public schools of Pontiac. The 
position reflects credit upon Miss Sparks and upon the 
quality of work done in our art department in its prepara- 
tion for teaching. 

Page Twenty-seTen 





-■ " -V ' '^i.''.^^' i^*» " ' ■ -1 ' ■■■—1' ■ 


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U^ UJCJ 7 (i^=^ 



Everyone is looking forward to the joint recital to be 
given November third by Miss Marie Edwards, pianist, and 
Cornelius Van Vliet, leading concert cellist of America to- 
day. Miss Edwards was here two years ago as accom- 
panist for Francis McMillan, violinist. 

The Glee Club has been formed with a large enroll- 
ment under the direction of Miss Estelle McKay, the newly 
acquired teacher of voice. The following officers were 
elected: 

President — Nina Slaten. 

Vice-President — Louise Hughes. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Johanna Onken. 

A class in analytical harmony has been formed with 
an enrollment of twenty-five, under the direction of Miss 
Hay. 

Mr. William Preston Phillips, a former faculty mem- 
ber of this school, who during the past year has been 
studying in Paris under the direction of Oscar Seagle, was 
a visitor at the College of Music. His voice has gained 
much in tonal quality and his interpretations have broad- 
ened remarkably. 

The Class in Solfeggio, one of the complimentary 
courses offered to students of the College of Music, is 
under the direction of Miss Beebe. 

The new class in Form and Analysis, under Mr. 
Donald Swarthout, has been organized. It promises to 
be a splendid addition to the already strong course of 
theoretical studies offered by the College of Music. 

The music department has recently received a sub- 
stantial appropriation which will be used to buy musical 

Page Twenty-eight 




Wi}t CoQese (ilreetmgft 



reference books and increase the library of Ensemble 
music. Also this provides a case to accommodate the 
music used by the Ensemble classes. Four classes in 
Ensemble playing have already been organized under the 
personal direction of Director and Associate Director 
Swarthout. 

OUR LIBRARY 

This is to announce that our library is growing. 
Slowly, but surely, we trust. The College Guild has 
voted $35.00 for the purchase of books; we have added 
a new book stack; have a new desk for our Britannica; 
and have ordered two new tables for the reading room. 

The largest gift since the opening of school has been 
the entire library of their father given by T. H. and R. R. 
Buckthorpe. 

No one can better understand the need of a larger 
library than the girls who have gone out from the College, 
and to these we appeal for help in our effort to bring it 
up to the standard already attained by other departments 
of our school. 

We need more copies of the standard fiction, Dick- 
ens, Thackeray, Eliot, Hawthorne, Scott and others, and 
also copies of the short story writers, Ruth McEnery 
Stuart, Thomas Nelson Page, Richard Harding Davis, 
Garland, Mary E. Wilkins, E. E. Hale, VanDyke, Aldrich, 
Kipling, Stockton, etc. And again, more copies of 
Shakespeare, single plays preferred; standard biographies, 
standard poets, and we might lengthen the list indefinitely. 

May we not count on the readers of the Greetings 
to read, reflect and act on this suggestion.? 

ALUMNAE NOTES 

Miss Lucile Rottger was married October the first to 
Mr. H. D. Lewis, a young lawyer. They will make their 
home in Rushville, Illinois. 

Miss Mildred West has secured a position as teacher 
of modern languages at Westfield, Illinois. 

Page Twenty-nine 



^t)c CoUege Greetings! 



OUR BABIES 

The College has two new babies, Marjorie Elizabeth 
Wackerle, daughter of Ed and Alice Wackerle, was born 
October the second. A little son was born to Mrs. Frank 
Wolter (Sue Wackerle) October the third. 

Mary Katherine Gore, daughter of Mrs. W. A. Gore, 
(formerly Hortense Campbell of the class of 1907) took 
first prize at the Jacksonville Chautauqua this summer as 
being the best all around baby. 

BIRTHDAY PARTY 

Mrs. Marker was pleasantly surprised by a gathering 
of the house faculty in honor of her birthday, Tuesday 
night after chapel. Mrs. Metcalf and Miss Wackerle, the 
planners of the surprise, served delicious refreshments. 
When Ruth Harker and Mildred Barton brought in the 
birthday cake covered with candles. Miss Watson very 
much alarmed the party by extinguishing, at a single 
breath, the light of every one. 

^? 
THE COLLEGE ANNUAL 

The class of 1915 have consented to undertake the 
editorship of the first College Annual. They desire to 
have it well understood that they are not attempting a 
class year book but a college annual, which should re- 
ceive the support of every student and faculty member 
in the College. 

THE COLLEGE COUNCIL 

At four-fifteen October the first a meeting was called 
of the College Council for the purpose of hearing Dr. 
Marker's greeting. On the following Wednesday the 
Council held its annual election. Peril Mess was elected 
president; Melen McGhee, vice-president; Letta Irwin, 
secretary; Hallie Clem, treasurer. The first business of 

Page Thirty 




tKlje CoUege ^reetingg 



the council was to ask for chapel time on Friday for a 
mass meeting- for an election of the Athletic Association. 
At the suggestion of the Council, Dr. Marker added an 
amendment to the constitution, providing an executive 
committee to confer with Dr. Marker and Miss Mothers- 
head. 

A committee was appointed to draw up a code of 
rules for the use of the elevator. 

THE COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Sept. 30. Breakfast late! 

Oct. 1. First meeting of the College Council. 

First number of Greetings out ( ? ) . 
Oct. 2. The editor begins to explain that the Greet- 
ings etc. 

Athletic Association election. 

Proof for October Greetings comes down. 

Phi Nu party. 

Y. W. C. A. recognition service. 

Greetings proof returned. Greetings will be 
out soon. 

Junior-Senior picnic at Gravel Springs. 

Academea picnic at Nichols Park. 
Oct. 8. College Council elects officers. 
Oct. 10. Anniversary of The Founding of The College. 

Greetings staff meets. The October number 
will be out October 13. The circulation 
manager engages carriers. 

Lambda Alpha Mu party at Colonial Inn. 

Y. W. C. A, missionary program. 

Camping party starts for Matanzas. 

Campers return. Greetings out? 

Material for November Greetings begins to 
come in. 

Freshmen appear in chapel. 
Oct. 15. Council meeting. 

Page Thirty-one 



Oct. 


3. 


Oct. 


4. 


Oct. 


5. 


Oct. 


6. 



Oct. 


11. 


Oct. 


12. 


Oct. 


13. 


Oct. 


14. 




^Ije CoUege ^rectingsf 



Oct. 


18. 


Oct. 


20. 


Oct. 


21. 


Oct. 


23. 


Oct. 


2 7. 



Belles Lettres party. 

Greetings material given to printer. 

Seniors appear in caps and gowns. 

Founders' Day. 

Y. W. C. A. Pageant. 

CLASS OF 1914 

President — Hallie Clem. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Clara Kelley. 

There is one day in the first semester when the Sen- 
iors feel that they are Seniors. That is the day when 
they, escorted by the Sophomores, follow the capped and 
gowned faculty into the chapel, having themselves 
donned for the first time their own caps and gowns. It 
is a solemn time for them, the music, the singing of class 
hymns and Dr. Marker's address to them, always make 
the day a remembered day of the Senior year. 



CLASS OF 1915 

President — Josephine Ross. 

Vice-President — Winifred Burmeister. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Louise Harries. 

The Juniors are very glad to increase their numbers 
by the addition of several of our last year's Home Eco- 
nomics Seniors, who have come back to I. W. C. to study 
for their B. S. 

On Monday, October sixth, the Junior and Senior 
classes had a very enjoyable outing at Gravel Springs. 
The trip was made in a hack by all except Miss Johnston 
and Helen Dinsmore, who for reasons of their own pre- 
ferred to walk part of the way. At noon those who had 
survived the smoke of the bonfires had a picnic dinner. 
Just before returning home the party was shown through 
the Gravel Springs plant nad given a view of the spring 
itself. 



Page Thirty-two 



Wiit CoUege (Greetings 



SOPHOMORE NOTES 

The newly elected officers of the Class of 1916 are: 

President — Lucile McCloud. 

Vice-President — Margaret Coultas. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Mary Baldridge. 

The class is very proud to increase its total number 
to thirty-six by the addition of several Sophomores from 
other colleges and by the re-classification of a few College 
Specials. 

Miss Cowgill was the guest of honor at a jolly feast 
given October the eighth to welcome her as the class 
officer of 191 6. 



FRESHMAN NOTES 

The Class of 1917 has the largest membership on 
record. According to the Dean's revised list there are 
seventy-five Freshmen. 

The Freshman class officer is Miss Dudley. An 
enthusiastic class meeting was held at which the following 
offficers were chosen for the year: 
President — Esther Fowler. 
Vice-President — Johanna Onken. 
Secretary — Winifred Robison. 
Treasurer — Esse Summers. 

At chapel Tuesday morning, October the fourteenth, 
the Freshmen gave their ''stunt." Dressed in red and 
white, they marched in from each side of the chapel, 
whistling, the class colors of red and white forming a 
canopy over them. Massing together in front of the fac- 
ulty, they began to sing: 

The Freshman class is coming fast, '17, '17 
Beneath the red and white we pass, 
Class of '17! 
We stand for work, 
We stand for fun, 
We mean a four-year race to run, 
Loyal-Loyal-Loyalty — Class of '17! 

Page Thirty-three 



^l)c CoUege ^xtttinzs 




The Freshman class is "rushed" to death, 

Picnics — parties 
And run to get our light "per" for 

Chemistry and Math, 
Though here to work for our B. A,, 
We really want our dear M. A. 
Loyal-Loyal-Loyalty — Class of '17! 

They were heartily applauded, even the little dog 
that had wandered into the chapel added an enthusiastic 
bark. 

COLLEGE SPECIALS 

The enrollment of the College Specials was greatly 
increased this year. We were all very much pleased to 
have Miss Parsons for our class officer. The following 
girls were elected for officers of the class: 

President — Freda Fenton. 

Vice-President — Sieverdena Harmel. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Louise Hughes. 

We were very sorry to hear of Miss Harmel's seri- 
ous illness and are hoping for her rapid recovery. 

The Specials were entertained by Miss Parsons and 
Miss Fenton on Monday, October the sixth, in Miss Par- 
son's studio. Progressive conversation was the main 
feature of entertainment and the afternoon was greatly 
enjoyed by all. 

The officers and President's committee spent a de- 
lightful evening with Miss Parsons last Monday. A little 
business was transacted and plans discussed for the com- 
ing year. 

ACADEMY NOTES 

The initial meeting of the First Year Academy was 
held September twenty-seventh. Miss Ireland, acting as 
chairman, held an election of officers. The following 
were chosen: 



Page Thirty-four 



Cfie CoUege ^reetingg 



President — Jessie Wall. 
Vice-President — Mary Cosart. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Blanche Dickens. 

Second Academy Officers 

President — Ruth Marker. 
Vice-President — Catherine Long. 
Secretary — Julia Stuckey. 

Third Academy 

President — Nellie Rives 
Vice-President — Marguerite Watson. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Madeline Laud. 

Fourth Academy Officers 

President — Ruth Alexander. 
Vice-President — Edna Kessler. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Lora Whitehead. 

Academy Specials 

President — Maud Alice Drake. 
Vice-President — Blanche Da}^ 
Treasurer — Evelyn Nelch. 
Secretary — Eloise Strubinger. 

SOCIETY NOTES 
Phi Party 

The annual Phi Nu party in honor of the new girls 
was given Saturday evening, October the fourth, at the 
home of Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Miller, 876 West State 
street. The entertainment of the evening was based 
upon the mythical origin of the Phi Nu society as por- 
trayed in a clever little play written by Abbie Peavoy. 
The origin of the "Scatterers of Light," as the play was 
called, was symbolized by the union of the real and the 
ideal, resulting from the marriage of Prince Loyal of the 
earth and Princess Light of Fairyland. The woodland 
effect was carried out in the decorations of autumn leaves, 
vines and goldenrod. At the conclusion of the wedding 
the guests were invited to partake of the banquet served 
in honor of the Prince and Princess. 

Page Thirty-five 




I fj tlTfje CoUege (Jlreetingsi 

The cast of characters is as follows: 

King Ancient — Erma Lytle Elliott. 

Prince Loyal — Peril Hess, 

Princess Light — Irene Crum. 

Druid — Winnifred Burmeister. 

Herald — Lena Gumerson. 

Magician — Ruth Reavis. 

Gnome Wealthy — Marie Miller 

Princess' Attendant — Mildred Barton. 

Fairies — Happy, Ethlyn Wisegarver; Peace, Corinne 
Hughes; Mischief, Elysabeth Metcalf; Propriety, Ruth 
Mattocks. 

Pages — Ruth Harker, Genevieve Speice. 

Theta Sigma Party 

Amidst the tooting of whistles, calls of the sailors, 
ringing of bells and pulling in of the gang plank, the 
Theta Sigma yacht on Monday evening, September twen- 
ty-ninth, set sail from San Francisco on a sight-seeing 
trip around the world. We sailed due west, stopping first 
at Japan, where a charming Japanese girl sat drinking tea 
in her little garden. After receiving several wireless 
messages the yacht sailed on to Spain, there seeing the 
famous dark-haired dancing girl with her tambourine. A 
short voyage then brought us to Havre where we had a 
glimpse of a bewitching little French doll. Charmed by 
the music of Schumann-Heink, we almost forgot ourselves 
when we caught sight of a coy little Hollander. We hur- 
ried up the English channel to catch a glimpse of a truly 
Scotch Highlander in her kilted skirt and famous plaids. 
Almost before we knew where we were there appeared 
a flash of green and a daughter of the Emerald Isle waved 
at us. She had no sooner passed from view when we 
heard the firm click of the low heels of our English suf- 
fragette. 

We had almost reached the United States again 

Page Thirtj-tiz 



Wi)t CoOese 4^reetings( 




when the stewardess announced dinner in the saloon 
(sewing rooms) to which the guests were guided by jolly 
tars. Here, in an almost real saloon, with even the port- 
holes, at little tables with boats in the centers, the guests 
were served by real Academea sailors. 

Lambda Alpha Mu Notes 

The Lambda Alpha Mu open meeting was held Octo- 
ber the seventh. Besides several numbers by members of 
the music department, a century of dress was discussed 
in verse and prose and illustrated by a number of girls in 
costumes. 

Lambda Alpha Mu was at home to about one hun- 
dred and thirty guests on October eleventh at the Colo- 
nial Inn, 

Academea Society 

At last we have an abiding place in the old Y. W. 
alcove and, needless to say, we are very proud of it, 

October the sixth, in company with our new friends, 
we spent a pleasant afternoon and evening at Nichols 
Park. A large camp-fire over which we cooked our sup- 
per was the chief attraction of the evening. 

T he special guests were Miss Mothershead, Miss 
Stevenson, Miss Nicholson, Miss Berger, and Mr, and Mrs. 
Metcalf, We were very sorry that Dr. and Mrs. Marker 
could not accompany us. 

Tuesday, October the fourteenth, our open meeting 
was held in Phi Nu hall. Miss Irene Sandberg, one of 
our old members, was among those on the program. 



Page Thirty-seyen 



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I THE TWENTY DEPARTMENTS in our store are 

I just iike twenty little stores, every one devoted to 

I the sale and display of articles FOR THE Modern 

I Woman's wear. 

I Each Department makes a determined and successful 

I effort to show first the attractive new styles 

I of the season. You'll find shopping- pleasant 

I here. 



Kid Gloves 
Neckwear 
Fabric Gloves 
lyinen 

White Goods 
Notions 
I^aces and 

Embroideries 



Corsets 
Art Goods 
Petticoats 
Handkerchiefs 
Ribbons 
Toilet Goods 
Jewelry and 



Knit Underwear 
Hosiery 

Children's Wear 
Muslin Underwear 
and Waists 
Coats and Suits 
Dresses 



I,eather 



LADIES* AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 




FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

Footwear for all occasions — 
Street Shoes 

Dress Slippers 

Bed-room Slippers 

iH o F :p E i^ s' 

We Repair Shoes 



J. A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER 



THE COLLEGE STORE 



I Pennants, Stationery, Tennis Goods, Drug's, School 

I Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory 

I Books and Photo Albums 

I "PLrEASED customers" — OUR MOTTO 

I Goods Delivered 

I Phones: Illinois 57a, Bell 457 Corner South Main St. and Square | 

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Otto Speith 
IPboto iportratture 



Our Portraits were accepted and hung at the National Convention 
in Kansas City 1913 



Formerly Watson Studio 



Southwest Corner Square 



Seraphina (when asked to join Y. W.) — Yes, I'd 
like to join, but I already belong to the Athletic Associa- 
tion. 



Goto 
MULLENIX & HAMILTON 

For Everything Sweet 

Hot and Cold Sodas 

216 East state Street 



Coover& Shreve| 

Have a complete line of | 

Drugs, Kodaks, Perfumes, [ 
Stationery and Holiday Gifts| 

We do Developing" & Printing"| 

Bast and West Side Square | 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii I iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii II iiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii I iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiS 



^iiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiuii irniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiniii miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimii! 

I The most dainty thing's in Ringfs and Jewelry. 

j New and handsome styles of gfoods in Sterling- Silver 

I Highest g-rades of Cut Glass, and every 

I description of Spectacles and Eye Glasses 

I Fine Diamonds a Specialty 

I at 

I RUSSELL&LYON'S 

I The Oldest Established Jewelry House in Central Illinois 

I West Side Square 

I Both Phones 96 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say 

We can furnish your 

Shoes and Party Slippers 

in the popular styles, 

leathers, and 

fabrics 



All the Faculty, Students and Friendi 
of the College should have a Checking 
or Savings Account with 

F. G. FARRELL & CO. 

BANKERS 

F. E. Farrell, President 

E. E. Crabtree, Vice-President 

H. H. Potter, Cashier 

M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier 



Seraphina Smith (at the evangelistic service). Mr. 
Rees — "Is your name Brown?" Seraphina — "No, 
Jones. I mean Smith." 



#rapf)ic 
Concern 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAE OCCASIONS 



^iHHiwnHiniHiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiuiiMiiMiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniMiMiiiiniiiiMiiiiiiiiiuiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiniMiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiniiiii 



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I For those who discriminate | 

i We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to | 

I please the students who come to our city. We select only the | 

i best materials and prepare them with skilful) loving care. | 

I Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and I 

I Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. | 

I Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all | 

I College functions. | 

Vickery Sn Merrigan | 

I OAXEREFtS I 

1 227 West State Street | 



|6oth Phones 309 



I SAFEST PIvACE TO TRADE 

|fjlLLERBY'§ 

I DRY GOODS STORE 



West Side Square 



Brady Bros. | 

Kverythiugf in Hardware andj 
Paints [ 



Seraphina (at a spread to an upper class girl) — So 
you can make your own clothes and cook. You are 
really quite domesticated, aren't you? 

Now, what will Seraphina do next.? 



I The Jacksonville National Bank 

I invites your business 

I Capital . . . $200,000 
I Surplus . . 34,000 

I Deposits . , . 1,100,000 

I U. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 




jACKSONVtLLXt iUL* 

Established 1890 



I Julius K. Strawn, President 

I Chas. B. Graff, Cashier 

I Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear 

I H. J, Rogers, A. A. Curry 

I J. R. Robertson 

4IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIHIIIIII Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlf 



Low Prices Square Dealing" 
Keep us busy 



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Coats, Suits and Skirts tailored to your individual | 

measure and form at I 

r 

3 
X 

POPULAR PRICES j 

All work made in our own shop by expert workmen. We | j 
guarantee to fit you. | 

s 
s 
s 

JACKSONVILLE TAILORING COMPANY 



233 East State Street 



Opposite Pacific Hotel 



Miss H. Parsons (selling books) — "Now, have you 
all passed in your checks? " 



HARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL CO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers, 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhousea, South Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greenhouse!, Bell 775 



McGinn IS' i 

The Young Ladies' Shoe Store | 

See the "BABY DOLL SHOE."| 
It's the Latest. | 

We carry a full line of Bvening Slippers| 
in all colors. | 

If it's new, we have it | 

JAS. McGINNIS & CO. I 

East Side Square | 

s 
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Want 

Cut flowers 



F 
E 

R 

N 



FROM 



JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

Both Phones 



Classy Styles 
We will be pleased to show you our line 

FROST & NOLLEY 

Fashionable Footwear 

For All Occasions 
33 South Side Sq. Jacksonville, 111. 



COTRELL & LEONARD | 

AlvBANY, N. Y. I 



MAKERS OF 

CAPS 

GOWNS and 
HOODS 



To the American Colleges and Univer- | 
sities irom. the Atlantic to the Pacific. | 
Class contracts a specialty. | 




Miss Baker (in Hamlet) — "At the cocking of the 
crow the ghost disappeared." 



Seraphina (joining the Athletic Association) — Will 
I have to take gym if I take athletics ? 



I Dorwari Market. 

I AIvL, KINDS OF 

iFRESH and SALT ME)ATS 
I FISH, POULTRY, Etc. 

I Both phones 196 230 W. State St. 



KODAK FINISHING ! 

Vulcan Roll Films | 

Cameras from $2.00 up 1 

Everything- strictly first class | 

Vail & Vail | 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 B. Side Sq. | 



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PHOTOGRAPHER 



I Successor to McCullough Bros. 



E)ast Side Square 



I Cameras^ Films, Papers, 

I Photo Supplies for Kodakers 
iDeTeloping, Printings and Mountings 
I at reasonable prices 

I Armstrongs Drug Store 

I South West Corner Square 



S. S. Kresge Co 

5c & IOC Store 

New and Up-to-Date 



In Art History. L. C. — "Well, the entrance to the 
pyramids was from the outside," 



Ask your grocer for 

HOLSUM 



BRE)AD 



I Made Clean. Delivered clean 
I in waxed paper wrappers 



flinillllllUIHIIinHIIIIIIIIMIIHIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIMHIIIIIMIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIUIinillllllllllllllltlimillHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinilllllllHIIIIIIIIHIIIIHU 



H. J. «& L. M. SMITH 

Art Needle Work 
and Millinery 

an West state Street 



iMiiiriiiiiiiiniiiimiiininimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiMiiiHiiniiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiMiiHiiiiiiiiniiiHiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 

iN-rE:c3F?n-Y | 

Vt have boilt up our GROQERY and DRUG Departments on a solid! 
)undation of INTEGRITY. In our GROCERY and DRUGS WEI 
AY WHAT WE BELIEVE, and our customers BELIEVE WHATf 
7E SAY. Every item in our store is an example of PURE FOOD,! 
:LEAN FOOD, GOOD FOOD and BEST DRUGS* I 

)URS is a GROCERY AND DRUG STORE with a CONSQENCq 

•honei800 I^OIBIBIE^TS IBIE^OS- Phono 800 1 

Grocery—Pharmacy | 

29 South Side Sq. | 



Pictorial Review Patterns 

For Sale at 



DRY GOODS STORE 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 I 

A. L. Bromley I 

Ladies' Tailor j 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and | 
Repairing. Ladies' Man Tail- | 
ored Suits to order. Remodeling | 
of all kinds. Special rates to | 
I. W. C. students. All work j 
called for and delivered promptly | 



M. B. (preparing to learn to tat) — "What size throt- 
tle shall I buy?" 



111. Phone 57 



Bell Phone 92 



Fresh Drugs, 
Fancy Goods 
Stationery 



Mw DroQ Store 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



a doors West of Postoffice 
235 B. SUte Street 

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'jjHiiNiiiiiiiiiiiMiiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiriiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

I It will pay you to visit 

I SCHRAM'S 

I Jewelry Store 

! COLLEGE PINS, RINGS, SPOONS, ETC. 



Len G. Magill 
Printer 

Baat State Street 111. Phone 418 



"T AYLOR'^ 

Grocery 

A good place to trade 
221 West State Street 



To L. I. — "So you take pipe organ and piano, too. 
Why, your name will be on all of the programs. You'll 
be a real figure head. Won't you? " 



I Montgomery & Deppe 

i IN THEIR NEW PLACE ON THE WEST SIDE OF 
I THE SQUARE ARE SHOWING 

I EVERYTHING IN 

I Dry Goods and Ready-to-Wear Garments 

I Telephone for the Fall Catalog-ue 

^iiiiiniMiniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiitiiniiiMiiiiiiiiniiriiiiiitiiiiMiiiiiiiiiMniiiiHiinMniiiMiiiiniiiMiiiiiiMiiiniiinMiiiiiiiniiiiHiiiiiniiHiiniHnHiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



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College Jewel rv j 

Engraved Cards and Invitations | 

Chafing Dishes, Copper and Brass Goods i 

Special Die Stationer/ i 

21 South Side Square | 



Piepeniirings Variety Store 

One block east of College 

HERE TO PLEASE 

Candies Cakes 

Cookies Pies 

Sandwiches Pop on Ice 

Groceries California Fruits 
School Suppiies 




bIr^hI? 



Jacksonville's foremost Men's Store i 

Mackinaw and Sweater Coatsi 

Mannish Cut and Form Fitting | 

Hand Bags, Suit Cases and I 
Trunks | 

I. W. C. Banners and Pillowsf 
SPECIAL DESIGNS ON REQUEST | 



M. S. (in Art History) — "The Assyrian sculpture was 
mostly in baa-relief." 



ladies' Late Style Sweater 
Coats 



Are Sold by 



"rank Byrns 



Hat 
Store 



iiiMiuimiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiii mil ui„ iiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



C. S. MARTINI 

Wall Paper, Painting | 

and Interior Decorating | 

Pictures and Frames I 

314 W. state St., Scott Block | 

Jacksonville, 111. | 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIINHIHIIIIIINI'c 



JiiiniHiiiMiiiiniiMiiMMiHiiniiiMniiiiiMiiMniiniiiiiMiiiiiiiiiinMMiiiiinitMiinHininiiiiiiiiiiHMriiMniiMiiiiinHiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiMiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Cafe 



Confectionary 



Ibeacock Inn 



Catering- 



Soda 



Candies 



i SKIRT BOXES 

I ROCKERS, SCREENS, 
I DESKS AND 

i BED ROOM CURTAINS 



AT 



iJohnson, Hackett & Guthrie 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



R. P. — "They cannot raise tobacco in New England 
so they raise wool." 



i SHEET MUSIC, MUSIC MERCHANDISE 

I TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 

I AND SUPPLIES 

I 19 SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE 
?HiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiuMiiiiHiHiiiii^ 



LMHniiiniiHHiiMiniMiiiuiiiiiiiMiiiiiHHnininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiHiiiiiiiHiiiniiiniMiHiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiininiiiMiniiiiHiiiniiiiniiiinMiiniiiiiiiHliiiiiiiiiii^^^^ 

J. BART JOHNSON I 

I i 

j Everything Musical i 

I PIANOS, PLAYER PIANOS, VICTROLAS, | 

I IMPORTER OF VIOLINS, AND A COMPLETE I 

LINE OF MUSICAL MERCHANDISE I 



49 South Side Square 



I Dr. Albyn LincoIvN Adams 

I Ocnllst and Aarist 

I to the State School for the Blind 

323 West State Street 



Practice limited to diseasei of the 
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



DR. ALPHA B. APPLEBEEj 
Dentist | 

I 

326 West State St. | 



H. T. must be interested in the Mexican situation. At 
any rate slie is calling our national president by the Mex- 
ican name of Pedro. 



DR. BYRON S. GAILEY 

EYE, EAR, 
NOSE AND THROAT 



Office and Residence 
340 West State Street 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 
Jno. B. Snell, Prop. 
Rates $2.25, I2.50, and $3.00 per day 
One Block West of Womans College 
Opposite Post Office 
Rooms with or without bath 
Local and Long Distance Telephone 

in every room. 



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Andre & Andre 

E)verything in 

High Grade House Furnishing 

for E^verybody, Everywhere 
46-50 North Side Square 




I CAFE BATZ 

! And Annex for Ladies 



221-223 East State Street 



llUinois Phone 308 



Bell Phone 57 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111. 
Illinois Phone 388 



H. J. — "Is a bay horse white or brown? " 

M. C.^"Do you want a big pin or a large one? " 



I Florence Kirk King 
I Hair Dresser 

I special Service in Shampooing 
I Scalp Treatment, Manufacturing 
I Hair into Latest Styles 
I Work done by appointment 
I 111. Puone 837 503 W. College St. 



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OFFICERS i 

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ILLINOI" WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

College of Liberal Arts 

(Fall classical and scientific courses) I 

College of Music | 

School of Fine Arts [ 

School of Expression [ 

School of Home Economics I 

^A Standard College — one of the best. [ 

Regular college and academy courses I 

leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- I 

inently a Christian college with every | 

facility for thorough work. Located [ 

in the Middle West, in a beautiful, | 

dignified, old college town, noted for | 

its literary and music atmosphere. | 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking for a good college. 

Call or address. Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, 111. 




HIIIIIMWIIII«l> U II M tWIMIIIIIIIMHIIIIItlllWNHtlHIIIIIHMMIIIIIIHIMIIIIIIMIHIIHIMIIHHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIItMMIIM»IMIWMHIimiMmltWIMII 



tlTije CoUege (ireetmgg 

tEfjanfeggibing dumber 
1913 



"Thank God with life as well as lip, 
With holy prayer and fellowship, 

With holier hope and nobler ainf\, 
Sin^ praises to the Father's name." 

( Grace sung at Thanksgiving dinner) 



Kiit CoUege (^reetingg 

Cjf The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 

€]| Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

€]1 Subscriptions, $1. GO a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
€|f Entered at Jacksonville Postofl&ce as second class matter. 



Contents 

Governor Dunne's Proclamation Frontispiece 

Doctor Barker's Proclamation 3 

The Thanksgiving of the Pilgrim 4 

Thanksgiving Poem 5 

Thanksgiving Day at the College .... 6 

His Brother's Keeper 7 

The Hallowe'en Party 10 

Shifting Autumn 11 

Editorial 12 

The King's English 13 

The College Council 14 

The Greetings Box 14 

State Organizations 15 

The College Annual 18 

Y. W. C. A. Carnival 19 

Election Day ... 20 

Reception for Miss Mothershead 22 

Junior-Senior Dinner 22 

The Glee Club 22 

Locals 23 

College Calendar 25 

Society Notes 25 

Department Notes . . 27 

Class Notes 30 

Exchanges 30 



The 
Graphic Arts 

CONCBRN 



The President of the United States having by 
proclamation designated Thursday, Nov. 27, 19 13, as 
a day of national Thanksgiving: 

Now, therefore, I, Edward F. Dunne, Governor 
of the State of Illinois, do hereby urge upon the 
citizens of this state the observance of that day in such 
ceremonies as will express our appreciation of the 
blessings with which the bounty of providence has sur- 
rounded us; for the abundance of our harvests and our 
continued enjoyment of industrial prosperity and for 
the peace and tranquillity of our country and the social 
and educational advantages we possess as citizens of an 
enlightened community. 

For the enjoyment of these manifold blessings it 
is fitting that we should join in the public expression 
of our thankfulness to him to whose beneficence we 
owe their enjoyment and upon whose favor we are 
dependent for their continuance. 

1 , therefore, urge that our citizens cease from their 
ordinary vocations and that they devote the day to 
participation in ceremonies appropriate to teach the 
lesson of thankfulness and gratitude to the giver of 
the abundance and prosperity with which our country 
has been blessed in the last yiar. 



I 



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Zhc CollcQC (3reetinQ6 



Vol. XVII 



Jacksonrille, 111., December, 1 91 3 



No 3 




PRESIDENT MARKER'S THANKSGIVING PROCLA- 
MATION 

Following- a time honored custom, the President of the 
United States and the Governor of Illinois have issued 
proclamations appointing Thursday, the 2 7th day of 
November, a day of State and National Thanksgiving, and 
calling on all citizens to recognize the goodness of 
Almighty God in the blessings which have come to us as a 
people. Such a call from our chief executives meets with 
a cheerful response in every patriotic heart. 

As a college community we have special reason for 
gratitude for the manifold blessings of Divine Providence. 
God has been very good to us. For more than twenty 
years the College has had no accident, no general epi- 
demic, very few cases of serious illness, and no deaths of 
students or teachers during the college year. During the 
last ten years He has blessed us with college advancement 
rarely equalled. The notable additions of property, both 
on the east and the west, the addition of the power house, 
The Maids' Cottage, Music Hall, and Harker Hall, and of 

Page Thre^ 




Wiit CoOese Greetings; 




more than a dozen residence properties across the street 
on every side, are evidences that His good hand is upon 
us for good. The successful campaign for $180,000 for 
equipment and endowment has crowned the past year 
with His goodness. 

For all these mercies, for the largest attendance in 
many years, for a devoted faculty, for an ever increasing 
body of loyal and enthusiastic students, for hosts of friends 
v/ho more and more believe in the Woman's College, for 
a growing loyalty to sound learning and personal right- 
eousness, and increasing devotion to our College motto, 
Knowledge, Faith, Service, we thank God, and acknowl- 
edge Him the Giver of all our good. 

I therefore set apart Thursday, the 2 7th day of No- 
vember, 1913, as a special day of thanksgiving, and re- 
quest that we all at the Illinois Woman's College lay aside 
our ordinary cares and duties and observe the day in such 
manner as will show our gratitude and thankfulness to 
Almighty God. 

JOSEPH R. HARKER, 

November 10, 1913. President. 

THE THANKSGIVING OF THE PILGRIMS 

There was a time when the memory of the Pilgrim who 
came to this country was the center of the Thanksgiving 
Day which he had established. "Thankful for five ker- 
nels of corn," those words thrilled us with admiration and 
wonder. Thankful when they had abundance, thankful 
when they had five grains. In some way the Pilgrim 
Fathers have slipped from our Thanksgiving Days, but 
the spirit in which the day was originated goes on. Per- 
haps we are not as thankful when we have little as when 
we have much. Yet the spirit of the day makes us re- 
member that we have much for which to be grateful; 
makes us wish to pass on to ethers some of the good that 
we have received. 

Page Four 




^tie CoQege ^vntinqi 




"HIS BROTHER'S KEEPER" 

Mrs. Jacob Turkey wheeled about and gave Petie a 
rap that sent him measuring his own circumference sev- 
eral times in succession. 

"I don't know what will ever become of that child. 
He's always doing something to worry me. He will 
surely some day sink his poor mother in sorrow to the 
grave!" 

Now, the young culprit on whom these reflections 
were cast had just been in the act of trying to snatch a 
plump little worm — a rare morsel at this time of the year 
from Etaenezer, the angel child, in whose behalf the 
mother had been searching all morning to find just such 
a choice bite as this. 

"He's the greediest child I ever saw" — here she 
hurled a menacing glance in his direction. Then, looking 
proudly at Ebenezer, as if comparing his fat round body 
to Peter's over-thin frame, she fondly drew him beneath 
her sheltering wing. 

Poor little Petie! He stood wistfully noting these 
caresses. Not once had his mother drawn him to her in 
this manner. He did not stand long in this attitude, how- 
ever, as hunger sent him forth again in quest of food. It 
was nearing bed time and still no sign of anything to 
soothe those pangs — so he dragged his wearly little body 
back to the family roost. 

One day his mother found him feeding with the 
Widow Goose's children near a small creek back of the 
spring-house. In a fit of anger she flew at him. He 
was forever disgracing the family! Didn't he understand 
it was strictly forbidden for her children to recognize the 
widow's family ? Petie did understand — but he had been, 
oh, so hungry! 

Just then Ebenezer came up with a peevish little 
"peep-peep," and soon Petie and his misdemeanors were 
quite forgotten in her efforts to comfort Ebenezer. 

Page Five 



^vSo 



%%t CoUese ^reetinsst 



Day after day, week after week, month after month, 
Ebenezer grew larger and fatter till he was, as his mother 
expressed it, the finest young turkey in Lanesdown. 

Soon a wonderful thing happened! What could it 
all mean ? Peter was so happy, he could scarcely contain 
himself. Every day, and three times a day at that. Far- 
mer Jones came out into the chicken yard and gave them 
corn in abundance. Ebenezer had all he could eat — his 
mother saw to that — still there was enough left for Petie. 

Although Peter now picked up fast, Mrs. Jacob still 
observed with a great deal of satisfaction that Ebenezer 
was by far the finer, fatter, fairer of the two. 

One morning, early, as Petie walked into the chicken 
yard, he heard the farmer praising his brother. Every- 
body praised Ebenezer, but hist — What is that he is say- 
ing? "It will take your biggest blue print platter to hold 
him, Maria. What a splendid Thanksgiving turkey he 
will make!". 

Petie's heart almost stopped beating. Then Eben- 
ezer's was to grace the festal board on the following 
Thursday. "It shall not be," thought he. "Why 
couldn't it have been me? " 

It must be he! He had always been a thorn in the 
flesh to his mother. There was only one thing to be done 
and that quickly — he must find Ebenezer, tell him to stop 
eating, while he himself would eat, both by day and by 
night. He must be on that blue platter Thanksgiving 
morning, not Ebenezer. 

Out by the currant bushes he found him, settled beside 
his mother, toasting his back in what sunlight was to be 
found. After what seemed an eternity to Petie, he had a 
chance to see his brother alone. Of course it is useless 
to say that for once Ebenezer thoroughly approved of his 
brother's plan. His mother must be kept ignorant of it 
as she might thus be shielded from unnecessary worry — 
not that she would worry about Petie — but she might be 
afraid that his plan would fail. 

Page Six 



:l:,y 



®fje College (Greetings! 



Petie stuffed and stuffed till the very sight of a grain 
of corn sickened him. Ebenezer, although his mother 
implored him to eat, stoutly refused, saying that Petie 
needed it much worse than he. Let him have it all. 

"Now did you ever see such a dear, unselfish child as 
my Ebenezer? " she said to Jane Cadacket one day when 
Peter was feasting while Ebenezer stood by watching. 
"He's afraid there isn't enough for both, so he simply 
won't touch a bite." 

Every night before going to bed the two children 
slipped down to the scalehouse and weighed each other. 
On this particular night Ebenezer had just four more 
pounds than Petie to his credit. The following night he 
had but three. This was the night before the fateful one. 
Petie cheered him up still more by telling him that he 
would eat twice as much the following day, but on the 
morrow Petie was ill, quite ill, and try as he might he 
could not choke down a morsel. Ebenezer was in a terri- 
ble state of mind. To satisfy him, his brother managed 
to get to the scalehouse once again. Oh horrors! Petie 
lacked five pounds of equalling his brother's weight. It 
was all up with that fellow now. He hadn't a ghost of 
a chance. The day was one long nightmare to both, but 
all things finally come to an end, so with this day. 

Petie, tired and worn, had just dozed, when he felt as 
though Ebenezer were being quietly lifted from beside 
him, but sleep seemed so dear, the night so peaceful, that 
he sank back into oblivion. 

"Have you seen Ebenezer this morning?" 
Petie woke with a start on hearing his mother's anx- 
ious voice from below him. Turning, he beheld only the 
bare roost where Ebenezer had been only a few hours 
before. 

"1 promised to go with him out to the stacks early 
this morning to spend the day." 

Petie's eyes had been wandering about over the farm 
yard and now were resting on a tall figure in slouch hat 

Page Seven 




Cte CoQese (S^reettngsi 




and duck coat engaged in relieving Ebenezer of his last 
handful of feathers. Quickly he withdrew his gaze lest 
hers should follow, and with a little catch in his voice re- 
plied, "It's not late yet." 

THANKSGIVING DAY 

At Six 

You just bet your life it's comin'. 

Tomorrow's almost here. 
Ever' time I think o' turkey 

My insides jus' feel so queer. 
I began to feel Thanksgiving 

Comin' most a month ago. 
I've been thankful ever' minute, 

Tho some times the days went slow. 
I kin smell those pies a-bakin' 

Thru ev'ry open door. 
An' if I don't eat much to-day 

Thanksgiving I'll hold lots more. 
So I pull my belt up tighter. 

An' I think o' all the mess 
O' turkey 'at I'll eat to-morrow 

An' I'm full o' thankfulness. 

At Twenty 

Oh yes! We'll knock 'em off the earth — 

They haven't got a show. 
We don't intend to fool one bit — 

Just fix 'em up a bit and — go. 
We've trained thru all this whole first term — 

We're banking lots on this one game. 
If we don't win the blooming' thing, 

Thanksgiving will be pretty tame. 
I can see the colors flying 

Every time I shut my eyes. 

Page Eight 



tKf)c Cottege Greetings! 



And I hear the old band playing 

Tunes of former victories. 
If we hold our own against them, 

If we only stand the test, 
I'll just bet the pilgrim fathers 

Couldn't beat our thankfulness. 
At Sixty 
Oh the m.emories that crowd each year 

Around Thanksgiving Day, 
That make me feel the rapid pace 

Of time that has now passed away. 
How many of such days I've spent 

Thru all the months and years gone by. 
And thoughts of past Thanksgiving Days, 

As this time of year draws nigh. 
I've had my days of pumpkin pie, 

I've had my foot-ball strife— 
But another thought comes to me 

Thru the years of later life. 
If I cherish all my memories, 

If there's none I'd take away, 
And as time goes on they're dearer. 

Then — I've kept Thanksgiving Day. 

Marjorie Becker, '18. 

THANKSGIVING DAY AT THE COLLEGE 

From early morning, when in kimonos and breakfast 
caps we appear in the halls for corridor breakfast, until 
the night when, after the big dinner, the toasts and the 
surprises, we go wearily to bed, Thanksgiving is one of the 
most enjoyable of our college days. For the Freshman 
it is a chance to show their artistic and executive ability, 
for to them falls the lot of transforming the dining room 
into a banquet hall; for every one it is a happy day into 
which so many things are crowded that you forget that 
you had expected to spend a homesick day. 

Pfge Nina 



(^f)£ College (greetings! 



S^ 



Seraphina- 
dinner? 



-Are they going to make toast at that 



In Evolution Class. — Miss V. — Is the struggle for ex- 
istence greater where there is an abundance or where there 
is a scarcity of food ? 

J. R. — Where there is an abundance. 

L. G. — I disagree. 

JO R. — Well, when you have eaten a Christmas or 
Thanksgiving dinner isn't there a greater struggle than if 
you hadn't had so much? 




ON HALLOWEEN 

It was a grand merry-making that the College Specials i 
gave at I. W. C. this October thirty-second. A truly rep- 
resentative body of lively jollificationers marched, saun- 
tered, jigged, waddled, skipped, hobbled and toddled 
across the stage and then settled down to see "The Lady 
in Red." The pretty play was quite absorbing and kept • 
even the smallest children and the most irrepressible dark- I 
ies subdued for an hour or more, then down through festive ' 
yet awe-inspiring halls that crowd was led to the myster- i 
ious chamber of horrors. There, helpless because of the I 
darkness, one was seized and forced to ride upon ocean 
waves, then a ghastly, glowing skeleton glided into the 
pathway, while, if anyone hesitated to go on, little imps 
grabbed the ankles and pricked and prodded from all 
sides. Suddenly, squeezing walls held one fast, and no 
sooner was escape made from these than a mighty sick- 
ening-sweet spray descended from some unknown direc- 
tion. The victim was released for a v/hile and allowed to 
enjoy such pleasures as having his fortune told and visit- 
Page Ten 



iJ 



■um i m!iM MywilU il ]Ml > JJl l M ii |.u il l. """™"" fflB fil 



Wtt CoHege ^reetingsf 




ing the abode of the spirits of the dead, but soon loud 
wailing voices called and passage to the outer world was 
made thru the strange and awful Cave of the Winds. 
Outside, the completely terrified sufferer was revived in 
a pleasant room by pleasant people, who gave to him 
Hallow'een refreshments. 

SHIFTING AUTUMN 

Happy is the early autumn, 
When the summer has forgotten 
All her fierceness and her passion, 
But still lingers not yet ready 
To give o'er to frost her splendors. 
Joyous fall-time! 

There are golden da3'^s in autumn. 
When the rays of sunlight slanting 
Softly cling to yellow field flowers. 
Purple asters, and red salvia; 
And the leaves are all a-giowing. 
Royal autumn! 

There come lazy days in autmn 
Made for dreaming and for feeling 
Just a little tinge of sadness; 
Overhead the flight of v/ild-birds. 
All around the shifting shadows. 
Summer's left us. 

After this the busy days come; 
All a cheerful, bustling hurry, 
Filled with shouts of pushing children 
Answering the school-bell's clanging, 
Filled with rapid thud in coal-bins. 
Winter's coming! 

Last of all there come the grey days, 
Bringing trees all bare and lonesome; 
Underneath the brov/n leaves rustling. 
Long and steady, dismal raining — 
Film of ice across the water. 
Almost snow-time. 

Letta Irwin, '14. 

Page Eleven 




Wiit CoUcge Greetings 



Faculty Committee— Miss Mothershead, Miss Baker, Miss 

Johnston. 
Editor — Abbie Peavoy 

Associate Editors— Erma Elliott, Helena Munson, Helen McGhee 
Business Managers — Geneva Upp, Winifred Burmeiater, Alma 

Harmel 



Most of US are just waking up to the fact that we are 
making history in this College. Every day that passes 
has something to add to our record as an educational insti- 
tution that counts, not merely exists. It is not expected 
that we take especial notice of these days which are 
thought of as matters of course in a steady movement for- 
ward. Special events, however, that give rise to epochs, 
are certainly worthy of the special attention given them. 
The spirit of progress, which is our greatest asset as a col- 
lege, has shown us that we, as college women, are not 
giving our fullest and best development, to the College. 

Student government, a direct result of progress, is 
capable of supplying and furthering this development. 
Its merit, as a unifying agency, is due to the fact that it 
is up to the individual to work for the mass. 

That we are ready for student government is shown 
by our increased ability in open discussion. The mass 
meetings and class meetings that were held to bring the 
subject of student government before the student body 
were the most profitable and satisfactory ones held this 
year. People said things. All of this goes to prove that 
we are thinking. Remember, you are a member of the 
student body. Whether Senior, Freshman, Special or 
First Prep, it doesn't matter, if you are going to put your 
"uphill shoulder to the wheel" and push this thing with all 
the strength of loyalty and honesty of conviction that you 
possess. In the ballot cast for student government there 
were three votes against it. Are we going to add to those 
three lonesome votes by a failure to respond individually, 
or are we going to surprise even ourselves by the ease 
with which we can put this movement through? 

Page Twelve 



•Jl 



ttf}t CoQege Greetings; 




Two very interesting evenings were spent in discus- 
sion of grammar and courtesy, by the student body this 
month. At the first meeting the grammar committee 
which was elected several weeks ago made its report. A 
sentiment of respect for the King's English has as a result 
of this meeting been aroused in the College. The pur- 
pose of the committee report is not to make our conversa- 
tions self-conscious, but to make us more careful in ob- 
serving the mistakes which we thoughtlessly make in our 
daily use of grammar. The question of culture was to 
be discussed in connection with the grammar, but as the 
time was up the discussion had to be left to some future 
time. The second report came from the committee on 
Courtesy and Consideration. This group of girls had, 
also, been spying on themselves and their neighbors. 
They suggested many things which if followed will make 
our relations to the faculty, to each other, to the help in 
the house, more thoughtful and congenial. 

THE KING'S ENGLISH— A GRAMMATICAL MONO- 
LOGUE 

Say, kids, listen ! What do you know about it? The 
Seniors and Juniors and Sophomores — some of them, I 
mean — have went on a camping party! Seems like us 
Freshmen don't get no privileges a' tall. I don't think it's 
right. And say, I've got to make a talk in English to- 
morrow. I will die. I know 1 will. Miss N. don't have 
no mercy on a person. And talk about your luck! They 
had a swell play at the opera house last night and hardly 
nobody went. I wisht I'd a knowed we could o' went. 

Page Thirteen 




Cfje College ^ttetinqi 



I'd a been and asked to gone. Oh, thanks! I love 
apples. Let's see, I guess I like these kind the best. 
Honest, I've got to begin working pretty soon. I took 
me a little holiday yesterday. Oh, say, Mary, show us 
your new dress. How perfectly darling! Look out! 
You'll squash it. You know, 1 don't hardly know what 
I'll wear Thanksgiving. Mother told my sister and I we 
could have some new clothes after Christmas. Say! Can 
you make your shoes last very long? I use to could, but 
I can't now. Ye gods and little fishes! Has the bell 
rang? Well, wouldn't that get you? Well, goodby, 
honey. See you down to dinner. 

THE COLLEGE COUNCIL 

It has been the duty of the College Council to appoint 
several committees during the last weeks. An entertair.- 
ment committee has been appointed to determine what 
outside entertainments should be given by the student 
body. A committee on evaluation, to work out a system 
of determining how much outside work is to be allowed 
to a student in addition to her college course, is now at 
work. Two committees, the Backward Committee, 
which is to gather together the time-honored customs of 
the school, and the Looking Forward Committee, which 
is to suggest new rules, have been appointed to work out 
a system of rules for the organization of student govern- 
ment. 

THE GREETINGS BOX 

That box! That fateful Greetings box! 

Long weeks have o'er thee flown. 
Yet still no gifts have cheered thy depths 

Or soothed our plaintive moan. 

Our editor — the best of girls, 
A paragon complete, 

Page Fourteen 



Q^e Colltge #reettngK 




Concluded thus to tempt the school 
To literary feat. 

They made you square and strong and neat, 
And smoothed you down with wax; 

They nailed you up and made you fast 
With rows of lovely tacks. 

And there you stand, you Greetings box, 

Our vainest, fondest dream. 
But charm no poets, lure no wits, 

Things are not what they seem! 

If only you could ever know 

How Abbie's peaked and pined, 
What mockery your sleek brown front 

Seems to her eager mind; 

You'd lose your smug, contented air. 
Your nails would prick your heart, 

Your varnish run quite off in shame. 
Your hinges rust apart, 

B. — (Unknown) 

STATE ORGANIZATIONS 

Boarding Students 

Illinois 131 

Indiana 30 

Missouri 14 

Iowa 9 

Kansas 5 

Minnesota 4 

Colorado 3 

Arkansas 2 

Nebraska 2 

South Dakota 2 

Wisconsin 2 

California 1 

Michigan 1 

Page Fifteen 



Wiiz College (§reettng£( 




Montana 1 

Oklahoma 1 

Texas 1 

Washington 1 



210 



Students Not Boarding in Building 

Arkansas 1 

Kansas 1 

Illinois 17 

Jacksonville 99 



118 



The Iowa Club 

All the Iowa girls met in the private parlor one even- 
ing in October and formed their Iowa club. Margaret 
Moss was elected president and Irma Miller secretary- 
treasurer. 

Friday evening, October the twenty-fourth, the club 
met at an Iowa table, decorated in gold and black. Be- 
tween courses was sung the Iowa song: 

You ask what land I love the best 

Iowa, 'tis Iowa, 
The fairest state in all the West 

Iowa, 'tis Iowa, 
From yonder Mississippi's stream 
To where Missouri's waters gleam 
O fair it is as poet's dream 
Iowa, oh, Iowa. 
The Iowa club regrets the loss of one of its numbers, 
Miss Mildred Squire of Davenport, who went home on 
account of illness, 

Irma Miller and Wylma Cox entertained the Iowa 
club at a Kensington on November the seventeenth. 

Page Sixteen 




Wi}t CoQege 4lreettns£( 




The Minnesota Club 

The Minnesota girls regret that on account of the de- 
crease in their numbers they will not be able to continue 
their existence as the "Minnesota Nine." There are, 
nevertheless, many things that a quartette can attempt. 
Perhaps in that far distant track meet we may be the 
archery or tennis victors. 

The Missouri Club 

On the night of November thirteenth, 1913, thirteen 
Missouri girls met the old chapel and organized a Missouri 
State club. Two officers were elected, Helen Harrison, 
president, Helen Jones, secretary and treasurer. 

The club wishes to announce that they challenge all 
other state clubs to an interstate track meet to be held in 
the spring. 

if 

Indfana Club Notes 

President — Maude Alice Drake. 
Vice-President — Grace Heller. 
Secretary — Florence Haller. 
Treasurer — Ruth Alexander. 
Reporter — Mary Harrison. 

The club from the Hoosier state has the largest mem- 
bership of the state organizations at I. W. C, there being 
thirty-three of us. The members are bubbling over with 
enthusiasm and are doing all in their power to make the 
year of 1913-14 the best the club has ever experienced. 

On Monday morning, November the tenth, we en- 
joyed a waffle breakfast at "The Peacock," which re- 
lieved the monotony of shredded wheat biscuits. 

The president delightfully entertained us Saturday 
evening, November the sixteenth, in the Phi Nu hall. We 
discussed plans for a camping party which will take place 
this coming summer. The main feature of the entertain- 

Page Seventeen 



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tSfat CoOege ^reetingtf 




ment was the cutting of a large pink cake with Indiana 
written on it. 

CHALLENGE 

The Indiana Club 

Challenges 

The World 

to 
Basket Ball 
The state accepting will hand in the acceptance to the 
president of the club. 

^^ 

THE COLLEGE ANNUAL 

At chapel time on October thirtieth a mass meeting of 
the students was held at which it was announced that the 
Junior class will undertake the responsibility of publishing 
a "College Annual" this year. 

Miss Peril Hess, the president of the Council, called 
the meeting to order, and in a few words told how for a 
long while it has been the dream of the future to have a 
college year book, but for many reasons it has never been 
possible of attainment until now. This year the college 
council decided that we must have a year book this year, 
and granted to the Junior class the privilege of publishing 
it. The staff, as elected by the Juniors, she read as 
follows: 

Editor-in-chief — Audrey Berryman. 

Assistant editor-in-chief — Mary Louise Powell. 

Associate editors — Effie Theobald, Helen Dinsmore. 

Art editor — Peril Hess. 

Business manager — Josephine Ross. 

Assistant business manager — Winifred Burmeister. 

The meeting was then turned over to Miss Audrey 
Berryman, who made a most interesting talk on the plans 
and hopes of the annual board. Miss Josephine Ross, as 
business manager, and Miss Hess, as art editor, were called 
upon to tell what part the students of the College and 
Academy were to have in the Annual 
Pa^e Eighteen 




t!^e College Greetings; 




Miss Berryman then asked if there were not some of 
the school who would like to pledge their support. En- 
thusiastic talks were made by Ruth Alexander, Freda Fen- 
ton, Ruth Want, Lucile McCloud, Esther Fowler, Abbie 
Peavoy, Hallie Clem, Miss Mothershead, Miss Johnston 
and Mr. Max Swarthout. 

The name contest which Miss Berryman announced, 
to begin that day and close the following Thursday at 
9 p. m., was, we regret to say, unsuccessful. The staff 
was much pleased with the interest shown by the many 
who gave their suggestions — and there really were some 
very good names suggested — but the staff decided that 
they would not choose any name until later, hoping in the 
meantime that some one will be inspired to give us some- 
thing original that will meet with the approval of the en- 
tire staff. Choosing our name is one of the most impor- 
tant questions we have, since the name will not only be 
used this but in all the years to come. 

Committees are being appointed from the student 
body to act as reporters to the Annual staff. The Juniors 
want the whole school to be interested, actively interested, 
in this first appearance of the College Annual. The Jun- 
iors feel exceedingly gratified at the interest so far shown, 
and hope it will be continued. 

THE Y. W. STREET CARNIVAL 

One Saturday night there passed up and down the cor- 
ridors of the dormitories a most startlingly unusual band, 
emitting shrieks, squeals and blasts to the accompaniment 
of various popular songs. Of course everyone followed 
the band. The occasion was the Y. W. street carnival, 
and the main show, a minstrel. It was a perfect "scream" 
from the stereopticon burlesque on the Freshmen to the 
final local hit by the leading lady. Then the band howled 
the way down to the smaller shows, via the shoot-the- 
chutes. Bouncing Betty rode her steed bareback in an 

Pag« NinetMB 




tE^e College ^vtttin^si 



astonishing manner, the nigger babies refused to be hit, 
and the spectacular high diver performed her stunt brave- 
ly. What matter if the merry-go-round did upset with 
four faculty members? What if the President and his 
wife were arrested, imprisoned, brought to trial and fined 
for spooning? "Hot dog" and lemonade soothed all, 
and the art gallery furnished entertainment for the most 
trained taste ! 

I. W. C. SUFFRAGISTS 

On the great day when the women of Jacksonville 
first experienced their use of the ballot concerning the 
local option question, I was fortunate enough to be ranked 
with the faculty in the class of those who were to decide 
this momentous issue. Added to my delight in being able 
to vote was the privilege of breakfasting with the faculty 
voters. Many envious and admiring glances were cast 
towards us, in whose hands were held the reins of power. 
Those glances, however, did not check the rapidity with 
which we consumed our breakfast. Amid loud applause 
we rushed upstairs. After a scramble for lost hat-pins 
and forgotten purses, undaunted we set out to our voting 
precinct. Only a few who were sufficiently inspired had 
preceded us there. 

"Humph! I didn't know college girls were allowed to 
vote" came from a veteran at the registration table. 

"Sh — h, they are college teachers" followed in an un- 
dertone. 

Again my joy nearly overleaped its bounds — to be 
taken for a member of the faculty. 

Given our ballots, we separately went into the myster- 
ious voting booth, a commonplace cubby hole. The lit- 
tle check, which seemed a trivial thing, could cause un- 
dreamed of anxiety. I re-read the ballot three times to be 
sure the check was placed correctly. As I came out of 
the booth 1 heard the clerk say — 
Page Twenty 



tlDIje CoOese ^vtetinQSi 



"Your vote is challenged." 

"But she is twenty-one, furthermore she's a school 
teacher," spoke up the mother of a slender scared-faced 
girl. 

"Let :he notary public swear her in, he is at breakfast 
now." 

By this time all our party had voted, and though desir- 
ous of seeing the outcome of this affair, we heeded the call 
of eight o'clock classes. At the hedge we were greeted 
by a group of eager photographers, who wished to have a 
picture of the first I. W. C. voters. 

G. V. U. 

Fnm the first time that I remember hearing the words 
womai and suffrage mentioned in the same breath, I have 
had ai intense desire to vote. So when the word came 
to me while I was out of the state that this honor and priv- 
ilege had been conferred upon us, I was very glad. At 
first ' was worried for fear the first chance to exercise this 
womerful right would come this year before I had reached 
that age which forever separates us from childhood, or 
that age which I thought would perform this remarkable 
fea^ Again fate favored me, for the magic date was set 
for a few days after my birthday. Days beforehand I 
bei^an to plan for election day, to ask where to go, to 
nuke arrangements for getting there, and to resolve to 
git up early for once anyway. I was up before six 
o'clock, at a quarter of seven I was impatiently awaiting 
Ihe buggy, and before seven 1 was on my way to the polls. 
V\y excitement increased with every foot of the way, and 
as we aproached the little shack I could hardly wait to get 
in that wonderful booth and cast my vote. My turn came 
quickly and before 1 could realize that I was actually vot- 
ing, it was over. No, it was not over either; all day long 
I waited for the returns, never before had I been so inter- 
ested. When finally the last figures were chalked on the 

Page Twenty-one 



Z'tit College #reetmg< 



bulletin, I had a feeling of exultation that I had helped in 
ever so small a way to win the victory of the day. 

E. L. E. 

RECEPTION ' 

Mrs. Marker, Mrs. Metcalf and Miss Neville, assisted 
by the faculty, entertained at a most delightful reception 
Monday afternoon, November the tenth, in honor of Miss 
Amy Mothershead. 

The College halls and the reception room weie beau- 
tifully decorated with cut flowers and ferns. 

The guests were met at the door by college girls and 
ushered to the reception room. Later they were ecorted 
to the Society halls, where dainty refreshments were 
served by another group of girls. 

After the guests had departed Mrs. Marker entertained 
the faculty and others who had assisted during the after- 
noon at a delicious three-course dinner. 



JUNIOR-SENIOR DINNER 

The Seniors and Juniors are frequently the caus( of 
envy, but especially so Thursday evening, November the 
thirteenth, when a merry party consisting of the Seniors 
and Juniors with their class officers. Dr. and Mrs. Mark»r, 
Miss Mothershead and Miss Neville boarded the six-fiftetn 
car for the Colonial Inn. After the sumptuous dinner 
given by the Juniors, impromptu toasts and music wen 
enjoyed. 

THE GLEE CLUB 

Hurrah for the College Glee club. The voices of the 
applicants were tried out last week. The membership 
now stands as follows: 
Page Twenty-two 



(Ktt CoQese Greetings; 



Nina Slaten , Louise Hughes, Bonnie Derry, Freda 
Fenton, Edith Heit, Esse Summers, Mabel Stoltz, Edna 
Robb, Roma Swarthout, Fern Hartsuck, Mary Violett, 
Annis Wells, Hallie Clem, Helen Jones, Noami Davis, 
Irene Crum, 

We are very proud of this new organization. We 
hope that they will soon make their official appearance. 

LOCALS 

What would happen if — 

Every girl started to the dining room when the second 
breakfast bell rang ? 

There was no lingering in the halls before evening 
chapel? 

Nobody spoke of Christmas and home? 

The reporters were punctual in handing in their re- 
ports for the Greetings? 

We should follow the suggestions made by the Gram- 
mar and Courtesy committees? 

We should, really, have a week of quiet? 



There is a matter which the old students have failed 
to pass down to the new girls or to observe themselves. 
It is in regard to the Sunday night lunches. The time was 
given in order that we might have more time to ourselves. 
It was stipulated, when the privilege was given, that not 
more than six girls should be in the same room, and that 
no extensive cooking should be done. We should not 
make this lunch an additional extravagance. With a lit- 
tle planning the lunch can be made inexpensive. The 
Greetings is glad to publish from time to time recipes for 
dishes which will not cost more than the amount that is 
usually spent for "eats" for the room. 



Riddle — What is there about psychology that makes 
even babies cry ? 

Page Twenty-time 



Wbt College 4^reetings( 



Quite a number of our girls have been made happy by 
visits from relatives this month. Mrs. Meek, Irene Crum's 
father, mother and little sister, Mrs. Newlin, Mr. and Mrs. 
Barton, Mr. Randall, June Wiley's aunt, Lucile Rexroat's 
sister, Ruth Brown's sister, Gretchen Francken's father, 
Dorothy Pinkston's sister. Pearl Sweet's grandmother, 
sister and brother. Bertha Smith's mother, and Mrs. Row- 
land have spent a few days at our I. W. C. 



Elizabeth Williams knows that there are 523 spindles 
in the railing from first floor Marker to fifth. 



If you have just ninety-five cents to buy ninety-five 
cents worth of apples, weenies and buns, why, get M. S. 
to do the buying, for she knows how to manage so that a 
whole dime is left over for candy, altho even she may not 
know how she does it. 



All contributions to the Greetings Box are very wel- 
come, from poems to the quarter left by the bishops. 

Men say that women cannot hold their places in a line. 
They say that in such places as banks or bread lines wo- 
men not only expect the men to step aside but also each 
one expects a place to be made for her at the very front. 

It has always been a matter of pride that the Illinois 
Woman's College girls observed the maxim "First come, 
first served" without pushing and crowding, whether the 
line is for a picnic supper or before the Dean's door. 
There is one little courtesy, however, that we as students 
are happy to show to the faculty, to visitors, and to older 
people: We are glad to step back and give them a place 
at the head of the line. 

Old Student. 



The editor and an associate editor of the Rambler 
paid a visit to the Greetings last week. They came to 

Fage Twenty-four 




turtle CoSege ^rtttin^i 




inspect our office. They agreed with us in thinking that 
we are very well equipped. We hope that the Rambler 
will be able to get a permanent office. We can testify 
that it is both a time and labor saver. 

THE COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Hallowe'en. 

Election day. 

Van Vliet and Marie Edwards in recital. 

Council meeting. 

Picnic supper. 

Y. W. C. A. carnival. 

Indiana Club waffle breakfast. 

Acadamea pledges new members. 

Junior-Senior dinner. 

Council meeting. 

Self government adopted in mass meeting. 

Phi Nu banquet. 

Senior play. 

Thanksgiving Day. 

SOCIETY NOTES 

Phi Nu 

At the regular meeting of Phi Nu on November the 
fourth, seventeen girls took the pledge which made them 
members of the society. 

The date for the annual banquet has been set on the 
evening of November the twenty-second. 

Belles Lettres 

The Belles Lettres society announces the following 
new members: Genevieve Dague, Golda Fuger, Esther 
Fowler, Irene Irwin, Eloise Jacobs, Wilma Miller, Johanna 
Onken, Effie Theabold, Alma Weber, Bertha Weber, and 
Dorothy Stevens, 

Fftge Twenty-flT« 



Nov. 


1 


Nov. 


4 


Nov. 


6 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


8 


Nov. 


10 


Nov. 


13 


Nov. 


14 


Nov. 


15 


Nov. 


22 


Nov. 


24 


Nov. 


27 



ryj 

is 



Wfjt CoHtge 6reettng< 




The work taken up this semester deals with American 
literature in relation to types of American peoples. We 
have already had some very interesting programs on the 
Indian, the Negro, and the Westerner. We have yet to 
take up the Frontiersman, the Settler, the Southerner, and 
the Immigrant. 

Sieverdena Harmel, who has been ill at the Passavant 
hospital, is much better now and will be taken to her home 
in Pekin, Illinois, November fifteenth. Miss Harmel does 
not expect to return to school until after Christmas. 

We have word of the marriage of Adelaide Wright, 
one of our old members, to Mr. Charles L. Brainard. 
They will be at home after November twentieth in Water- 
loo, Iowa. 

Theta Sigma 

A series of programs on "Statues in Literature" prom- 
ises very interesting meetings for the next few weeks. 

Because of illness, Ruth Miller has had to give up her 
work for a while. We are looking forward to having her 
with us again after Christmas. 

Alice Herren was called home Thursday, November 
the thirteenth, because of the death of her grandfather. 

yf 
Lambda Mu 

Eighteen new members have been welcomed into the 
fellowship of Lambda Mu. 

The use of Belles Lettres hall has helped, temporarily, 
in solving the problem of making the time, the place and 
the girls coincide. 

Lambda Alpha Mu was pleased to have Miss Mamie 
Pinkston visit a meeting. 

From the impromptu program given by the new mem- 
bers at the last meeting Lambda Mu feels assured that its 
prospects for the coming year are glowing. At the same 
meeting permanent committees for the year were ap- 
pointed by the president. 

Page Twenty-ftix 



(E^e CoSege Greetings; 




Academea Notes 

Nelle Rives and Mary Fowler have been elected to 
fill the vacancies made by Nora Alexander as vice-presi- 
dent and Ednah Thompson as treasurer. The two other 
vacant offices will be filled later by new members. 

November the thirteenth the old Academea girls, in- 
cluding Esther Fowler, Johanna Onken and Rachel Mor- 
ris, spent a pleasant afternoon with Myrtle Mitchell. 

DEPARTMENT NOTES 
Home Economics 

Miss Churton gave a talk on "Ventilation" to the 
members of the Tuesday club at its regular meeting on 
November the fourth. 

During the last few weeks two members of the first 
year class have had to leave school. First Rachel Gid- 
dings because of illness at home, and Alice Blick on ac- 
count of her own failing health. 

CHAFING DISH RECIPES 




% 



Hot Chocolate 

2 tablespoons cocoa 

2 tablespoons sugar 
\ cup boiling water 

3 cups milk 
Few grains salt 



Scald the milk. Mix cocoa, sugar and salt, dilute with 
boiling water and cook until a smooth paste — boil three 
minutes; turn into scalded milk. Serve at once with 
whipped cream. 

Creamed Oysters 

1 pint oysters \ teaspoon celery salt 

\\ cups white sauce 

Page Twenty-seyen 



W)t CoUege ^rtttin^i 




Clean and cook oysters until plump and edges begin 
to curl ; drain and add to white sauce seasoned with celery 
salt. Serve on toast. 

White Sauce 

2 tablespoons butter 1 cup milk 

3 tablespoons flour I teaspoon salt 

Put butter in saucepan, stir until melted; add flour 
and seasonings; stir until thoroughly blended; pour on 
gradually the milk, stirring until well blended, then beat- 
ing until smooth. 



{['4 A Ut <d ^ 



The choral organization, heretofore known as the 
Glee club, has changed its name to the Madrigal club, 
and will be under the direction of Miss McKay of the Col- 
lege of Music faculty. A fine program of chorus music 
is being prepared for a recital to be given later in the col- 
lege year. 

Miss Nicholson visited her sister at Hedding College 
for a few days this month. 

Misses Beebe, Goodrick and Mrs. Kolp were in Chi- 
cago last week. 

The recital by Cornelius Van Vliet, head cellist of 
Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra, and Miss Edwards, 
pianist of Chicago, was greatly appreciated by the audi- 
ence. The program was of unusually high grade through- 
out, both performers proving themselves artists of excep- 
tional character. 

A number of the College girls have joined the Grace 
church chorus choir, which will sing at the regular even- 
ing church service. A Christmas cantata, by Chadwick, 
will be given. 

Page Twenty-eight 




Wi^t College 4lreeting£( 



A large double case, made especially for the library 
of ensemble music, has recently been placed in Director 
Swarthout's studio. 

Definite word has just been received to the effect that 
the recital scheduled for November seventeenth by Mrs. 
Grace Wood Jess, soprano, and Miss Carol Robinson, 
pianist, cannot be given on the date announced. It is 
probable that the concert as planned will take place later 
in the year. Full announcement will be made as soon as 
possible. 

The regular Thursday afternoon recitals given by 
students from College of Music are well attended, and the 
programs show exceptionally thorough training and un- 
usual talent. 

Expression Notes 

Miss Vera Tomlin, one of last year's graduates in 
Epression, gave her commencement program at Spring- 
field recently. She presented "When Knighthood Was 
in Flower," which met with great success. 

Arrangements have been made for the use of the 
practice rooms on fifth floor Music hall for the Expression 
students. It is an achievement long anticipated and is 
appreciated by all. 

The advanced students' recital will be given Decem- 
ber eighteenth. "Child World" is to be the theme run- 
ning through the various readings. 

On the evening of December eighth Miss Allen will 
give a program of Browning monologues. 

Miss Parsons will read in Marshalltown and Belle 
Plain, Iowa, November twenty-seventh and twenty-eighth. 



Page Twenty-nine 



tE^e CoUege ^retttngtf 




CLASS NOTES 

Seniors 

The Seniors are busy practicing for the play which 
they are to give the twenty-fourth of November. The 
proceeds from the play are to go toward paying the en- 
dowment pledge made by the class. 

^& 
Sophomore Notes 

Shortly after the last dinner bell, when all others were 
taking their places, they were greatly surprised Wednes- 
day evening, October twenty-second, to see the Sopho- 
mores, in white dresses and yellow ties, making their way 
from the reception hall to the dining room. As guests 
of the class. Miss Mothershead and Dr. and Mrs. Marker 
led the way with Miss Cowgill, the Sophomore class offi- 
cer. Softly the rays shone through yellow shades from 
the lights just above three tables purposely arranged on 
the farther side of the room, while a number of large 
chrysanthemums served as centerpieces. Enjoying the 
novelty and effect of it all, and looking at the tables, each 
found her place card, on which was a dainty hand-painted 
chrysanthemum. Altogether, the Sophomore colors, 
yellow and white, were carried out delightfully, even to 
the charming little yellow baskets containing salted 
almonds. After the dinner party all went to the chapel, 
when later each of the guests was presented with three of 
the yellow chrysanthemums. 

Because of the change in classification, we have wel- 
comed three new members from the College Specials, 
Naomi Davis, Louise Gilfillan and Hazel Kiblinger, mak- 
ing a total number of thirty-two for the Sophomore class. 

EXCHANGES 

We notice that the Christian University at Canton, 
Mo., is also starting an annual this year. We hope the 

Page Thirty 



^f)t CoQese ^vtttinQi 




"Optimist" is as optimistic concerning the outcome of 
their annual as the "Greetings" is concerning the outcome 
of the first annual of I. W. C. 

Two of our exchanges differ in a marked degree from 
the rest of the college papers — the "Upsala Gazette," 
partly written in the Swedish language, and the "Central 
Wesleyan Star," partly written in German. 

One of the best features of the "Lincolnian" is the 
cuts at the heads of the departments. 

We congratulate the "Blackburnian" upon the neat- 
ness of its appearance and its new departments, the mo- 
tive of which is to bring the students in closer touch with 
the college of the past. 

A similar feature is noticed in the "Illinois Wesleyan 
Argus," which plans to devote part of the Alumni Section 
each month to some article written by or concerning some 
of their alumni. 

The "Rambler" is to be congratulated for its forceful 
editorials and the quality of some of its literary produc- 
tions, especially the story entitled "The Curse of 
Memory." 

Other exchanges that have been received are the 
"Vidette," Culver, 111.; the "Eureka College Pegasus," 
the "Rockford Ralla," the "Carthage Collegian," "St. 
Mary's Chimes, and the "Augustana Observer." 



Page Thirty-one 



^•iiiiniiiitiiiniiiiimmiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiMiMiiHiiiiHiMiimmiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiHiiiituiit 

I THE TWENTY DEPARTMENTS in our store are 

I just like twenty little stores, every one devoted to 

I the sale and display of articles FOR THE MoDRRN 

I Woman's wear. 

I Each Department makes a determined and successful 

I effort to show first the attractive new STYLES 

I OE THE SEASON. You'll find shopping- pleasant 

I here. 



Kid Gloves 
Neckwear 
Fabric Gloves 
lyinen 

White Goods 
Notions 
L,aces and 

Embroideries 



Corsets 

Art Goods 

Petticoats 

Handkerchiefs 

Ribbons 

Toilet Goods 

Jewelry and 



Knit Underwear 
Hosiery 

Children's Wear 
Muslin Underwear 
and Waists 
Coats and Suits 
Dresses 



Leather 



LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 

FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

Footwear for all occasions — 
Street Shoes 

Dress Slippers 

Bed-room Slippers 

We Repair Shoes | 




i J. A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYEl 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

Pennants, Stationery, Tennis Goods, Drug's, School 
Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory- 
Books and Photo Albums 

"PLEASED customers" — OUR MOTTO 

Goods Delivered 



Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 



Corner South Main St. and Sqoaj 



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liiiimiiiiiiiiiiHiMiiHHiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinimiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiimimiiiinininninuniiMiHimiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiMiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiMinMini^ 

Coats, Suits and Skirts tailored to your individual | 

measure and form at | 

POPULAR PRICES j 

All work made in our own shop by expert workmen. We | 

guarantee to fit you. | 

JACKSONVILLE TAILORING COMPANY I 



233 East State Street 



Opposite Pacific Hotel 



Seraphina — Who wrote that poem "The dashing" 
waves broke high"? 



HARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers, 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greenhouses, Bell 775 



McGINNIS' I 

The Young Ladies' Shoe Store | 

See the "BABY DOhh SHOE.'I 
It's the Latest. | 

We carry a full line of Bvening Slippers| 
in all colors. | 

If it's new, we have it | 

JAS. McGINNIS & CO.! 

Batt Side Square | 

nuNiiiiiiiiniuiiiiiiiiitiHiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



uiiimmiimmiiniiiiinirmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiHiMiiiiiniMiniiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiuiiiin 

s I 

i The most dainty things in Rings and Jewelry. 

I New and handsome styles of goods in Sterling Silver I 

I Highest grades of Cut Glass, and every | 

I description of Spectacles and Kye Glasses 

I Fine Diamonds a Specialty 

I at 

I RUSSE)LL&LYON'S 

I The Oldest Established Jewelry House in Central Illinois 

I West Side Square 

I Both Phones 96 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say 

We can furnish your 

Shoes and Party Slippers 

in the popular styles, 

leathers, and 

fabrics 



All the Faculty, Students and Friends; 
of the College should have a Checking: 
or Savings Account with 

P. G. FARRELL & COJ 

BANKERS 

F. E. Farrell, President 

E. E. Crabtree, Vice-President 

H. H. Potter, Cashier 

M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier 



M. A. D. — I'll bet that you won't know me at the 
masquerade tonight, but I will have to keep still and not 
talk, for they will all know my voice. 

L. G. — Have you ever tried that, Maude Alice? 



Concent 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAI. OCCASIONS 



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jiiMiiimitiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiHiiiniiHiiiniiiininiiiiiiMiiiiniiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiinmiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimmiiiiiiiimiiiiiMiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinHiiiiiiiiiin^ 

For those who discriminate | 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to i 

please the students who come to our city. We select only the | 

best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. | 

Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and | 

Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. | 

Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all | 

College functions. | 

Vickery Si Merrigan 

227 West State Street | 



iBoth Phones 309 



SAFEST PlyACE TO TRADE 

^ILLERBY'S 

DRY GOODS STORE 



West Side Square 



Brady Bros. | 

E^verything- in Hardware and! 
Paints I 



In zoology class, after the explanation of cell division 
had been given. R. P. — "What is the difference be- 
tween split and separate? " 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . $200,000 
Surplus . . 34,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 

U. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 

Julius B. Strawn, President 
Chas. B. Graff, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T.^B. Orear 
H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 
J. R. Robertson 
iHuiiiiiHiuiHiiuuiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiuiiiiiiiwiiiiiiiHiHiiiiHiHiiHiiiuiuiiMiiiiiiiiimmiiniiiiiHmHHmHiiiiiHiimHiHHiiiinNiiwiniiiimMHuiNiM^ 




Established 1890 

Low Prices Square Dealing" 
Keep us busy 



■^iiiniiiHiMiiiiiiiininiiiiinHniniiiMHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiitiiniiiiiiiiiMriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiitiiiiiMiiiiiiiiniMiiiHiiiiiimtMiiiiniiiiiHii^ 

I College Jewelrv 

I Engraved Cards and Invitations 

I Chafing Dishes, Copper and Brass Goods 

I Special Die Stationer/ 

X 

i 21 South Side Square 



I Piepenbrlogs Variety Store 

I One block east of College 

I HERE TO PLEASE 

I Candies Cakes 

I Cookies Pies 

I Sandwiches Pop on Ice 

I Groceries California Fruits 

I School Suppiies 




mM3 



Jacksonville's foremost Men's Store 

Mackinaw and Sweater Coats 

Mannish Cut and Perm Pitting 

Hand Bags, Suit Cases and 
Trunks 

I. W. C. Banners and Pillows 

SPECIAL DESIGNS ON REQUEST 



Miss J. — "How did the Roman wedding day begin? " 
M. C. — "The day began early in the morning." 



jLadies' Late Style Sweater 
Coats 



Are Sold by 



prank Byrns 



Hat 
Store 



C. S.MARTIN 

Wall Paper, Painting 

and Interior Decorating' 

Pictures and Frames 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 
Jacksonville, 111. 



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I 



F 
E 

R 

N 

FROM S 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

Both Phones 



Cut flowers 



Classy Styles 
Vc will be pleased to show you our line 

FROST & NOLLEY 

Fashionable Footwear 

For All Occasions 
33 South Side Sq. Jacksonville, 111. 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

AlvBANY, N. Y. 

MAKERS OF 

CAPS 

GOWNS and 
HOODS 

To the American Colleges and Univer- 
sities from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 
Class contracts a specialty. 




L. R. (in Art studio)— "What's a death mask? " 
I. C. — "Why, a death mask is what they put over a 
man's face so that it can be used when he is dead." 



Dorwan Market 

AIvLr KINDS OF 

FRESH and SALT MEATS 
FISH, POULTRY, Etc. 

Both phones 196 230 W. State St. 

IIIIHIHIMIIIIIIIIUIIIIHIIIIUIIIIIIIIUmillllllllinillllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIHII 



KODAK FINISHING | 

Vulcan Roll Films | 

Cameras from $2.00 up | 

Everything- strictly first class I 

Vail & Vail | 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. f 
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^HllllllttllllinlllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Successor to McCullougfh Bros. 



E)ast Side Square 



i 

1 Ca.ineras> Films, Papers, 




1 Photo Supplies for Kodakers 
|DeveIopingf, Printing and Mounting 


S. S. Kresge C( 


1 at reasonable prices 

E 


5c & IOC Store 


1 Armstrongs Drug Store 


New and Up-to-Date 


1 South West Corner Square 

E 





M. H., describing a horse she was to sell — "He is six 
feet tall and weighs two hundred and fifty pounds." 
Miss N. — "Mary, did you ever weigh a horse? " 



I Ask your grocer for 

I HOLSUM 

I BREAD 

I Made Clean. Delivered clean 
I in waxed paper wrappers 



tNIHMIiHWHHUIHIUIIHmiHIIMIHIIHIHIUIHIIWIIHHIHIHIIIUIIIIIHmilimillllHIIHHIHUIHHIIHtlHIHIUIWIIMIHUUIItlHIIIIUHIIUIW 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Art Needle Work 
and Millinery 

an West state Street 



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Otto Speith 

photo portraiture 



Our Portraits were accepted and hung at the National Convention 
in Kansas City 1913 



Formerly Watson Studio 



Southwest Corner Square 



Seraphina, when the vibrator was misplaced — Miss 
Miner, did you find your radiator? 



rO to 

MULLENIX & 

For Everything Sweet 

Hot and Cold Sodas 

216 East state Street 



Coover & Slireve] 

Have a complete line of | 

Drugs, Kodaks, Perfumes, j 
Stationery and Holiday Gifts! 

We do Developing- & Printinja;-| 
East and West Side Square I 



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I It will pay you to visit 

SCHRAM'S 

Jewelry Store 

COLLEGE PINS, RINGS, SPOONS, ETC. 



I Len G. Magill 
I Printer 

I Bast State Street 111. Phone 418 



"TAYLOR: 

Grocery 

A g-ood place to trade 
221 West State Street 



X. — Your light was on pretty late last night. 

Z. — I had to see the nurse. I was ill. 

X. — It must have been a lingering illness! 



I Montgomery & Deppe 

I IN THEIR NEW PLACE ON THE WEST SIDE 01 
I THE SQUARE ARE SHOWING 

I EVERYTHING IN 

I Dry Goods and Ready-to-Wear Garments 

I Telephone for the Fall Catalogue 

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INTECSiFJIXV | 

Tz. have built up our GROCERY and DRUG Departments on a soli^ 
lundation of INTEGRITY. In our GROCERY and DRUGS WE! 
A.Y WHAT WE BELIEVE, and our customers BELIEVE WHAT| 
T^E SAY. Every item in our store is an example of PURE FOOD J 
LEAN FOOD, GOOD FOOD and BEST DRUGS. I 

lURS is a GROCERY AND DRUG STORE with a CONSCIENCE! 

hone* 800 X^QBIBK^TS ':^':Hj(D^. Phones 800 j 

Grocery —Pharmacy | 

29 South Side Sq. | 



Pictorial Review Patterns 

For Sale at 



J^^ 



a/y/io/id 



DRY GOODS STORE 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 § 

A. L. Bromley | 

Ladies' Tailor i 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and | 

Repairing. Ladies' Man Tail- | 

ored Suits to order. Remodeling | 

of all kinds. Special rates to | 

I. W. C. students. All work | 

called for and delivered promptly | 



Note to table teacher — "Miss B., please excuse Miss 
W. as she has a glass of milk in her room. 



111. Phone 57 



Bell Phone 92 



Fresh Drugs, 
Fancy Goods 
Stationery 



THE 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



Ba(]Q6r Drug Store 

2 doors West of Postoffice 

235 E. State Street 
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Andre & Andre 

Bverything" in 

High Grade House Furnishii 

for E^verybody, Everywhere 
46-50 North Side Square 




I CAFE BATZ 

I And Annex for Ladies 

I 221-223 East State Street 

llUinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy- 
Waists and Dresses 
a Specialty 

230 East State St. Jacksonville, II 
Illinois Phone 388 



In psychology class — (Mary mixing her analogies). 
Miss M. — "Mary, I'd rather you'd stick to the chair." 

L. H. — Oh, that mental stuff that we think with. 



I Florence Kirk King 
I Hair Dresser 

I special Service in Shampooing 
I Scalp Treatment, Manufacturing 
I Hair into Latest Styles 
I Work done by appointment 
I 111. Phone 837 503 W. College St. 



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Cherry's Liver) 

Finest Light and Hca^ 
Livery 
Lowest Rates 

235-237, 302-304-306 North Main Sti 



HIIIIIIIMnilHMIIHIIMHIIMHIIIIMIIHIIIIIMIhMMIintiniMIIIIIIMIIIIIIinMIMIlllllMllllllllllllllllillllinilll!lllllllliltlllllllll!IIIIIIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII(llllllinilllllimm>. 



iris, P. 



jrir 



mze our ildver 



s 



Ayers National Bank 

Founded 1852 



Capital 
^200,000 

Surplus 
^^0,000 




Deposits 

$1,2^0,000 

United States 
Depository 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 

Special Window for Ladies 
Ladies' Waiting- Room 
We make a feature of Ladies' Accounts, and have 
provided facilities for their exclusive use 



OFFICERS i 

I. p. Danlap, PrMident O. F. Buffe, Cashier I 

.ndrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 1 

l. M. Hockenhall, Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst. Cashier I 

C. G. Rutledge, Vice President I 



>wen P. Thompson 
tdward F. Goltra 
ohn W. I^each 



DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhull 
M. F. Dunlap 



Harry M. Capps I 
O. F. Baffe f 

Andrew Russel I 



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Cafe 



Confectionary 



Kbeacock Inn 



Catering- 



Soda 



Candies 



i SKIRT BOXES 




i ROCKERS. SCREENS, 




j DESKS AND 


GAY'S 


1 BED ROOM CURTAINS 


RELIABLE 


i 

1 AT 


HARDWARE 


jJohnson, Hackett & Guthrie 





Freshman (translating "Es stand am Bache und 
Weinte") — "It stood on its back and wept." 



SHEET MUSIC, MUSIC MERCHANDISE 

TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 

AND SUPPLIES 



I 19 SOUTH SIDB PUBWC SQUARB 

X 

£ 

ft«HIIIUIUIIIIIIUIIWUIlnHIIUIIIIIIIIUIIIinilllllllMIIIIIIUIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIillHIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIUIIIIUIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIinilllllllUHIirtHIIIIIIIUHIIIIM 



iimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiniiiitiniiiiMiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiliiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii£ 

J. BART JOHNSON | 

Everything Musical | 

PIANOS, PLAYER PIANOS, VICTROLAS, | 

IMPORTE)R OF VIOLINS, AND A COMPLETE | 

LINE OF MUSICAL MERCHANDISE I 



9 South Side Square 



R. AltBYN Lincoln Adams 

Oculist and Aurist 
to the State School for the Blind 

323 West State Street 



Practice limited to diseases of the 
Bye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



DR. ALPHA B. APPLEBEE[ 
Dentist [ 

326 West state St. I 



Miss A. (in library) — "Please, may I call on you to 
help me find Hawthorne's Hiawatha? " 



DR. BYRON S. GAILEY 

EYE, EAR, 
NOSE AND THROAT 



Office and Residence 
340 West State Street 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 
Jno. B, Snell, Prop. 
Rates J2.25, I2.50, and I3.00 per day 
One Block West of Womans College 
Opposite Post Office 
Rooms with or without bath 
Local and Long Distance Telephone 

in every room. 



IIIIIIIMIIHUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinillimilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllllll IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIUIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIlS 




Hnsic Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1860 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEG 

College of Liberal Arts 

(Full classical and scientific courses) 

College ot Music . | 

School of Fine Arts I 

School of Expression j 

School of Home Economics ' 

^A Standard College — one of the best. j 

Regular college and academy courses I 

leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- - 

inently a Christian college with every i 

facility for thorough work. Located ] 

in the Middle West, in a beautiful, ,| 

dignified, old college town, noted for j 

its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking for a good college. 

Call or address, Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, 111. 




^INIIIIIIIIIimiimNIHIHIIIHmiHIIIIIiniHIIIMIIimHimitlHUWIIIIIUIMIIHIMIIIirlllllllllNIIWIIIUnMIIIIUHilMUIUUHHUIIIMHHIIIMtlMNIH^ 



Cfje College (^reetmgg 

€ff The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
€|f Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

€JI Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
€J} Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



Contents 

The Nativity 3 

The Other Shepherd 4 

Be a Good Fellow 5 

The Christmas Stamps 6 

The Consumer's League 8 

TheS. P. U. G.'s 9 

Jacob Riis and the Christmas Spirit 10 

Poem — December the Kighteenth .11 

Bobbey's Plum Pudding 13 

On Christmas Eve 15 

No Santa Claus 16 

Why the Mistletoe clings to the Oak ..... ,17 

A Christmas Tradition 18 

The Christmas Stocking 20 

The Christmas Party 21 

The Christmas Carols 21 

Christmas Candies [Chafing Dish Recipes] 21 

Editorials — What has it meant? 23 

Christmas Package 24 

Christmas Suggestions 24 

The College Calendar and Locals 25 

The Endowment Fund 30 

Society Notes 32 

lUiwoco Notes 33 

Department Notes 34 

To Our Exchanges 36 



The 
Graphic Arts 

CoifCKRN 



41. "And the angel said unto them, Fear not, for, 
behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which 
shall be to all people. 

^ For unto you is born this day in the city of David 
a Savior, which is Christ the Lord. 

^ And this shall be a sign unto you: Ye shall find 
the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a 
manger. 

^ And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude 
of the heavenly host praising God, and saying: 

41, Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, 

good will toward men." 

— Luke 2:10-14.. 





Wi^t College #reettngs( 




ZCbe College (3r eetingg 

Vol. XVII Jacksonville, 111., Christinas, 191 3 No 4 



THE NATIVITY OF CHRIST 

Among the Jewish people the prophecy of the coming 
of a king had been handed down from generation to gen- 
eration until such a wonderful being was pictured that few 
people were willing to recognize the promised Messiah in 
the little baby who came to this earth so many, many 
years ago at Christmas time. 

Out on the hills, shepherds were watching their flocks 
that might when an angel choir sang to them the im- 
mortal words, "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth 
good will to men." One of that great heavenly company 
came to the frightened shepherds with the comforting 
words, "Fear not: for behold, I bring you good tidings 
of great joy. Unto you is born this day in the city of 
David, a Saviour which is Christ the Lord." 

They were to know the child by means of the heavy 
swaddling clothes and the rude manger in which he lay. 
These shepherds went to see the promised king and found 
everything just as the angels had announced, so they re- 
turned to their work, telling to all people the wonderful 
things of which the angels sang. 

Wise men journeying from far countries came to 
pay homage to the new-born king, bringing gifts, gold 
and frankincense and myrrh. All the long distances 
that they travelled they were guided by a wonderful star, 
ever moving onward. On reaching Jerusalem they in- 
quired of King Herod where to find the child who had 
been born king of the Jews, that they might worship him. 

Herod was troubled over this for he wished to be the 
only ruler; therefore he asked of the Wise men a descrip- 

Page Three 



^f)e CoUege Greetings; 




tion of the star, when it had appeared to them, and finally 
asked them to come again and let him know when they 
had found him, that he, also ; might go and worship. 

On leaving Jerusalem the star went before and finally 
stopped over the place in Bethlehem where Christ lay. 
After giving him the gifts which they brought, the Wise 
men departed from Judea by another way, for God 
warned them in a dream against Herod. 

After Herod found that the Wise men had gone with- 
out telling him of the child, he issued a command that all 
boy babies two years old or under should be killed. 
Joseph and Mary took Christ and fled by night into Egypt 
until they were told of the death of Herod. 

Each year we celebrate at Christmas time the birth- 
day of Christ and pay him homage as did the shepherds 
and Wise men in the long ago time of his babyhood. 

Helen Pawson, '17. 

"THE OTHER SHEPHERD" 

The shepherd stood outside the door of his sick 
friend's home, pondering on all the wonderful news that 
had been told him. For the shepherds had "returned 
glorifying and praising God for all the things which they 
had seen and heard," and in particular, had they hastened 
to impart the story to the fellow shepherd who had stayed 
behind to care for a sick man, so missing their marvellous 
experience. A great disappointment now welled up in 
his heart as he asked himself, "Why did I not forsake 
everything even as my brothers forsook their flocks?" 

Then a voice broke into his musings saying, "Follow 
me," and an angel form led him upon a hill. Here there 
was unrolled to him a vision of the age old world released 
from its bondage of sin. Love and abiding peace had 
taken the place of all unrest and dissension. Men lived 
as brothers with no more suppression of the humble; 
neither were the mighty exalted above their fellows. It 

Page Four 



^ije College Greetings; 




was a world from which pride, hatred and envy had de- 
parted. 

The shepherd marvelled and said, "Is not this 
heaven?" But the angel answered him, "Nay, this is 
but the life of Christ in the soul of man. For he shall 
live, forever increasing", till his dominion shall have no 
end." Then eagerly the shepherd said, "He comes as the 
mighty One foretold to destroy the enemies of Israel." 
But again the angel answered, "The Lord Christ comes 
not as a mighty warrior, hut as the saviour of a suffering 
sin-sick world to minister to the poor and the down trod- 
den, to comfort the broken hearted, to establish peace in 
the world that men may love one another even as breth- 
ren. So shall the golden age of Christ usher in the golden 
age of man. Then shall all bondage cease, all fetters fall 
and love shall reign with Christ supreme in the heart of 
man." 

Then softly the angel added, "Though thou didst not 
hear the angel's song of peace on earth with the fellow 
shepherds and didst not worship with them in Bethlehem, 
still thou hast seen the Christ, for it was the spirit of 
Christ like love that kept thee in the sick man's house." 

At these words great joy entered in the shepherd's 
heart, as he stood mediating upon them, the angel with- 
drew. Then round about him were only the rugged 
Judean hills, and the hut of the sick man nearby. 

Miriam Akers, '15. 

"BE A GOOD FELLOW" 

About three years ago the Chicago Sunday Tribune 
printed this heading in large type. Below it was the 
story of a child's pitiful letter to Santa Claus. No doubt 
there were innumerable pitiful letters to the dear old 
Saint, but this particular letter fell into the hands of a 
young reporter. He was touched by the childish desires 
and poverty stricken tone of the tear stained letter. "I'll 

Page Five 




^ije College ^reetingst 



be a good fellow" he said, "and give this poor youngster a 
real Chritsmas." 

This story in the paper created a sensation and there 
were so manypeopleclamoringto be "Good Fellows" that 
the Tribune secured a list of the names of poor children 
and poor families which was printed in the paper. "Good 
Fellows" were so prompt in offering to give these people 
a real Christmas that another and yet another list was 
printed. Men and women who were accustomed to let 
charity organizations take care of their Christmas giving 
felt the human appeal and claim of this personal giving 
and responded to it. 

Other newspapers printed the story of the Tribune's 
successful Good Fellow movement, and interested the 
people in their own communities in it, until now it has 
spread all over the country. The name "Good Fellows" 
in itself is attractive but its stand for true brotherliness 
and Christmas spirit without the patronizing air of charity 
is commendable and splendid. 

Phyllis Wilkinson, '17. 

THE CHRISTMAS STAMP 

It was Jacob Riis whose philanthropic interests are 
ever awake, who was so interested by receiving a letter 
bearing the Denmark Christmas stamps and so righteously 
jealous of the good accomplished by them in Denmark's 
Tuberculosis war, that he wrote an article for the Outlook 
July 1906 in the endeavor to arouse a sentiment for 
Christmas stamps in the United States. This was perhaps 
the first that had ever been said publicly to acquaint the 
American people with the possibilities in the little holiday 
sticker. Mr. Riiis dwelt upon the fact that when Den- 
mark enlisted Santa Claus in her campaign against the 
white plague, people had responded amazingly. He 
pointed out too, that it was not only a financial but an 
educational factor for, with his curiosity aroused by the 

Page Six 




^f)e CoUese ^uttinQH 



stamp, every Dane had been anxious to know more about 
the dread disease of which the Christmas stamp was the 
avowed foe. The latter thought was particularly signifi- 
cant to Mr. Riis because, as he said, "When people want 
to know, half the fight is won." 

The seed which was so earnestly sown in this article 
began to bear fruit in Delaware. The Anti-Tuberculosis 
Society, not an altogteher prosperous and flourishing 
organization in that state, received the hearty support of 
the Red Cross and with it the support of the government 
and the postal authorities in this newest project. There 
was little expense attached to the issuing of this first intall- 
ment of stamps, for the design was made for love of the 
cause, the advertising done with out charge and banners 
made from donated muslin were carried free by the street 
cars. They were issued December 7, 1906, just eighteen 
days before Christmas and by the end of the holiday sea- 
son nearly four hundred thousand had been sold and three 
thousand dollars had been added to the funds of the little 
Delaware society. The educational element which Mr. 
Riis had promised was by no means lacking. Educational 
exhibits were made, lectures given, and school children 
instructed to respond to the newly aroused interest 
throughout the state. 

The success of Delaware brought congratulations and 
commendations from all over the country. After con- 
sideration, the National Red Cross Associatiion planned 
to adopt the little Danish immigrant by having the words, 
"American National Red Cross" stamped along the edge, 
into a full fledged American reformer. The stamp is 
provided by the American Red Cross and the National 
Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis, 
and sold by the states. Ten per cent of the money re- 
ceived is required to pay the expenses of issuing and the 
rest is devoted to Tuberculosis work in the localities 
where the seals are sold. 



Page Seven 



tS^tie College ^rtttin^si 



For this year 110,000,000 stamps are to be provided. 
This number contrasted with the 400,000 of the first issue 
shows its growth in popularity. Since it was fully Amer- 
icanized by its adoption ever here, $150,000 has been 
raised through its sale. 

Ruth Want, '16. 

THE CONSUMERS* LEAGUE 

"Just one week until Christmas and not a Christmas 
present made or purchased; I suppose I'll wait until the 
last minute, I usually do," exclaimed one of the best 
hearted and best meaning girls in school. And she is one 
of the many, many thousands of woman shoppers who 
make the working men and women suffer. Few of us 
realize that we, the consumers and purchasers, are the 
cause of some of our worst social evils. This fact is 
brought home to us each year by the Consumers' League. 
This was an organization founded in 1890 by women for 
women, but lately men are taking an active interest and 
the many honorary vice-presidents are professors and stu- 
dents of economics and social work. 

The constitution states that the purpose of the League 
is to "secure adequate investigation of the conditions 
under which goods are made in order to enable purchasers 
to distinguish in favor of goods made in well ordered fac- 
tories." Such goods are identified by the League's white 
label. To be a "fair house," of which New York now 
has sixty, one must give equal pay for work of equal 
value, irrespective of sex, in wages received by the week; 
the hours must not exceed those from 8 :00 a. m. to 
6:00 p. m., and a general half holiday must be given on 
one day each week for at least the summer months. A 
vacation is given with pay, and children under fourteen 
are not employed in "fair houses." 

The Consumers' League urges the early Christmas 
shopping, finished at least by the fifteenth of December; 

Page Eight 




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the shopping early in the morning and the carrying of 
one's own trivial packages. The League has done much 
to alleviate the Christmas rush, the sweating system, the 
unsanitary conditions in factories, the hard work of the 
clerks, and has helped in the work against child labor. 
Yet, much of the work rests with us the consumers, and 
we at the Woman's College might take our pledge with 
Byrn Mawr and Wellesley, to shop early in the day and 
early in the season and to do all in our power to aid the 
cause of the working man and woman. 

Lucile McCloud, '16. 

S. P. U. G. 

The Society for the Prevention of Useless Giving 
attracted a great deal of attention last year, chiefly be- 
cause Mrs. August Belmont and Miss Anne Morgan were 
interested in it. Its members are known as "Spugs" from 
the initials of the name of the society. The original pur- 
pose of this society was to relieve girls employed in busi- 
ness establishments of the tax put on their earnings by 
the custom of giving fine presents to the department heads 
with the money raised among the employes. 

Of course, no girl was forced to contribute but it was 
hard to refuse when it seemed to be the tacit understand- 
ing that employes should combine to make these gifts. 

The Spugs do not disapprove of making Christmas 
gifts but they do hope to inaugurate a saner, more cheer- 
ful method of making gifts. The Christmas season, with 
its rush and worry, has come to be dreaded by a great 
many people. Gifts that are given simply because one 
expects a gift from that person, or because the recipient 
is a relative, are not made in a spirit that will arouse any 
Christmas kindliness or good will. 

Mrs. Belmont says that the Spugs attack this collective 
giving which is almost compulsory at Christmas and which 
results in an unfair taxation of the working people. They 

Page Nine 



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Vlufit Cottegc ^reetingsf 




attack, too, the exchange system of giving which has de- 
generated into an abuse of Christmas and is no more than 
a common swap, devoid of all sentiment and meaning. 
The Spugs did not organize to prevent giving. Mrs. Bel- 
mont says to give generously but not from fear or because 
of custom, but for the pleasure or help that may be be- 
stowed on others and for the love and joy of giving. 

E. Robb, '16. 



JACOB RIIS 

Jacob Riis, on the evening of the twenty-eighth, 
turned our thoughts into the train of the real Christmas 
spirit. With an optimism that is the only hope of the 
work such as he is doing with the firm belief in the image 
of God in all manlcind, he introduced us to our neighbors, 
the other half. In the simplicity and modesty that comes 
only when the feeling of what is to be done overshadows 
the accomplished, he showed us not only the dwelling 
places of our neighbors but also the characters of those 
people of whom we are so much of the time forgetful. 
Foreigners, he says, they are, to be sure, but with the 
material for the making of American citizens; foreigners 
who respond to the call of America's needs in such a way 
that the native citizens might be envious; foreigners who 
are conscious of their brother's needs and play the part of 
the good Samaritan without asking for reward; neighbors 
of whom we should not be ashamed, but neighbors who 
would respond more quickly to the call of humanity than 
the people to whom want is unknown. "Let us not take 
away poverty," he said, "but let us take the sting and suf- 
fering from poverty that it may be a blessing to our na- 
tion." 

The part of the well fed half is to find its neighbor, 
"to sit by the hearts of men" looking for the image of 
God which is alike in the rich and the poor, and to give 

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service where service is needed. When every man pays 
what is due to his neighbor in money and service then can 
man meet man in the true spirit of the Christmastide. 

FROM THE "MAKING OF AN AMERICAN" 

"I am a firm believer in organization of charities. 
But I am glad we have one season in which we can forget 
our principles and err on the side of mercy, that little cor- 
ner in the days of the dying year for sentiment and no 
questions asked. No need to be afraid. It is safe. 
Christmas charity never corrupts. Love keeps it sweet 
and good — the love He brought into the world at Christ- 
mas to temper the hard reason of man. Let it loose for 
that little spell. January comes soon with its long cold, 
always, it seems to me, the longest month in the year. 
It is so far to another Christmas." — Jacob Riis. 



DECEMBER THE EIGHTEENTH 

What do you suppose I heard, 

Just the other day? 
What do you suppose was said, 

Just the other day? 
I was comin' 'long so gay 

From the studio, 
Heard some Freshmen talkin' 

On the floor below. 
One of them was sayin' loud, 

"Land, but I'm excited — " 
And I kept a-listenin' 

Tho' I was not invited. 
"Just to think we're goin' home 

In barely two more weeks — " 
Then a few more exclamations 

And some joyous squeaks. 
"Half the fun is lookin' forward, 

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Arn't you glad you're you? 
Poor old girls can't 'predate 

Home like me and you." 
"Humph!" says I, and leaned way over 

To express my great disdain, 
Looking from the floor above them 

Down upon the twain. 
"Let me tell you, gentle maidens. 

You are making one mistake 
When you think you are the only 

Ones who Home-go-itis take. 
Look at me — I'm fair to bustin' 

For December the eighteenth." 
O'er the bannister in talking, 

Hanging by my toes I leant, • 
In my effort to convince them 

Quite excited I became. 
But I think all upper classmen 

Will agree I'm not to blame. 
But the Freshmen stuttered "Yes'm," 

Turned and fled and almost pale, 
So I finished to the silence 

Since they were beyond my hail — 
"Yes, you bet, an old girl loves it 

More than any New 'Un could, 
For you see she's been and done it." 

In my wrath quite still I stood, 
For I saw those frisky Freshmen 

Creeping back demure and good. 
"Please, Miss Junior, we're enlightened 

And we wish to say that we — 
Well, we wish — " their faces brightened — 

"We wish we were both Methus'lah, 
Who, like Seniors old and wise. 

Could more truly enjoy Christmas!" la! 
It pays to advertise! 

Peril Hess, '15. 

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tH^fje Collese ^reettnss^ 




In office on Dec. 7. L. G. — I wonder if Cecil Bur- 
roughs is going home, she has her suit case packed. 

George Metcalf — I guess she must be getting ready 
for the eighteenth. 

BOBBY'S PLUM-PUDDING 

"I'll take another piece of plum-pudding, mother," 
called out Bobby, who was scraping the last morsel of his 
third helping to that delicacy off his plate. 

"No, Bobby, four pieces are entirely too much for a 
little boy. I think you have had sufficient," gravely an- 
swered his mother. 

"I don't see why I can't have just one more piece. 
There's plenty of it and it won't hurt anybody but myself 
if I do eat some more. We don't have plum-pudding 
every day and I don't see why I can't have enough for 
once," argued Bobby. 

"Bobby," interrupted his father, "you have heard 
what your mother has said. Now, obey." 

"Why, how can you talk so, John? Christmas comes 
only once a year. Let the dear child have his fill. 
Grandmother will give you all you want, Bobby. Now 
eat this and if you want some more I will help you to it." 
Thus the kind old lady spoke as she placed a huge slice of 
plum-pudding upon Bobby's plate. 

Bobby's face was immediately illuminated by a vast 
smile. His grandmother beamed but the mother and 
father remained silent. 

Dinner was soon over. "Son," addressed Mr. Lang- 
ston, "it's time for you to take your nap, so run along." 

"I don't want to go to sleep," murmured Bobby. 
"Yes I do, too, I'm so tired and my head hurts." 

"You will feel better after you take a nap. Be a good 
little boy and go up stairs," spoke the grandmother. 

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"Yes, and you may have some more plum-pudding 
when you come down again," laughingly called the father 
to Bobby slowly ascending the stairs. 

Bobby was no sooner asleep than a little chubby man 
appeared to him. "Do you want to go to Toyland with 
me? " he whispered in Bobby's ear. 

Bobby started and exclaimed, "O! are you Santa 
Claus?" 

"Now be real quiet and we'll slip out of the window 
and you shall see my home." 

Bobby and the queer old gentleman, drawn by the 
fleet-footed deer, flew through the iar. Presently they 
arrived at the palace of snow and ice. Santa Claus led 
the way and Bobby followed. The room was filled with 
the odor of plum-pudding. "He must be looking for 
Christmas," thought Bobby. 

"Now I'll show you the toy shop," said his guide. 

Here Bobby beheld dolls, hobby-horses, jumping- 
jacks, trains and all kinds of toys dear to the hearts of boys 
and girls. But why did they look so queer.? Every sin- 
gle toy was made of plum-pudding. Some were still 
steaming hot while others were cold. 

"Why did you make them all out of plum-pudding? " 
inquired Bobby. 

"Because all the little boys and girls like plum-pud- 
ding so well and I thought it would be grand to have some- 
thing new this year. Don't you want to play with some 
of the toys?" 

"No I don't, I want to go home. I don't like plum- 
pudding. Let loose of my hand, I tell you. I'm going 
home," screamed Bobby. 

Bobby awoke to find the doctor at the bed-side. He 
was saying to his mother, "It is only a case of indigestion 
and he will recover presently." As he saw that Bobby 
was now awake he slapped him on the knee and said, 
"you are better, aren't you, son?" 

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Bobby nodded. All of a sudden something occurred 
to him. "Say, mother," he cried out, "I'm glad my toys 
aren't made of plum-pudding." 

Norma Perbix, '17. 

ON CHRISTMAS EVE 

It was a beautiful Christmas eve, beautiful even in 
the big crowded city. The snow was still falling softly 
as it had been all day, softly but so thickly that even the 
greedy street cleaners could not sweep it up or the hungry 
traffic soil it before it had transmitted its message to the 
eager crowd. Light gleamed forth from every door, not 
just light but radiant Christmas light. 

The streets were crowded with the usual throng of 
eleventh hour shoppers, of interested onlookers, of belated 
travelers, each intent on his own interests, jostling and 
crowding where necessary, yet all full of the Christmas 
spirit that heeded not the jostling and crowding of others. 
An everchanging group of faces pressed against each shop 
window on the other side of which fairyland flourished in 
full power and glory but only now and then could this 
mystic chain extend its sway for any appreciable length of 
time. 

Only the ragged little boy and his wan little sister 
halted indefinitely to gaze at the wonders within. What 
mattered it to them if the wind pierced through their 
scanty garments as they lived in the land of the make- 
believe, as they warmed themselves at the fire-place on the 
other side of the window and played with the toys that 
could never be theirs. Yet a fleeting touch of longing 
and sorrow passed over the face of the boy as he looked 
down at his little sister and thought of the unattainable. 
Suddenly his meager face lighted up with radiance as a 
coin touched his fingers and the face of a white bearded 
Santa Claus smiled back at him, A moment of exulta- 
tion, then the children scampered off and were lost in the 

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tE'fit CoUese ^vtttinqa 




throng. The old man smiled reminiscently, then he too 
passed on as if content at having helped, if ever so little 
a way, to increase the spirit of Christmas. 

E. E. Elliot, '14. 

"NO SANTA CLAUS" 

Up the haychute a brown head appeared, the small 
body of a child followed, yet the child did not follow 
her favorite climb up through the hay, but resolutely 
made her way straight to the farthest corner, where she 
dropped dejectedly down in the hay, to think out the 
problem which had brought her to the lonesome 
place, on the cold winter's day. Quietly she sat, not even 
raising the hay to peer in to Speckle's nest, whose where- 
a-bouts was unknown to all but her. Nor did she welcome 
the small gray kitten which had climbed after her. 
"Maybe, you're not real either," she sobbed, as she pushed 
it away. Not real, Santa Claus not real, the Santa Claus 
who through those nine years had always brought exactly 
what she wanted. The Santa Claus who had eaten her 
doughnuts and drank the coffee she had so carefully 
prepared on each Christmas eve as long as she could 
remember. The Santa Claus who had written her letters 
telling how the lunch had cheered him and how much he 
appreciated having the door left unlocked, the chimneys 
were dirty, he always said, and men were building them so 
narrow that he found it almost impossible to get down. 
Santa Claus not real. She would not believe it. Mother 
had said there was a spirit of Santa Claus, but how could 
a spirit write notes, and drive eight tiny reindeer? She 
would ask Jesus to show her brother Santa Claus face to 
face ,but if Santa Claus wasn't real then maybe Jesus 
wasn't either. No Santa Claus, no Jesus, in complete 
dejection the brown head buried itself in the hay. Sob 
followed sob, until the small body became quiet and into 
the land of dreams she went where, at least, fairies and 
spirits are realities. 

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Jliit CoUese Greetings; 




WHY THE MISTLETOE CLINGS TO THE OAK 

Mistletoe was a lovely white lady, whose gentleness 
and goodness were known everywhere, and whom every- 
one loved. Among the most persistent of her lovers was 
Jack Frost. His suit was approved and advanced by 
mistletoe's brother, the bold North Wind, Jack Frost's 
godfather. He was constantly telling Mistletoe of all 
Jack Frost's virtues, the recital of which bored her. True, 
he was a handsome young chap but she couldn't always 
understand his sudden whims and caprices. He was jolly 
and gay and wooed her with cheerful persistence, in spite 
of her evident dislike for him. She wanted to love some- 
one but she was sure that Jack Frost was not the one. 

The North Wind became more and more impatient 
with her and treated her cruelly until one day, her patience 
gone, she fled. He pursued her, raging, into the woods. 
She ran before him, her lovely white and green garments 
trailing behind her. In her flight, she fled from tree to 
tree, clinging to one, only to be blown on again by her 
angry brother. There seemed to be none to help her. 
The little evergreen's prickly needles had pushed her off. 
They all seemed to repulse her. But suddenly she saw 
a tree to which she had not yet applied for refuge. Its 
broad, outstretching arms seemed to invite her to rest 
safely there. With the North Wind howling behind her, 
she rushed blindly toward the oak's protecting shelter 
and clung to its sturdy trunk with all her slender strength. 
Vainly did the North Wind try to dislodge her, blowing 
violently, but she was held securely in the arms of the big 
oak. Still raging, her brother gave up the struggle and 
went to seek Jack Frost to break the news to him and 
implore his aid for Mistletoe's return. Jack Frost's grief 
was keen and he was only to glad to attempt to regain her 
for himself. In vain did he pinch her, frosting her nose, 
her ears, her finger tips, but he could not dislodge her 
nor even seem to hurt her. 

/' Page Seventeen 



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At last, he departed, leavig poor little Mistletoe with 
her sturdy protector, who bent to whisper lovingly, "They 
shall never hurt you, little white lady, and you shall belong 
to me always." 

Bending still lower he kissed her gently. 

Ever since, has the Mistletoe clung to the oak and 
neither the keen Wind from the north nor the biting 
Frost has been able to separate them. Ever since, too, 
has the charm of the yuletide clung to the Mistletoe and 
the spice of danger hovered around the head of a maid 
who dares to stand beneath it. 

Winifred Robinson, '17. 



A CHRISTMAS TRADITION 

Mrs. Karson knitted industriously a few moments, then 
paused and looked out across the snow covered prarie. 
The wind blew the snow into huge drifts and at times 
beat against the window with a fury that threatened to 
destroy the panes. 

The room from which this scene was viewed served 
as kitchen, dining room and living room. A long table 
which stood in the center, served as an eating board and 
work table. At one end were some coarse white dishes 
and cheap cutlery which were set in neat array on the well 
scrubbed boards. 

Mrs. Karson was thinking of Christmas day in the 
fatherland, how the people made merry and were happy 
at their simple feasts. But this year how different! 
There were few to make merry with and the meal would 
be nothing unusual. Here people laughed and joked at 
the idea of Christmas spirits and to Mrs. Karson they were 
the largest part of the Christmas tide. 

Her husband and her two small children had driven 
to a store some few miles distant to buy, if possible, some 
dainty to add to their usual fare. At last she saw the team 
in the distance and walked slowly to the barn to await 

Page Eigliteen 



^ije CoHcge (^reetingg 



their arrival. As she waited she thought of the old Christ- 
mas tradition that at midnight if Christmas Eve the cattle 
knelt in their stalls, because Christ was born in a manger. 
She had heard that evil would come upon any person and 
their family if found spying upon the cattle at this hour. 
Often she had read of this tradition and wondered if it 
really were true. Should she dare watch at midnight, no 
one would ever need to know. 

She started guiltily as her husband's hearty halloa 
echoed through the barn. Without answering she took 
the children and went towards the house. The rest of 
the day dragged slowly on and the evening was long. At 
last bedtime came and with it sleep to most of the family 
but not to Mrs. Karson. 

She waited anxiously until she heard the clock strike 
eleven, then the half hour. She crept slowly out of bed, 
dressed and stole silently out into the night. At last she 
settled down on a pile of hay from which the cattle could 
be seen in a dim outline. Suddenly a loud noise and a 
bright flash of light caused her to fly in terror from the 
barn. She reached the house and, stumbling, fell in the 
doorway. 

When she woke she found herself lying near the half- 
open door. For many days she tossed wearily on her bed 
and always before her was a bright light. Then one day 
her children were taken ill and when her German neigh- 
bors came in to help and comfort her they were told of her 
midnight watch, and as they left they nodded their heads 
knowingly. 

Margaret Dorman, '17. 



I. C. to G. J. — I thought your man was coming for 
Thanksgiving. 

G. J. — He was but he broke his arm playing football 
and has to wait until he can use it. 



Page Nineteen 



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^^ 




THE CHRISTMAS STOCKING 
Hopes 

Dr. Marker — Many large additions to the Endowment 
Fund and Science Building. (No more chemistry fumes 
in his office and parlors.) 

The College — A student building containing gymna- 
sium and student parlors. 

The bell on third floor Marker placed over the door 
of room 185. 

For M. C. W. — A secretary. 

For G. Upp — An unlimited light permission. 

George — Everything Santa Glaus forgets to bring. 

Mrs. Marker — The appreciation and good will of all 
of the girls. 

The Annual — Success and long life. 

For Art editor — Some unexpected cartoons. 

Subscriptions from every one in the house. 

For editor — No period of depression. 

Miss Mothershead — No cold winds on the northwest 
corner. This small stocking cannot hold the rest and joy 
the girls are wishing you this Christmas time. 

The Faculty: Miss Johnston — A curling iron. 
Miss Cowgill — A large blanket to take to Matanzas 
next year. 

Miss Anderson — One dozen kid curlers. 



Page Twenty 




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Miss Stevenson — Book entitled "How to Chaperone." 
Miss Neville — A class. 

The Greetings — Contributions (poems, stories, seri- 
ous papers). All subscriptions paid. 

THE CHRISTMAS PARTY 

Often one or two children have been guests at the 
College, but never until the invitation issued to the chil- 
dren of the Free Kindergarten has the College had the 
privilege of entertaining forty-five real live children. The 
Y. W. C. A. invited them for a Christmas party. The 
girls provided them with the things that Christmas always 
brino-s to little children. 



CAROLS 

Slipping along the dark, silent streets, peeping into 
brightly lighted homes, the groups of carol singers go, 
stopping at intervals to sing beneath the windows of the 
shut-ins the "glorious story of old," coming back to the 
college tired but with a deeper knowledge of the true 
Christmas spirit which comes when joy is unselfishly given 
to others. 

CHRISTMAS CANDIES 
Fondant 

2 cups sugar f c. water 

I teaspoon cream of tartar 
Method — Mix ingredients in a smooth sauce-pan and 
heat gradually to the boiling point. Boil until mixture 
will form a soft ball when tested in cold water, stirring 
slowly only until sugar is dissolved. Wash sugar from 
sides of sauce-pan with a damp cloth. Pour into a but- 
tered dish, do not scrape the pan. Cool without disturb- 
ing until a dent made with the finger will hold its shape. 

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Stir until creamy and when stiff enough knead with the 
hands until perfectly smooth. This may then be worked 
up into cream candies, or chocolate creams, or used as 
stuffing for dates, or any way that is desired. 

Taffy 

2 c. molasses 

1 c. sugar 

2 T. butter 

1 t vinegar 

^ t. soda 

Cook the molasses, sugar, butter and vinegar together 
to the snap stage (brittle in cold water), stir in the soda 
and pour on a buttered plate. When cool enough to han- 
dle pull until light in color. Draw out in sticks and cut 
in one inch pieces. Wrap in oiled paper. 




Candled Orange Peel 

To candy orange, lemon or grape fruit rind, soak over 
night, then cut in tiny strips with scissors. Boil in three 
waters for twenty minutes each and drain. Have ready 
a syrup made by boiling equal parts of sugar and water 
and in this boil the rind until transparent. Drain and roll 
in fine granulated sugar. The grape fruit straws are new 
and especially delicious. 



There has been a great deal of discussion v/hether 
Tom's return should be placed with the alumnae notes or 
in the locals. Tom returned Monday. Everyone is glad 
to have him back. 



Page Twenty-two 




Cfje CoUese ^reetingsf 




Facui,TY Committbb— Miss Motherehead, Miss Baker, Miss 

JohnBton. 
Editor— Abbie Peavoy 

Associate Editors — Erma Elliott, Helena Monson, Helen McGhee 
BusiNBSS Managers — Geneva Upp, Winifred Bormeister, Alma 

Harmel 



WHAT HAS IT MEANT? 

Tomorrow some of us are going home for the first 
time since we came in September. To-morrow some of 
us are going home after our first term of college life. All 
of us are going home, some to little towns, some to cities, 
some to farms. Yet no matter where we go, the home 
folks, the town folks and the neighbors are going to care- 
fully scrutinize us to see what changes have come in our 
attitude, to see what college has meant to us. If it has 
meant that we can fit a little better into the place we left 
vacant, if we count it a privilege to give in some obstru- 
sive way some of the advantages which have come to us 
in three months, then indirectly our college will receive 
the credit, and in a small sense we will have paid our debt 
of loyalty to I. W. C. But if the little knowledge we have 
received makes us feel that we are apart from the people 
of our home towns, if we too enthusiastically try to force 
upon them new ideas which they are unwilling to accept, 
then upon us will be passed that time old sentence "Col- 
lege has spoiled her," and our college will be blamed. 

Dr. Marker presented the Greetings with a bound 
volume of the Greetings (1911-1913). The gift was 
appreciated. We believe that the Greetings office should 
own the bound volumes of the Greetings of former years 
as a library for reference. 

Corrections for mistakes made in the last three num- 
bers of the Greetings are as follows: All of the poems 
in the October number were written by Ann Marshall. 
The story, "His Brother's Keeper," in the December num- 
ber, was written by Alice Birch, '17. 

Page Twenty-three 



(E^fte College (ireetingg 



The Seniors regret that they are not to have another 
chance for the Wesley Mathers prize, but we should like 
to hear the Juniors and Sophomores talk about it. 



CHRISTMAS PACKAGES 

Send them early! Put on the outside, if you will, a 
pretty little "Do not open till Christmas," but — send 
them early. 

Wrap all parcels in good, strong, healthy paper. 
Delicate, tissue-wrapped ones may be more festive, but 
they probably won't arrive at their proper destination and, 
besides, you can have neat, smooth corners even with 
heavy wrapping paper. 

Do not tie them up with one slender cord. Boxes 
get crushed and cords break in the holiday jam. 

Write the address distinctly and in several places if the 
bundle is large, so that a search on all sides will not have 
to be made for it. Don't neglect to put on it your own, 
the sender's, name and address. 

Above all things do not seal your package. It isn't 
very funny when the other one receives a fifty-cent due 
gift. As first class every sealed package goes, you know. 

Helen McGhee, '17. 



CHRISTMAS SUGGESTIONS 

Christmas reading: 

The Blue Flower Henry Van Dyck 

The Christmas Carol Charles Dickens 

The Bird's Christmas Carol Kate Douglas Wiggin 

The Cobbler (poem) Edwin Markham 

The Uncrowned King Harold Bell Wright 
Miss Number 313 

Organize a group for the singing of Christmas carols 
to your shut-ins. 

Page Twenty-four 



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I 



Send your Christmas packages right av/ay. 
Remember the shop girls and do your shopping early. 
Wrap your packages to endure the crush of Christmas 
traveling. 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 

November 19 — Gettysburg Day. 

An interesting program was given by the faculty 
in the morning chapel: 
Miss Allen — My Captain. 
Miss Beebe, vocal solo — Recessional. 
Miss Parsons — Lincoln's Gettysburg Speech. 
Closing hymn — Star Spangled Banner. 

November 23 — Miss Weller, at the meeting of the Y. W. 
|- C. A., told of the work of the Associated Charities 
in Jacksonville, 

November 24 — The Senior Play. 

A great success was that Senior Play. If several 
members of the class had not their lives definitely 
planned, it would be suggested by the others that they 
turn to the stage for their life work. For the major- 
M, ity of the class this was their first appearances as 
I actresses and actor, but so emphatically did they in- 
I' terpret the "Mousetrap" that no one will now believe 
that, though with the exception of one they are not 
afraid of "the nasty, terrible, little reptile." That 
such can be the case is incredible, especially the lead- 
ing lady, who so completely disguised her true feel- 
ings that from now on she will be compelled to 
scream at the mere mention of a mouse. 

Financially the play was successful enough so that 
more than two-thirds of the Senior endowment 
pledge can be paid. 

To the dependable Sophomore class, vv^ho helped 
with the sandwich sale which followed and with the 
ushering, the Seniors extend their thanks. 

Page Twenty-five 



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To the Glee Club, who made their first appear- 
ance before the play, the same Senior class wish to 
express their appreciation. 

November 26 — Dr. Woltman began at chapel a series of 
lectures which are to be given to the student body 
concerning means to health. Ventilation was the 
subject of his talk. Air, he said, is a necessity, fresh 
air, wholesome air, a means of avoiding ills. Not 
only a means of preventing sickness, but a cure for 
most organic diseases. The greatest conclusion 
which can be drawn from his talk is that the thing 
which can prevent and cure illness is free. Not free 
for the asking but for the taking. Let us breathe, 
consciously at times, the free gift which will give us 
health. 

Thanksgiving baskets, which were filled with en- 
thusiasm, but likewise with eats, were sent by the 
girls to those recommended to us by Miss Weller. 

November 27 — Thanksgiving Day. 

In spite of the fact that many believed that 
Thanksgiving was going to be a rainy day, the sun 
shone at intervals all day. The sun might have 
made a difference in the happiness of the earlier part 
of the day, but when we were all gathered into the 
rosy lighted dining room which the Freshmen had 
transformed with their red and white, no one would 
have cared whether it was raining or not. When 
every trace of an appetite had disappeared Dr. Mar- 
ker introduced first Dr. McCarty, to whom the Col- 
lege feels that it has a special claim, then Mrs. Lam- 
bert, whom we almost count as one of the student 
body. After Dr. Hancher responded to Dr. Marker's 
request for a few words. Miss Edith Parsons read sev- 
eral selections. The College Song was the fitting 
close to the well enjoyed afternoon. 

November 28 — In preparation for the coming of Jacob 

Page Twenty-six 




Wiit CoHege ^reetingja! 



Riis, Miss Mothershead told us in chapel something 
of his life and his work. 

In Rby, a town on the coast of Denmark, Jacob 
Riis was born in the year of 1849. Contrary to the 
desire of his father, who was a teacher in the school 
Jacob chose the trade of carpentering in preference 
to a literary career. Tiring of carpentering, disap- 
pointed by the refusal of his childhood sweetheart, 
he left Denmark in 1870. New York was his land- 
ing place. For several years he changed from one 
occupation and place to another. His position as a 
police reporter led to his work among the tenements. 
He has been the instigator of bettering the housing 
conditions, opening play grounds for the cities' poor, 
organizing settlement work, establishing settlement 
houses. After a few years he returned to Denmark 
to bring back the Elizabeth who has been his com- 
panion in the work which he loves and brought to 
pass. 

November 28 — At an after dinner party Miss Mothershead 
entertained the mothers who have been visitors at 
the college and the faculty. Refreshments were 
served by the Seniors, 

November 29 — Saturday night. Nothing special going 
on. Fact appreciated by all. 

November 30 — Dr. Harker gave an unusually good talk 
about "My Neighbor." He pointed out the different 
laws God has given man in regard to the treatment 
of his neighbor. The first one was "eye for eye, 
tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot." That 
man should harm his neighbor no more than his 
neighbor harmed him was the first step toward our 
present Christianity. Until this time no man had 
any regard for his brother's rights. Strength and 
power alone had previously reigned. It was not 
until centuries later that we found the Golden Rule 



Page Twenty-seven 



tS^Ije CoQese ^reettngsi 




wielding its influence upon the relationship between 
man and man. But there was one law that far sur- 
passed these in its infinity. It is found in John 
13:34, "A new commandment I give unto you, that 
ye love one another; as 1 have loved you that ye 
also love one another." In this Christ not only 
gives the commandment to love one another but that 
we shall love one another as He has loved us. It is 
upon this that the present standard of all socialistic 
work is based. 
December 3 — Dr. Black instructed us during chapel time 
concerning the "First Aids to the Injured." 

Don'ts — 

Don't crowd about the injured person, let the one 
who knows how have a chance to work. 

Don't lost your head. 

Don't forget that articles to work with can be 
made of almost anything which is at hand. 

Don't, if a person is unconscious, give whiskey. 
If the unconscious man is drunk, alcohol will do more 
harm; if he is unconscious from other causes, then 
alcohol is the worst thing you can give. 

Dos — 

Get proper surroundings for the immediate com- 
fort of the injured. 

In case of drowning place patient on his face with 
arms under him, raise the body to let water run from 
lungs. If patient is not breathing, produce artificial 
breathing until regular breathing fifteen times a min- 
ute results. 

In case of injury lay patient on his back, lift head. 

In case of bleeding, know that there are three 
kinds of bleeding. Pressure will stop the capillary 
and bleeding from the veins, while a turniquet made 
from a handkerchief and stick twisted tightly above 
the wound will be necessary to stop bleeding from 
the arteries. 



Page Twenty-eight 



asasHretJWJKS'ttJisssa^xJiPj 




^^e CoQege Greetings 



December 3 — A very pretty wedding ceremony was per- 
formed in the Methodist Church of Ashland when 
Miss Annette Rearick became the bride of Joseph 
Lohman. 

The ceremony was preceded by the following mus- 
ical numbers given by Miss Nelle Smith of Beards- 
town, violinist, and Miss Thirza Woods of Kansas 
City, vocalist: 

Violin — Humoresque by Dvorak. 
Minuet, Beethoven. 

Voice— "What's in the Air To-day," Eden. 
"Love's Coronation." 

Preceding the bridal party Miss Jessie Marjorie 
Prince and Master Charles Edward Beadles entered 
carrying yellow ribbons by which an aisle was form- 
ed. Following them were the ushers, John Graff of 
Ashland and Harry Becker of Knoxville, ill. The 
bridesmaids were Miss Emma Pearn of Ashland and 
Miss Catherine Louise Gates of Jacksonville. They 
were followed by Miss Helen Rearick, a sister of the 
bride, as maid of honor. 

The bride entered on the arm of her father and 
was met at the altar by the groom and best man, 
Stewart Wyatt of Bloomington. The party entered 
while the wedding march from Lohengrin was played 
by Mrs. W. A. Baxter of Ashland and Miss Nelle 
Smith. During the ceremony, beautifully plighted 
by Rev. Mr. McPherson, the musicians played 
Traumerie by Schumann. The recessional was 
made by the use of Mendelssohn's wedding march. 

The bride is the youngest daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. W. S. Rearick of Ashland and is well and favor- 
ably known in Jacksonville, where she attended the 
Woman's College for several years, graduating in the 
class of 1912. 

The groom is the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Lohman and is regarded as a most excellent young 

Page Twenty-nine 




tS^t CoUege ^xtttitiQ^ 




man, possessed of much business ability. He was a 
student at Illinois College and also attended the Busi- 
ness College at Quincy. 

The following were guests from the College: 
Miss Stevenson, Miss Anderson, Miss Cowgill, Mrs. 
Hartmann, Irene Crum, Peril Hess and Marjorie 
Becker. 
December 4 — Council meeting. Exciting to say the least. 
Mass meeting Y. W. C. A. decided to ask the chil- 
dren from the Free Kindergarten down here on De- 
cember fifteenth to a Christmas party. 
December 6 — The subscription day for the Illiwoco an- 
nounced at chapel. 
December 7— Some rising bells rang, one was stuffed, the 
breakfast bell rang, six girls and four faculty mem- 
bers had the dining room to themselves. Where 
were all the others? Peaceably asleep, making the 
most of the privilege to "sleep through!" 
Vespers. (See College of Music notes.) 
December 8 — Miss Parsons and College Specials. 

Miss Allen's recital. 
December 12 — Term student Expression recital. 
December 1 3 — Y. W. C. A. Bazaar. 
December 1 4 — Glee Club sang at Y. W. meeting. 
December 15 — College Guild Bazaar. 

Y. W. party for children. 
December 16 — Belles Lettres dinner. 
December 1 7 — Carol singing. 
December 18 — Going home. 

S» 
CAMPAIGN FOR $180,000 BEGUN JANUARY, 1912, 
COMPLETED JUNE, 1913 
The endowment committee presents herewith a state- 
ment of the endowment and improvement fund campaign, 
which closed June 4 last, showing some interesting details. 

Page Thirty 



/?K-e 




tt\)t CoHegc (greetingfif 




The Trustees appreciate the great interest that so many 
friends have shown by their hearty co-operation and gen- 
erous gifts, and they thank them all personally for their 
share in this work. 

As will be seen, there has been nearly $100,000 paid 
in on the subscriptions. With this the Trustees have paid 
off every dollar of the $80,000 indebtedness, and have 
made a beginning of nearly $20,000 on the greatly need- 
ed endowment fund. Every dollar that comes in now will 
add directly to this fund. A number of the friends have 
generously paid the entire amount of their subscriptions 
without waiting until the time of deferred payments. It 
is to be hoped that many more will do this, so that the 
College can begin very soon to secure an income from its 
endowment funds. The report hereto appended will re- 
pay a little careful study. A college is rich that has more 
than twelve hundred interested friends. 

SUMMARY OF GIFTS 

Total Amount Due 
Pledged. Paid. ISrov.22,1913 

Jacksonville Pledges $69,124.25 $32,931.18 $36,193.07 

Outside of Jacksonville 64,046.90 27,370.16 36,676.74 

Alumnae Pledges 20,045.65 15,640.00 4,405,65 

Faculty, Student & Society Pledges 8,585.20 2,995.56 5,589.64 

From Miscellaneous Sources 20,440.95 20,440.95 

Grand Total $182,242.95 $99,377.85 $82,865.10 

^ jdw bflp: bp5 

HPnf^ i25^ 2;fiH ^^ 
Jacksonville Pledges 613 194 294 170 



Outside of Jacksonville 247 115 85 47 

Alumnae Pledges 150 32 78 40 

Faculty, Student and Society Pledges. 216 47 47 122 

Grand Total 1226 388 459 379 

Page Thirty-one 



Cfje CoUegc (Greetings; 



SOCIETY NOTES 
Phi Nu Banquet 

The Phi Nu Banquet, dear to the hearts of both old 
and new girls, was held at the Colonial Inn on November 
22, 1913. 

Doctor Marker and Peril Hess led the way to the din- 
ing room, where one large table was placed in the center 
of the room and small ones around at the sides. The 
menus in Phi Nu blue showed us the way to our places 
where we each found a pink rose awaiting us. After the 
banquet which quite equalled any other in deliciousness, 
Miss Hess introduced Miss Mothershead, our toast-mistress 
for the evening. She gave a short sketch of the exper- 
iences of water links Tytil and Mytil in their search for 
the Bluebird of happiness, and then called upon Miss Celia 
Cathcart, last year's Phi Nu President to respond to the 
toast as it is given in the first verse of the Phi Nu song. 
Her interpretation was broad and interesting and Miss 
Cathcart herself charming. 

Miss Mothershead introduced Irene Crum next who 
spoke on Happiness, interpreted from the second verse of 
the Phi Nu song. Her toast was bright and full of ideal- 
ism. 

Before introducing Margaret Meek, Miss Mothers- 
head went on with the tale of the Bluebird emphasizing 
strength as the children found it in the allegory. Miss 
Meek spoke of the oak leaf and its ancient symbolism for 
strength and loyalty. 

As the children in The Blubird found the little blue 
flowers of remembrance so Abbie Peavoy found them for 
us in the fourth verse of our song. Last but not least was 
Dr. Harker's toast, which was bright and reminiscent of 
other Phi Nu banquets. 

There were several guests, Miss Celia Cathcart, the 
Misses Virgin, Lillian Davis, Miss Wadsworth, Miss Anna 
Shipley, Miss Vera Kennedy and Miss Lyone Schaffer. 

Page Thirty-two 




Cftc College Greetings; 



Belles Lettres 

Tuesday evening, December the sixteenth, has been 
chosen for the date of the annual Christmas banquet to 
be held in Society Hall. Miss Louise Gates will be toast- 
mistress. Our last year's president, Miss Emily Jane 
Allen, will be present and will give a toast. 

Miss Dorothy Stevens has been elected Treasurer and 
Miss Wilma Miller, Librarian. 

Belles Lettres regrets the temporary loss of one of 
her old members, Miss Freda Fenton, who has been called 
home by the death of an uncle. 

j0 

Academea Notes 

At a meeting of the Academea on November the sev- 
enteenth, sixteen new girls pledged themselves to the 
society. The vacancies of corresponding secretary and 
critic have been filled by Josephine Knewitz and Edna 
Kesler. 

A plan has been adopted for the ensuing year to take 
up the study of the best novels and to have reports on 
them by members of the socity. 

ILLIWOCO NOTES 

The College Annual Board decided on the name 
"Illiwoco" at a recent meeting of the staff. This name 
was suggested by several girls who will receive honorable 
mention in the first volume of the "Illiwoco." 

At chapel time, Saturday, December 6th the sub- 
scription campaign was opened. Miss Ross announced 
that the price will be $1.5o. To meet incidental ex- 
penses, a payment of fifty cents will be necessary with 
each pledge. It is hoped that all students and every 
member of the faculty will subscribe to this, the first issue 
of the "Illiwoco." 

Page Thirty-three 




tS^ije College (jlreetingg 



There are a number of alumnae and former students 
of recent years who will probably be glad to see and to 
own the "Illiwoco," since it will contain pictures of their 
former class mates and society sisters, and will in many 
ways endear itself to the hearts of Woman's College girls. 

We urge that many of this year's girls write to their 
personal friends of other years, and secure pledges for 
the "Illiwoco." Please report all such pledges to the 
business managers, at once. Don't wait for someone 
else to write to other girls, but do it yourself, and "do it 
now." 

DEPARTMENT NOTES 

Miss McKay will give her recital Monday evening, 
January the nineteenth. 

Miss Beebe, Miss Widenham and Mrs. Hartmann have 
been unable to give their regular lessons for a few days on 
account of illness. 

The usual term recital of the College of Music was 
given on Monday evening, December the fifteenth. 

The Cantata, Noel was given at Grace Church, Sun- 
day evening, December the fourteenth. A number of 
College girls took part. 

Mr. Donald Swarthout gave a lecture on the organ 
to the Music History class on December twenty-third and 
took each member of the class through the chapel organ. 

The Messrs. Swarthout and families will spend the 
Christmas holidays in Paw Paw, Illinois. 

Vesper concert Sunday afternoon, December 7, 1913, 
four o'clock. Music Hall: 

Page Thirty-four 




tZQbe College ^ttttinqi 




Dethier 

Dethier 

Lux 



Pinsuti 



Gaul 



Elgar 



Organ — 
Idylle 
Aria 
Fantasie on "O Sanctissima" 

Mr. Donald M. Swarthout 

Voice — 

II Libro Santo 

(with violin obligate) 
Miss McKay 

Voice — 

Duet, "They shall hunger no more" 
(from "The Holy City") 
Miss McKay, Mrs. Hartmann 

Voice — 

Trio, "The Snow" 

(with two violins obligato) 

Miss Beebe, Miss McKay, Mrs. Hartmann 

(Obligato parts played by Mr. M. L. Swarthout and Miss 

Harrison) 
* Reading — 

"King Robert of Sicily" Longfellow 

(from "Tales of a Wayside Inn") 
Miss Parsons 

*The musical setting by Rossetter G. Cole, played by 
Mr. M. L. Swarthout, at the piano, and Mr. D. M. Swarth- 
out, at the organ. 

As Miss Beebe and Mrs. Hartmann were unable to take 
part , Miss Helen Jones substituted for Mrs. Hartmann in 
the duet, and Mr. M. L. Swarthout played a violin number 
in place of the trio. 

j& 
Home Economics 

All classes of the Home Economics Department met 
together December sixth to observe "Home Economics" 
day. Talks dealing with the development of the science 

Page Thirty-five 




W^ CoUege ^reettngs( 



m 



were given and special mention was made of Mrs, Ellen 
Richards, to whom, more than to any other one person, 
we are indebted for the wide spread adoption of House- 
hold Science and Arts as a subject of instruction in the 
public schools and colleges. 

Expression Notes 

Miss Allen favored the College and the public with a 
lecture-recital on Robert Browning, December 8. Her 
program was: 

Part I. 

Browning's View of Life. 

Part II. 

The Last Ride Together, 

Up at a Villa — down in a city. 

Andrea del Sarto, 

Miss Allen brought us the deepest thought from 
Browning in a very interesting manner, and every one 
thoroughly appreciated and enjoyed her first recital at 
LW.C. -fll 

Miss Parsons read before the Sorosis Club Friday even- 
ing, December fifth. 

Miss Frances Frazee was elected a member of the Dra- 
matic Club at Northwestern this year. This is a proof of 
Miss Frazee's success, for only those who do excellent 
work are admitted to this club. 

EXCHANGES 

To all our exchanges a Merry Christmas and a Happy 
New Year. 

At a concert. A visitor — Have you ever went to 
grand opera ? 

Seraphina — No, what is it like? 
Oh, it's where they wear long trains. 

If a kitten belong to a category, will a mouse become 
erratic ? 



Page Thirty-six 



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THE) TWENTY DEPARTMENTS in our store are 1 

just like twenty little stores, every one devoted to | 

the sale and display of articles FOR THE MoDRRN | 

Woman's wear. | 

Each Department makes a determined and successful | 

effort to show first the ATTRACTIVE NEW STYLES | 

OF THE SEASON. You'll find shopping- pleasant | 

here. . 1 



Kid Gloves 
Neckwear 
Fabric Gloves 
lyinen 

White Goods 
Notions 
Laces and 

Embroideries 



Corsets 
Art Goods 
Petticoats 
Handkerchiefs 
Ribbons 
Toilet Goods 
Jewelry and 

Leather 



Knit Underwear 
Hosiery 

Children's Wear 
Muslin Underwear 
and Waists 
Coats and Suits 
Dresses 



^. jLWAiaDie!lL.lL.m m 



LADIES* AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 




J. A. OBERMEYER 



FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

Footwear for all occasions — 
Street Shoes 

Dress Slippers 

Bed-room Slippers 

h: o IP IP IB i^ s' 

We Repair Shoes 

HARRY P. OBERMKYER 



THE COLLEGE STORE | 

Pennants, Stationery, Tennis Goods, Drug's, School | 

Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory I 

Books and Photo Albums | 

"PLEASED customers" — our MOTTO | 

Goods Delivered f 

Phones: lUinoiB 57*. Bell 457 Corner South Main St. and Square | 

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Otto Speith 
pboto iportralturc 



Our Portraits were accepted and hung at the National Convention 
in Kansas City 1913 



Formerly Watson Studio 



Southwest Corner Square 



Can a frightened calf become cowed? 
May a puppy have a dogged disposition ? 
I. C. — It's a good one for 1 wrote it. 



iGo to 



MULLENIX & HAMILTON 

For Everything Sweet 

Hot and Cold Sodas 

216 East state Street 



Coover&Shrev< 

Have a complete line of j 

Drugs, Kodaks, Perfumes, I 
Stationery and Holiday Gift 

We do Developing" & Printinj 

Eait and West Side Square 



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mMiiiiiHiiiininiiiimMMiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiHiniiiiiiiiiHiiiiiMiiniiiiiiiiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiMiiininniiiiiiHriiHiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimim 

The most dainty things in Rings and Jewelry. | 

New and handsome styles of goods in Sterling Silver | 

Highest grades of Cut Glass, and every I 

description of Spectacles and Eye Glasses | 

Fine Diamonds a Specialty | 

at I 

RUSSELL & LYON'S | 

The Oldest Established Jewelry House in Central Illinois | 

West Side Square | 

Both Phones 96 | 





All the Faculty, Students and Friends! 


!iflathis, Kamm & Shibe say 


of the College should have a Checking 
or Savings Account with 


We can furnish your 
Shoes and Party Slippers 


F. G. FARRELL & CO. 


in the popular styles, 


BANKERS 


leather-s, and 


F. E. Farrell, President 


fabrics 


E. E. Crabtree, Vice-President 
H. H. Potter, Cashier 




M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier 



Seraphina, after Expression class — Miss A. says she 
can fall down stairs without hurting herself. I'm going to 
ask her to do it for me some day. 



Concern 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



MMMmwHMiiiuiMiuiMnimimiunwiuiiiwuiiinHniuiiiiiiiiHiuiiiuiiHiiiiHiHiiniiiiimiHiitHiiiiiiHiuiiHuiiiiiiHiiMiumHUiuiiiiiuiiiiuiiuiiitiuuii^ 



iiMiiiiiiiiiiiiMiMiiimiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiMiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiiMiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiHiHiiiiiniiiiiiiiniiiHiiiiiiiinimiHiiiinMin 

I For those who discriminate 

I We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to 

I please the students who come to our city. We select only the 

I best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. 

I Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 

I Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

I Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 

I College functions. 

I Vickery 3c Merrigan 

I CATSREFtS 

I 227 West State Street 



|Both Phones 309 



I SAFEST PIvACE TO TRADE 

IfjlLLERBY'^ 

I DRY GOODS STORE 



West Side Square 



Brady Bros. 

Eiverything' in Hardware ai 
Paints 



At a thimble party. Miss McL. — Did you ever do 
that before, I mean behind ? 

On Saturday night. Miss M. — Were there many that 
went down to breakfast to-morrow morning? 



I The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . j2oo,ooo 
Surplus . . 34,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 

U. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 

Julius E. Strawn, President 
Chas. B. Graff, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orcar 

H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

J. R. Robertson 




Cloams. Sutra, FuRa/uaMajMarr 




Established 1890 

Low Prices Square Dealing 
Keep us busy 



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Coats, Suits and Skirts tailored to your individual | 

measure and form at | 

5 

POPULAR PRICES | 

A.11 work made in our own shop by expert workmen. We j 

3 

guarantee to fit you. | 

JACKSONVILLE TAILORING COMPANY 



233 East State Street 



Opposite Pacific Hotel 



Ruth Marker is such an enthusiastic Latin student that 
she calls her "hike" club her "haec" club. 

Seraphina, after visit home — Well, I'm sort of glad to 
get back here and not so very, either. 



ARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL CO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers, 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 183 

Grecnhoases, Bell 775 



McQINNIS' I 

The Young Ladies' Shoe Store | 

See the "BABY DOLL SHOE."| 
It's the Latest. | 

We carry a fall line of Bvening Slippers| 
in all colors. | 

If it's new, we have it | 

JAS. McQINNIS & OO.i 

East Side Square i 



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aiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiuiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiHniiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiuiHiiiHiiuiniiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiniiiiiiHiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiHHiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin^ 



I 



Want 

Cut flowers 



F 
E 

R 

N 



FROM S 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 



Both Phones 



I Classy styles 

|We will be pleased to show yon our line 

I FROST & NOLLEY 

I Fashionable Footwear 

I For All Occasions 

I 

I 33 Sonth Side Sq. Jacksonville, 111. 



COTRELL & LEONAR 

AI^BANY, N. Y. 

MAKBRS OP 

CAPS 

GOWNS and 
HOODS 

To the American Colleges and Univ 
sities from the Atlantic to the Pacii 
Class contracts a specialty. 




Seraphina, shopping — Have you one smaller than 
that but not quite so small ? 

Miss H. — You needn't cross the street to take that car. 
The front end will stop. 



I Dorwart Market 

i 

m 

I ALLr KINDS OF 

3 

|fRESH and SALT MEATS 
I FISH, POULTRY, Etc. 



Both phones 196 



230 W. State St. 



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KODAK FINISHING 

Vulcan Roll Films 

Cameras from $2.00 u 
Everything strictly first cla 

Vail & Vail 

Oswald's Drag Store 71 E. Side { 



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PHOTOGRAPHER 



successor to McCulloug-h Bros. 



East Side Square | 



Cameras^ Films, Papers, 


E 
1 
1 


Photo Supplies for Kodakers 
velopingf, Printing and Mounting 


S. S. Kresge Co.| 


at reasonable prices 


= 

5c & IOC Store | 


Armstrongs Drug Store 


i 

New and Up-to-Date | 


South West Corner Square 


i 
i 
1 



Miss P. — How warm it is for this kind of weather! 

Seraphina — I won't have to dress up to-night, for it is 
going to be an infernal party. 



Ask your grocer for 

HOLSUM 

BRE)AD 

[ade Clean. Delivered clean 
in waxed paper wrappers 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Art Needle Work 
and Millinery 

211 West state Street 



llnillllllllHIIiniHIIIIUIIIHIHIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIHIIHMIIHIIIIIIIIIMIIHIIIIIIHIIIIIinilHIIIIMIIIIIIIMIinHIMIIIIIHIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIII^ 



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I INTEC3F?|-rV 

iWe have btiilt op oui* GROCERY and DRUG Departments on a sa 

koundation of INTEGRITY. In our GROCERY and DRUGS ^ 

|SAY WHAT WE BELIEVE, and our customers BELIEVE WHi* 

IWE SAY. Every item in oor store is an example of PURE FOG 

iCLEAN FOOD, GOOD FOOD and BEST DRUGS* 

{ours is a GROCERY AND DRUG STORE with a CONSCIENC 

[phone. 800 I^OIBIBKyTS BI^OS. Phonei 8 

I Grocery —Pharmacy 

I 29 South Side Sq. 



|We Sell 

£ 

{Phoenix Guaranteed 

Silk Hosiery 

I Mm^ 



DRY GOODS STORE 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 41; 

A. L. Bromley 

Ladies' Tailor 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing an 
Repairing. Ladies' Man Tai! 
ored Suits to order. Remodelin 
of all kinds. Special rates t 
I. W. C. students. All wor 
called for and delivered promptl 



Miss C. — George Atherton is George Metcalf s first 
cousin. 

George, emphatically — No. 

Miss C. — ^Yes, your first cousin. 

George — No, he is my second cousin. Elizabeth 
Ann was my first cousin I ever had. 



111. Phone 57 



Bell Phone 92 



Fresh Drug's, 

Fancy Goods 
Stationery 



I Badger Druo Store 

i a doors West of Postoffice 



I 235 E. State Street 

iHnHiiiiriiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiHMiiMiiiiiiiiiMmiiMiiiiiiiMiiMMHiiiHiniiiHHiiHiiiiiiiiiiiriimmHnuiwmiiiuNiiiHHHimHiHNmmHHmNimiH^^ 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



piiiMHiiHnMiiiiiiiiiiMiHiiiiHmiiiiiMiiiiiiiHinniniiiiiiiiimiiintMiiniiiHiiiiiiiniiitiiiiiuiMiinniiiiiiiniinHiHiiHiiiiiiiiiiniiuiiniiiiiniiniiiniiimiiin 

It will pay you to visit 

SCHRAM'S 



Jewelry Store 



colle^ge: pins, rings, spoons, etc. 



Len G. Magill 
Printer 

ist state Street 111. Phone 418 



yAYLORJ 



Grocery 

A g-ood place to trade 

221 West State Street 



L. I, — Yes, we sing Christmas carols at the Blind and 
the Old People's Home. 

Do you ever go out to the Deaf and Dumb school? 
L. I. — I can't remember, but we surely have. 



Montgomery & Deppe | 

T THEIR NEW PLACE ON THE WEST SIDE OF I 

THE SQUARE ARE SHOWING | 

EVERYTHING IN | 

X 

Dry Goods and Ready-to-Wear Garments | 

I 

Telephone for the Fall Catalogue | 



IHH4IHHimtm«HH««IHHHIM«nHmmHHIIUIHNHIHIHIHimmniHHIIHIHHHIIMimHIUmHttMninillllllinH«nilllHIIIIIIIIIIHIIHIHIMIMHIIIHfllllllltllllllllHIH^ 



giiiiiii iiMiiiiniinMiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiMiHiiiiiiiiniiiiiiHiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiniiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiimimiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiw^ 

I College Jewel rv 

j Engraved Cards and Invitations 

I Chafing Dishes, Copper and Brass Goods 

I Special Die Stationer/ 

s 

E 

I 21 South Side Square 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 



HERE TO PLEASE 



I Candies 

I Cookies 

I Sandwiches 

I Groceries 



Cakes 

Pies 

Pop on Ice 

California Fruits 



School Supplies 




Jacktonville's foremost Men's Sto 

Mackinaw and Sweater Co 

Mannish Cut and Form Pitting 

Hand Bag's, Suit Cases at 
Trunks 

I. W. C. Banners and Pillc 

SPECIAL DESIGNS ON REQUE 



M. K. — Girls, 1 am losing weight! I can see now 



when I laugh! 



iLadies' Late Style Sweater 
I Coats 



Are Sold by 



pFrank Byrns 



Hat 

Store 



C. S. MARTir 

Wall Paper, Paintinc 

and Interior Decorating" 

Pictures and Frames 

314 W. State St., Scott Block 
Jacksonville, 111. 



?IHinilMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMinilMinilMnininilllllinillllllllllllllllllllMllllllllllllltlllllllMllllllllllllllllinillllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHMIIIHNHIHIUIHIMIHIinillllUMIIHI 



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lafe 



Confectionary 



Ipcacock Inn 



Jatering 



Soda 



Candies 



SKIRT BOXES 
I^OCKERS. SCREENS, 

DESKS AND 
ED ROOM CURTAINS 

AT 

nson, Hackett & Guthrie 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



Miss M. (in psychology) — Now if you have some kit- 
tens where would you put them ? 

(No answer.) 

Why, you know, you would put them in a category — 
a category. 



SHEET MUSIC, MUSIC MERCHANDISE 

TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 

AND SUPPLIES 



19 SOUTH SIDB PUBLIC SQUARB I 

MWIUMHHimiWIHIIUIIIiniHIHIIIIIIUIIIIIIMIIUniUIUIUIUIiniimHIIIIIIIIUIIIUIIIUIWIUIUIUNIIIIIIIUIIIIItUIIUIIIUmMlimillUIIIIIIIIMIIHIIUIWIIUIIHIU^^ 



|iMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiniiiiiiiiiMiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiw^ 

I J. BART JOHNSON 

I Everything Musical 

I PIANOS, PLAYER PIANOS, VICTROLAS, 

I IMPORTE)R OF VIOLINS, AND A COMPLETE \ 
I LINE OF MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 



I 49 South Side Square 



I Dr. Albyn Lincoln Adams 

X 

I Oculist and Anrist 

I to the State School for the Blind 

I 323 West State Street 



I Practice limited to diseases of the 
I Bye, Ear, Nose and Throat 



Both Telephones 



DR. ALPHA B. APPLEBE 
Dentist 

336 West State St. 



At the Annual office. L. McC. — Here is the material 
for the Sophomore class. 

The editor, glaring at Lucile — Sophomore in Acad- 
emy, are you ? 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 
Jno. B. Snell, Prop, 
Rates $2.25, (2.50, and $3.00 per da 
One Block West of Woman's CoUeg 
Opposite Post Office 
Rooms with or without bath 
l/ocal and Long Distance Telephor 

in every room. 

^iiiimniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiuuiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiuiiiiuiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiuniiuiiiiiiiniiiiniiHiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



I DR. BYRON S. GAILEY 

i 

s 

I BYE, EAR, 

I NOSE AND THROAT 



Office and Residence 
340 West State Street 



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Andre & Andre | 

Eyverything" in | 

High Grade House Furnishing| 

for Everybody, E^verywhere i 

46-50 North Side Square = 





E. A. SCHOE^DSACK 




CAFE BATZ 

And Annex for Ladies 

J21-223 East State Street 


Proprietor of 

City Sti:am Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 




lois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 


230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111. 






Illinois Phone 388 





R. R. (at Public Library) — I want something on 
Cromwell. 

Librarian — Biography ? 

R. R. — I cion't care who it's by. 



Florence Kirk King 
Hair Dresser 

>ecial Service in Shampooing 
:alp Treatment, Manufacturing 
air into I^atest Styles 
Work done by appointment 
. Phone 837 503 W. College St. 

MNMHItmiHHIHIUUIIUIIIiMIHtlllllHHIHHIUIMHUIUUIIIIIIHimilllUllllinH 



Cherry's Livery | 

s 
s 

Finest Light and Heavy| 

Livery | 

Lowest Rates | 

£ 

135-237, 302-304-306 North Main Stieetl 

£ 

uiiiiiiiuiiiiumiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiHiiiiiuiiiHniiiiHiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiinMMHraiHiilis 



JlilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIHMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^ 



I Girls^ Patronize our Advertiser 



Ayers National Bank 

Founded (852 



Capital 
^^200,000 

Surplus 
^50,000 




Deposits 
^1,250.000 

United Stat( 
Depository 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 

Special Window for Ladies 
Ladies' Waiting- Room 
We make a feature of Ladies' Accounts, and have 
provided facilities for their exclusive use 



I OFFICERS 

I M. P. Danlap, President O, F. Buffe, Caehier 

i Andrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashil 

I R. M. Hockenhull, Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst. Cashie* 

I C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 



Owen P. Thompson 
Edward F. Goltra 
John W. Leach 



DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhull 
M. F. Danlap 



Harrj M. Cap 
O. F. Bnffe 
Andrew Ra8t» 



■UllimilUIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIUIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIinillllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIItlllMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIinilllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIM 




Bxtenslon 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Ereoted 190D 



LINOI«! WOMAN'S COLLEGE^ 

College of Liberal Arts i 

(Full classical and scientific courses) i 

College ot Music [ 

School of Fine Arts I 

School of Expression j 

School of Home Economics [ 

4LA Standard College — one of the best. | 

Regular college and academy courses | 

leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- \ 

inently a Christian college with every j 

facility for thorough work. Located i 

in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 
dignified, old college town, noted for 
its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking for a good college. 

Call or address. Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, 111. 




iimiiNmmiHiNMmiiiiMHMMMiimuniiHiiiwumMMnimwMmM wiiihim 



®i)e College (Sreetinss 

•If The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 

€Jf Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

€|j Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
Ijl Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



Contents 

Editorials ... 3 

Poem — San Antonio 6 

Paper — The College Woman in Journalism 6 

Poem — The Sunbeam 8 

Paper— The Southern Cotton Mills 8 

I^etter — Kate Blackburn 10 

Items of Interest 12 

Class Reports 16 

Weddings 20 

Alumnae Organization 20 

Belles lyCttres Notes 21 

The lUiwoco . 21 

The College Calendar 22 

Reports on Endowment Fund 23 



The 

Graphic Arts 

Concern. 



ALUMN/E SONG 

Mrs. Alice Don Carlos Vogel, 71. Air— Webb 

As pilgrims journ'ying hither 

From every land and clime, 
To bow in willing homage 

Before our country's shrine, 
Where liberty and justice 

Shine each a peerless gem. 
That gilds with light eternal 

Columbia's diadem. 

So we to Alma Mater 

Our loyal tribute bring. 
And incense pure and fragrant. 

In radiant censers swing; 
We'll twine for every loved one. 

Alike below, above. 
With blossoms amaranthine, 

A coronal of love. 

Fond memories in each bosom. 

Like June's white lillies blow. 
The winds re-echo softly 

The songs of long ago; 
We hear the old time voices. 

That lure us back to ways 
We trod in dewy mornings 

Ot golden yesterdays. 

As flowers may bloom in beauty 

Amidst the storms of earth. 
So, oft in pain and sorrow. 

True pleasures have their birth; 
O may we all be mindful. 

Though dark and drear the way. 
The star that gems the night time 

Is herald of the day! 



ILbe(IolleQc(grectinQg 

Vol. XVII JacksoHTille, 111., February, 1914 No 5 

Faculty Committbb— Miss Mothershead, Miss Baker, Mias 

Johnston. 
Editor.— Abbie Peavoy 

AssociATB Editors— Erma Elliott, Helena Mnnson, Helen McGhec 
BusiNBSS Managers — Geneva Upp, Winifred Barmeiater, Alma 

Harmel 



As we enter the College, live in its halls, our interest 
becomes centered in girls, in faculty members, in local 
affairs. Our interest is in definite people, definite things, 
not in the way in which the College is affected by them, 
but as they affect us. Unless, when we leave the College, 
we transfer our interest in the individual to an interest in 
the College as it is affected by the girls in general, our con- 
cern and enthusiasm for I. W. C. will dwindle and dis- 
appear. 

For instance, much concern has been felt for the com- 
plaints which come to us from the former students. 
"The Greetings contains nothing of interest for us. The 
present students are unknown to us. None of the faculty 
members we know are there, the locals and sketches are 
of no interest if you don't know the people." The Greet- 
ings is an organ of the College, it represents as nearly as 
possible the life of the College, it records as well as it is 
able the progress the College is making. If the interest 
was in the College, wouldn't the Greetings help to keep 
you in connection with it? 

There is another way in which these objections may 
be removed, a way in which you may be able to keep in 
touch with the College and with each other. The Greet- 
ings will gladly set aside a space for a regular monthly 
alumna department, to be filled by your contributions, to 
be controlled by an alumna appointed by you, to collect 

Page Three 




^f)e CoQege #reettns£( 




and send in before the fifteenth of each month to the local 
editor. Let the secretaries of the classes take hold of the 
matter until the next meeting of the association in June 
and send to the Board some material for this department. 

The Greetings wishes to express its appreciation to 
Mrs. Lambert. To her we are indebted for much of the 
information of this number. 

The numbers of the Greetings for the first three 
months of this year have been sold out, but if any of you 
should care to have the June number 1913, which contains 
the close and account of our late endowment campaign, 
the Greetings will be glad to mail it to you for the regular 
price. We, have, also a limited number of complete 
volumes for the year (1909-10) — (1910-11) — (1911- 
12) — (1912-13) which will be sent at the regular price, 
^1.00. 

It has been impossible to print all of the material 
which has been sent in. We will endeavor to use it from 
time to time in the alumnae notes. Among the material 
is a story which was sent to us by Mrs. Hettie Anderson 
Wilson of '02 which, because of its length and late arrival 
we will have to lay aside to a future time. 

A good many years ago some Educators with a vision 
had a glimpse of a real Woman's College for the middle 
west, and as a result foundations for the present institu- 
tion were laid. The first years were a real struggle and 
many times the realization of the vision seemed too far 
distant to be a reality. The present administration had 
more faith and saw a much clearer picture of that college 
in the distance, than anyone had ever seen and as a result 
of the untiring energy of our beloved Dr. Harker, we have 
today the best Woman's College in the middle west. 

It is comparatively easy when we return at Commence- 
ment time and attend class reunions and alumnae meet- 

. Page . Four 



Cfje CoUege ^reetinstf 




ings to develop some enthusiasm, but to keep this interest 
throughout the year seems to be another matter. What 
per cent of the alumnae keep in touch with the college 
through "TheGreetings? " I fear we would not be proud 
to see that subscription list. Yet, "The Greetings," as a 
college paper has grown in every way in spite of our lack 
of support. With our support what might the Editorial 
Staff do? The publication of a special alumnae number 
is a compliment which we should appreciate. 

The present student body seems more capable of 
arousing college spirit than we ever did. Our interest and 
support should now come in another direction. Few of us 
realize to what an extent we may influence the future 
growth of the college. There is a certain community, a 
particular circle of people, where our personal ideas and 
opinions, regarding the Woman's College will have more 
influence than any one elses. We can all do much in the 
matter of influencing students to investigate the college 
and compare it with other schools. One by one this will 
add students to the enrollment. 

We can see many steps of advancement in the college 
organizations. The tendency to get away from the more 
narrow, exacting, boarding school life, and have in its 
place broader college principles does more to increase and 
to keep the student body together than any other one 
thing. The student council, steps towards student gov- 
ernment and the college annual, indicate a move in the 
right direction. 

The organization of I. W. C. societies with headquar- 
ters in many of the largest cities has done much to keep 
interest stimulated among us and it also gives all former 
students a chance to combine their interest with ours. 

It is only with the closest co-operation that we may 
hope to accomplish anything worth while. If each of us 
does her part, I. W. C. can become one of the leading 
colleges of the country. 

Susan Rebhan, 'o5. 

Page Five 




ttf^t College ^Ireettngtf 




SAN ANTONIO 

Antonio, bold and bleak and white, 

With many a snow, so soft and light. 

And glistening in the radiant, bright 

And glorious southern sun. 

How oft I've watched the afterglow, 

Those opal lights, that come and go 

Upon thy bosom, white with snow. 

When day is done. 

Ah, well I love thy lofty crest, 

The stunted pines that hug thy breast. 

As if to find some peace and rest, 

From winter's icy blast. 

The sun that shone so gloriously, 

Has slipped and fallen in the sea. 

And stars keep silent watch o'er thee 

For night has come at last. 

Phebe Kreider Murray, '90. 

THE COLLEGE WOMAN IN JOURNALISM 

The ambition to write lurks in the hearts of a large 
number of college women. Occasionally the ambition 
is so strong that it emerges from its secluded corner and, 
expressing itself in neatly written pages, journeys to mag- 
azine and newspaper editors. There it meets with vary- 
ing degrees of success and failure and, according to the 
powers of perseverance of the literary aspirant, it lives 
triumphant or returns, sick with discouragement, to the 
secluded corner from which it came. 

The greatest drawback to the success of the average 
literary aspirant is her entirely unpractical view of the 
business of literature. She is apt to regard literature as 
a profession built up by genius and inspiration. She fails 
to realize that literature is a business dependent on the 
same principles that govern every line of money making 
work. 

Page Six 




SDfje College (grectmsg 




The young woman who wishes to write should go 
about her work just as if it were any other business. The 
girl who intends to teach or to do concert or lecture work 
expects to toil many hours a day every day. She studies 
the methods and results of the men and women who are 
succeeding in her line of work. And she does not expect 
to become, immediately upon beginning her work, the 
peer of these same successful men and women. 

The literary aspirant usually plans to work by inspira- 
tion or in the romantic flicker of the midnight oil, writing 
high grade stories that will be promptly accepted by the 
big magazines or declined on account of the stupidity of 
the editors. She has no realization of the long appren- 
ticeship that must be served before her work is worth 
while. 

The business of writing means to write several hours 
a day and keep everlastingly at it; to study the methods 
of the men and women whose work is filling the magazines 
and newspapers; to learn every thing there is to be learned 
about the craft; to serve a probation period of rejection 
and disappointment. 

Fiction and journalism are so closely related that it 
is impossible to differentiate between them. The same 
principles govern both. Fiction requires, necessarily, a 
longer probation before it brings a secure income. Jour- 
nalism must also be learned through hard work and many 
disapppointments. But the newspaper writer is paid the 
day she begins her work. 

There are greater opportunities in journalism for 
women today than there have ever been. During the last 
few years women's organizations have become important 
factors in the Avorld's civic and industrial affairs. 
Women's interests must be written of by women. The 
projects undertaken by women today are dignified and 
successful and editors demand that they shall be so pre- 
sented to readers as to reflect their true spirit. The 
women who write them must be well educated women. 

Page Seven 



tICtje CoUesE Greetings! 




They must have dignity, poise and an all around mental 
development. The day of the flippant society tattler 
and the Bohemian "sob sister" is past. The well bred 
college woman is the journalist of today. 

The financial returns of fiction and journalism are 
better than in almost every woman's occupation. The 
checks for the beginner's accepted stories are small and 
the salary of a new reporter on a newspaper is not large. 
But as experience and reputation are acquired the scrib- 
bler's checks and salary increase and an income of several 
thousand dollars a year is practically assured the successful 
vv'oman journalist. Annie Hinrichsen, '97. 

><» 
THE SUNBEAM 

A beam shone down in a green,. green glade 
From far in the sky to the grass it came 
Through leaves that danced and shadows made 
No two at once or ever the same. 
He shone, he twinkled, he waltzed in shade 
With flowers for partners, this gay young beam; 
He kissed each one in the part he played 
And left with no twinge on his part did seem. 
Each blossom he'd touched would drop her head 
When she saw her neighbor as rival led 
Then as all were tasted, he took his flight; 
The flowers crept under quite out of sight. 

Ann Marshall, '13. 



THE SOUTHERN COTTON MILL 

When one enters a Cotton Mill settlement, perhaps 
the first thought that flashes across the mind is that much 
of the printed matter on the subject has too much local 
color. It is the exceptional mill where one finds the 
comforts for these narrowed lives. The conditions in 
the average mill of the south are too little known. 

Usually from the exterior these mills are not so un- 
attractive, and the awakening comes at the sight of the 

Page Eight 



^f)t College ^reetingiS 




haunted faces of the mill hands. After spending an hour 
going- through the various departments of labor, following 
the cotton as it goes through all its metamorphoses, hold- 
ing your head because the noise is nearly unbearable, 
coughing in sympathy with your less fortunate sister, 
ever watchful lest your clothes are caught in the unpro- 
tected machinery, you do not wonder at the expression of 
absolute dejection on all the faces. There are women, 
now grown old, who have been under the same roof for 
twelve hours every day since childhood; girls whose nim- 
ble fingers are ever active, but with minds yet asleep ;am- 
bitionless young men, pitiful creatures of fate; and often 
even children, early stolen from the cradle to help earn a 
miserable support for a larger family. 

Many of the southern cotton mills are owned by north- 
ern men who give no thought to the employes as long 
as the overseer properly manages the finances. His visits 
to the mill are few, and he does not know, or care to know 
the people who are employed. The overseer has just 
enough education to want to show his lordship over the 
mill hands; so their treatment is often very harsh. 

The tiresome length of the working hours from six 
to six, in an unsanitary mill, is not lessened by the help of 
a reasonable salary. The hands are paid not by hours 
but by the amount of work accomplished. Girls who 
begin work at eight or ten years of age, can often become 
so skillful with their fingers that they can earn as much 
as a dollar and a half a day. 

But if they can earn after ten years experience, a dollar 
and a half a day, of what worth is it to them ? Where do 
we find these girls after mill hours? Crowded back of 
the mills are the houses of the mill people, filthy, wretched 
two-roomed frame buildings, overcrowded with dirty-faced 
children. One may read volumes concerning these peo- 
ple, but not until you have gone inside these so-styled 
homes, and have seen the ignorance in all its worst forms, 
can you realize how the people in that little world live. 

Page Nine 



^fte CoUege (Hreetmsss 




Here and there, a house conspicuous by its cleanliness, 
greets the eye; yonder is a group of girls neatly dressed, 
v/ith a gleam of hope taking the place of the abject 
despair. What is the reason for such a change? It is 
then that we see the evidences of years and years of work 
done by the settlement workers. Often in spite of the 
opposition of the mill overseer, she gives her life that 
these people may have a glimpse, if only a peep into a 
world of higher ideals. In some mill districts, night 
schools have been organized for the young men and 
v.'omen, kindergartens and playgrounds for the children, 
and helpful meetings for the mothers, all through the un- 
selfish love of some settlement worker. 

In some cities, which may boast of mill owners with 
hearts, the mill conditions are as good as could be ex- 
pected; libraries, playgrounds, kindergartens, mother's 
meetings, schools, hospitals, improved housing conditions, 
all being under the direct supervision of the mill owners. 
These are unusual mills. 

The solution of this present mill problem will not 
come until the mill people are given some chance for an 
education, and it can not be an open door to all under 
the present conditions. When the sanitary conditions 
are bettered, the hours of labor shortened and the salary 
raised, then can we begin to look for the mill improve- 
ment. Helen Moore, '13 

Essays, stories, poems, etc., must be left for more 
gifted alumnae, but experiences, why, yes, we have ex- 
periences, even in this far corner of the Balkan States. 

Some are amusing, others pathetic and during the past 
year, war, earthquake and pestilence have made them 
mostly tragic. 

Lovetch, nestled in the Balkan foothills, shared in the 
e:citement of mobilization week in September 1912, but 
daring the war with Turkey, the "first war" as it is called 
was spared many of the horrors witnessed by larger and 

Page Ten 



Cfte Cottcgc (greetingi 




more central cities. Turkish prisoners of war were not 
quartered here, hence no Asiatic Typhus, which swept off 
such numbers in other parts. The earthquake in June 
was only a "shock" in Lovetch and spent its force in 
Tirnovo, fifty miles distant. Then came the "second" 
and more awful war between the allied armies. Lovetch 
was occupied during the Roumanian invasion. The 
Roumanian flag was hoisted over the city but the Stars 
and Stripes waved over our mission property and we were 
unharmed and unmolested. Yet the weary weeks dragged 
by, with no mail, no telegraph, no telephone, no com- 
munication with anywhere. A special interview with the 
Roumanian Commandant in charge of the garrison gave 
no satisfactory idea as to how long such conditions would 
continue or as to what would come next. However, the 
next phase was cholera. War had taken the men, cholera 
mowed down the women like grass. Peace was declared 
and the brave Bulgarian soldiers returned in small groups, 
not to a triumphal welcome such as they deserved but to 
silently wend their way to stricken, sorrowing homes, 
many of them bereft now of wife or mother. 

A brave and desperate fight and cholera was banished. 
Then a wave of typhoid swept the country and Lovetch 
is among the stricken cities. 

On October l5th, we opened our school with fear 
and trembling, yet grateful, deeply grateful, that under 
such unusual circumstances it had been possible to gather 
forty-three boarding students into our school home. 

Never has Providence been more manifest nof God's 
care more tender than during these months of uncertainty 
and trial. Never were we, two missionaries, lone women, 
though we be, more ready to follow the Master's leading 
and do all in our power for these suffering and (in many 
ways) deeply wronged people. There is always abundant 
compensation for every deprivation in the service of our 
Heavenly King. 

Kate B. Blackburn, '83 

Page Eleven 




tS^tie CoOtge ^reetingst 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 

The work and worth of an educational institution is 
reflected in the character, the impetus, the efficiency it 
develops in the lives of those who receive its instructions; 
those who pass through its gates of entrance and exit 
having experienced the discipline of its gymnasia, the 
molding influence of its associations, the inspiration of its 
atmosphere and its ideals. 

With this standard in mind it has been most gratifying 
to note in the communities where they are found the 
place held by the alumnae of Illinois Woman's College. 

In the extended journeys made by the president of 
the alumnae association during the past year, visiting 
former students and attending the annual meetings of the 
I. W. C. societies in St. Louis, in Springfield, Decatur, 
Kansas City, Los Angeles and Chicago, opportunity was 
afforded for observation in this matter and it is a source 
of sincere pleasure to know that I. W. C. daughters have 
gone fourth imbued with the spirit of service, and are 
among the leaders in the activities of organized church, 
civic and social life in their communities. 

By way of illustration, a few hours, between trains, 
were spent one day in Vandalia. The people met in- 
cluuded the pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church. In 
remarking upon the fine character of the young women 
returned to his parish from their study in Illinois Woman's 
College he said, "Some of them had not been interested 
in the church services when they left home, but they came 
back to us ready to be helpful in any way." 

Some months later a few hours were spent in Santa 
Barbara, California. We had the names of only two 
former students of I. W. C, but we found that one of them 
Mrs. Frank Kellogg, is president of the W. C. T. U., the 
other, Mrs. Winfield Metcalf is regent of the D. A. R., and 
that reminded me that in the last election of officers in 
James Caldwell Chapter of D. A. R. in Jacksonville five 
of the seven ladies elected were I. W. C. alumnae. The 

Page Twelve 




Q^ CoOege 6reetingf 



m 



recently elected regent of the state D. A. R, organization 
in South Carolina is the brilliant toastmistress of our last 
alumnae reunion, Mrs, F, H, H. Calhoun of the I. W. C. 
class of 1895. 

The interest manifest in the work undertaken by the 
church societies is almost universal. Presidents, secre- 
taries, treasurers of Home and Foreign Missionary and Aid 
societies are natural goals for I. W. C. daughters. Among 
those who are in the foreign field is Mary Melton, '91, in 
Nagasaki, Japan; Kate Blackburn '83 is in Lo vetch, Bul- 
garia where she has charge of a school for girls and with 
her Ella G. Blackburn '02 a sister who assists in teaching; 
Emma Mitchell '82, has been for twenty-five years in 
China. In San Francisco, Mrs, Charles Perkins '75 is sec- 
retary of Japanese and Korean work on the Pacific coast 
and in Hawaii. Her duties in the educational rescue and 
religious work among these people take her up and down 
the coast to Honolulu. The W. H. M. S. has no more de- 
voted, enthusiastic, and capable worker. In Des Moines, 
Iowa, Mrs. Anna Woodcock class of '76 is associated with 
her husband in the management of the Deaconess Home 
and Training school and also is secretary of the bureau 
for the children's work in the W. H. M. S. Olive Dunlap 
'88, is a field worker and organizer in the W. H. M. S. of 
the M. E. church. Many are the parsonage homes where 
alumnae of our college are sharing in the labors of the 
parish, so that the members of annual conferences of Illi- 
nois often exchange pleasantries over the number of I. W. 
C.'s who have entered the ministry and advise the bachelor 
clergy to seek admittance to the Woman's College in their 
quest for a help mate. 

In Springfield, Illinois, a notable example of living up 
to the highest efficiency of Christian education is found 
in Mrs. B. M. Griffith, a graduate of the first class, 1852. 
During the past fifty years, Mrs. Griffith in association 
with her husband has been one of the leaders in the church 
and literary circles of the Capital City. She yet has fre- 

Page Thirteen 




Kfit CoUes^ Greetings: 



quent place on the club or church society programs, and 
for twenty-five years was secretary of the W. F. M. S. of 
the Springfield Presbytery. 

Undoubtedly the most widely known of our I. W. C. 
alumnae is Mrs. B. T. Vincent of Denver. She graduated 
in the class of 1855. As teacher, pastor's wife, member 
of the national board of the Y. W. C. A. and identified 
with all woman's organizations of the M. E, church, Mrs 
Vincent in her years of service in both east and west has 
left a deep imprint of her fine and lovable personality. 
For thirty-seven consecutive summers Mrs, Vincent has 
attended the New York Chautauqua assembly. She has 
conducted classes for primary teachers, classes in Chris- 
tian ethics for young ladies, and for eighteen years has 
presided over the daily sessions of the Chautauqua 
Woman's Club. In many ways she and her husband have 
been able coadjutors to their distinguished brother, Bishop 
John H. Vincent. 

The call of the W. C. T. U. under the leadership of 
Frances Willard met with instant response from the hearts 
of the Alumnae of the Woman's College. Mrs. Sophia 
Naylor Grubb of the class of '52 was an active organizer 
in St. Louis and Missouri. Mrs. Mary Shepherd Kuhl, 
class of '67 was for some years president of the Illinois 
W. C. T. U. She is now National Chairman of Evangelis- 
tic work. Mrs. Ellen Yates Orr is another of the same 
class who became an active white ribboner in state and 
county organizations. This is only a hint of the long list 
that might be made. 

In the first primary meeting in California to which 
women as voters were admitted there was some uneasiness 
felt as to what course would be taken by the new element 
thus introduced. The Los Angeles papers in their reports 
of the meeting spoke of it as the most quietly purposeful 
convention on record and commended the womanly dig- 
nity and intelligence of the new participants, and closed 
the report by saying that the speech that was clearly the hit 

Page Fourteen 



n — f~n 



of the day because of its insight and concise statement, its 
tright expression, was made by Mrs. Lulu WilHams 
Chapin. Mrs. Chapin is an alumna of 1876. 

The first open door of opportunity for the majority of 
yDung" women completing a school course is the school 
room, and naturally a large proportion of I. W. C. grad- 
lates enter this field of public service. They are at work 
ii the grades, in the high schools in the special courses of 
nusic and home economics and as supervisors of drawing, 
ii the colleges and special schools. For the majority 
tiis is a brief experience of a few years, but there are 
S)me who have continued teaching as a life long vocation. 
h the class of twenty-eight young ladies who graduated 
list June from the special schools and the college, eighteen 
lave accepted positions as teachers for the year 1913- 
914. Even so there were requests for still others which 
(ould not be supplied. 

Among the alumnae who are writers of books, 
iketches, poems, short stories and occasional articles are 
Vlrs. Tempe Short Perley, whose story of pioneer life in 
■'From Timber to Town" is her best known production. 
Mrs. Martha Capps Oliver has a permanent place with 
eastern and London publishing companies. Her verses 
are found on Xmas, New Year's and Easter cards and she 
also has several volumes of her longer poems. Miss Delia 
Dimmitt '86 is getting wider recognition every year be- 
cause of her charming short stories which are found in 
church papers and magazines. The short stories by Annie 
Hinrichsen '97 and Mrs. Grace Ward Calhoun '95 often 
find a place in the best magazines. The writer of the 
favorite L W. C. song is Mrs. Phebe Kreider Murray 1890. 

The presidency of a state federation of woman's clubs 
is an all absorbing task. The Nebraska federation con- 
gratulates itself, and is to be congratulated, that Mrs. 
Thomas Gist, L W. C. '84 has consented to give a second 
term in its service, a position she fills with rare tact and 
judgment. 

Page Fifteen 



Clje CoUcgc (Greetings 



^ 



1 



CLASS REPORTS / 

'62. Mrs. Marietta Carson Overmire writes from Min- 
neapolis of her meeting with her classmate, Mrs. Rachiel 
Tomlin Rankin, in Portland, Oregon, last year. 

'62. Rachel Tomlin Rankin besides being an acti^^e 
worker in the church for sixteen years was a member of 
the board of managers of the "Florence Critenden Rescae 
Home for Girls," in Portland, Oregon. 

'62. Miss Lida E. Akers is living in Kansas City, Mo., 
and attended the commencement at I. W. C. last June. 

Mrs. Martha Capps Oliver is living in Jacksonvile, 
but the other members of her class are scattered through 
the west. Mrs. Lauretta Colby Dodds in Burlington, Mc ; 
Mrs. Cornelia James Hawk in Ocheltree, Kas. ; Miss Eve- 
line G. Shirly in Kansas City, Mo., and Mrs. Carrie Tomln 
McClurg in Wichita, Kas. 

'54. When I first attended the Illinois Womaris 
College it was held in the basement of the M. E. church 
on State street. Professor Cummings of the Lebanoi 
College was the President. There in that basement ws 
planted the firm foundation of the Woman's College (f 
today. We were imbued with college spirit. We wen 
eager for success in our work. When we moved inti 
the new college building, which burned some years later 
our joys knew no bounds, we were so proud of the succes. 
the college was making. i 

After I graduated in an English course in 1854, 1 
taught two years before I was married to Mr. C. G. 
Harrison, who was in the firm of Harrison Milling Com^ 
pany at Belleville, Illinois. When later my health failed,! 
and I was allotted but a short time to live, we came by an 
ocean voyage to California in 1864, where I soon regainedl 
my health. I am still in good health, in this glorious 
climate of Pasadena. 

Wishing my Alma Mater continued success and pros- 
perity in the future is the prayer of 

Sarah J. Spruance Harrison, '54. 

Page Sixteen 



tS^t CoEese ^rtttinqi 




Frances DeMotte Archibald. After thirty-nine years 
of teaching, which she began in 1874 at the Blind institu- 
tion, she was married in 1 887, and is now living at Colum- 
bia, Isle of Pines, West Indies. 

I do thank you so much for the pictures of the dear 
old college. "They did awaken pleasant memories." I 
was a student there in 1859-60, over fifty years ago. It 
was during the presidency of Dr. Charles Adams. I left 
school, June i860 and was not in Jacksonville again 
until a few years ago. The Woman's College entertained 
the delegates of the D. A. R.. The meeting was delight- 
ful, but I did not see a single familar face. Everything 
had grown so much. The grounds of the old college 
seemed the same, but all of the old places were changed. 
The city did not seem the same place. 

Josephine A. Parr, Ottawa, 111. 

'66. Mrs. Esther M. Lofton Davidson sends these 
lines. 
And to the class of '66 

Each held in memory dear 
And circled round with halos bright 

Born of that mystic year 
We greet you each though near and far 

And hold each memory bright 
Like some sweet dream of summer time 

That haunts a winter's night. 

'64. Miss Mary Pegram, Lincoln, 111., taught math- 
ematics at I. W. C. for many years and for a short time 
was preceptress. Later she was ordained as a deaconess 
in the M. E. church. Failing health made it impossible 
for her to continue this work and she now lives in retire- 
ment at the Deaconess Hospital in Lincoln. 111. 

'67. Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Shepherd Kuhl, is now 
National Superintendent of Evangelistic work. She was 
ordained to preach in the Wesleyan Methodist church in 
1902. Her work has been over much of the country. 

Page Seventeen 



^f)t CoUese ^xtttinQi 




She has lectured, organized, written many leaflets, and 
issued a little book called the "Women of the Bible." 

'70. Mrs. Sarah Jum.per Meacham of Lyons, Kan- 
sas, writes of her pleasure in learning that Jacksonville 
"went dry" this fall by the woman's vote. Mrs. Meacham 
is a prominent worker in the W. C. T. U. 

'71. Mrs. Ellen DeMotte Brown and her family 
have returned from Citronelle, Ala., to make their home 
in Jacksonville. 

'81. Mrs. Mattie Mayfield Hulse writes from Carlin- 
ville, 111., "I have never ceased caring for this college and 
all the circumstances that pertain to its permanence and 
prosperity." Mrs. Hulse is a writer of graceful verses. 

'78, Mrs. May Humphrey Painter sends greetings 
from__ Los Angeles, "This garden spot of God's earth, 
where roses bloom all the year round." Her daughter 
Eleanor Painter is singing in opera in Berlin. 

'81. Mrs. Lillie Griffith Fawcett has removed from 
Seattle to Springfield, 111. She writes of Seattle as "a 
place of grand opportunity and service." 

'91. Mrs. Mabel Seaman Wilder writes of the class 
of '91 and their class letter, which "has never failed to 
make the trip from New York to California, from Florida 
to Washington, and from Michigan to Japan." The only 
broken lines have been caused by the death of Helen 
Duncan in 1900 and Ninetta Layton in 1913. Sadie 
Corrington has continued her musical studies at L W. C. 
Clara F. Hoover is in Chicago employed by the Woman's 
Club. Mary Melton is in the M. E. Mission at Nagasaki. 
Seven of the class are married and most of the seven are 
mothers. 

'92. Miss Etna Nichols Styan sends an interesting 
letter from Champaign. Illinois. Mrs. Ruth Schlesinger 
is living in San Francisco. Mrs. Blanche Buxton Hunt 
is living in Olathe, Kansas. 

Page Eighteen 




t^tc CoUege ^Irectings! 




'95. Mrs, Grace Buxton Brown is living in Spring- 
field, Illinois. 

'06. "I am sorry that I have nothing of special 
interest about myself to tell either the register committee 
of the Greetings Board. The above letter head (Rose- 
ville Public Schools) tells practically the whole story. 
I am sim.ply one of a band of busy school marms." 

Mary Greta Coe, '06 

'06. Maude Stevens is a sucesful child impersonator 
and is at the head of her own concert company. 

'12. Mayme Allison is continuing her work at I. W. 
C. for her B. S. Louise Gates is teaching in the Jack- 
sonville schools. May Heflin is travelling abroad with 
her mother and sister. Ethel Rose is teaching in Virginia, 
Illinois. Jeanette Taylor is studying in Chicago. Mary 
Watson is assistant in Home Economics at I. W. C. and 
will take her B. S. with the class of 1914. Mayme 
Severns is teaching at Sedalia, Missouri. 

'11. Edna Foucht is studying with Mr. and Mrs. 
Stead at Peoria. Jessie Kennedy is teaching at Waverly. 
Louise Miller is studying with Frederick Root in Chicago. 
Mrs. Rachel Mink Dunham is living at New Salem, Illi- 
nois. Nina Wagner Sherman entertained Miss Anderson 
and Rachel Morris at her home in Kansas City during the 
Student Volunteer's Convention in the holidays. 

'09. Mary Elizabeth Metcalf was married to Mr. K. 
Taliaferro Smith, January 1, 1914, at Greenfield, Illinois. 

'12. Annette Rearick was married to Mr. Harry 
Joseph Lohman, December 3, 1913, at Ashland, Illinois. 

'13. Emily Jane Allen was married to Mr. William 
Fay of Jacksonville, December 28, 1913, at Winchester, 
Illinois. 

'13. Florence Taggart is teaching cookery and sew- 
ing in the high school at Nappanee, Indiana. 

'13. Lois Coultas — "Experiences of a graduate 
student? They don't have any. They don't have time." 

Page Nineteen 




tS^ CoUese (^reettnss; 



WEDDINGS 

Georgia Henibrough was married to Mr. William 
Cliauncey Carter, December 4, 1913 at Jacksonville, 
Illinois. 

Miss Mabel Austin was married to Mr, Horace Buck- 
ley in Wilmington, Ohio, December 23. Mr. and Mrs. 
Buckley will live in Elgin, Illinois. Miss Austin took 
charge of the German department at 1. W. C. during Miss 
Cowgill's absence in the years 1906-8, and during that 
time was the officer of the '09 class. 

ALUMNAE ORGANIZATIONS 

Springfield — The officers of the Illinois Woman's Col- 
lege Society of Springfield are Mrs. A. R. Trapp, presi- 
dent ;Mrs. B. M. Griffith, honorary vice-president; Mrs. 
T. J, Underwood, Mrs. Richard Yates, Mrs. Charles Pat- 
ton, vice presidents; Miss Lenora Eads, secretary; Miss Mil- 
dred Stahl, treasurer. 

Danville — The officers of the Danville I, W. C. So- 
ciety are, Mrs. Charles Troup, president; Mrs. Edna 
Starkey Crist, secretary-treasurer. The secretary will 
keep in touch with the college and the college paper and 
will endeavor to keep members informed regarding im- 
portant events in the college and in the lives of the mem- 
bers. 

Decatur — The officers of the Decatur Society are, 
Mrs. Edith Starr Haines, president, and Mrs. C. Martin 
Wood, secretary-treasurer. 

Chicago — The officers of the Chicago Society are, 
Mrs. E. C. Frady, president; Mrs. Charles Adams, first 
vice-president; Mrs. A. M. Smith, second vice-president; 
Mrs, John R, Thompson, third vice-president ;Miss Clara 
Allen, secretary; Miss Clara Black, treasurer. Among 
the founders of the society is Mrs. Mary Ashley Deneen, 
mother of ex-Gov. Deneen, 

Jacksonville — The officers of the I. W. C, guild are, 

Page Twenty 



I 




^f)t CoQege SxtttitiQi 




Mrs, E. C. Carpenter, president; Mrs, O. F, Buffe, vice- 
president; Janette Powell, secretary; Mrs. Carrie Phillips, 
treasurer. The guild gave a very successful market and 
bazaar before the Christmas holidays. A neat sum was 
netted for the College Library Fund. 

Kansas City, Mo. — The officers of the I. W. C. So- 
ciety are, Mrs. John C. Merine, president; Mrs. John Pun- 
ton, Mrs. John J. Green, Mrs. Harry G. Moore, Mrs. L. L. 
Staley, vice-presidents; Miss Sarah E. Triplett, secretary- 
treasurer, 

St. Louis, Mo. — The officers are y\melia Postel, presi- 
dent; secretary-treasurer, Elsie Fackt. 

Los Angeles— Mrs. Phebe Kreider Murray, secretary, 
reports a very interesting meeting of the I. W. C. Society 
December thirteenth. Nearly thirty were present. The 
principal speaker was Miss Martha Weaver, The presi- 
dent of this society is Mrs. Hugh Harrison. 



BELLES LETTRES NOTES 

Tuesday afternoon, January twentieth, Belles Lettres 
held a reception for her old members in Belles Lettres 
hall. A very enjoyable program was given, consisting 
of a song by the quartet, a reading by Miss Esse Summers 
and talks by several of the guests. These proved espe- 
cially interesting as they gave the work of the society 
during the college days of these members. Among those 
who spoke were Mrs. Gates, Mrs, Blackburn, Mrs. Brown, 
Miss Gates and others. We regret that Mrs. Griffith of 
Springfield, one of our two charter members nov/ living, 
was not able to be present. After the program an informal 
reception was held and light refreshments were served. 



THE ILLIWOCO 

The Alumnae will of course be interested in the an- 
nouncement that this year an annual will be published for 

Page Twenty- one 



tEiit CoUegc ^reetmgsf 



the first time. The name selected is "Illiwoco," that be- 
ing a combination of the first syllables of our college 
name. 

The Illiwoco will be issued in May, at $1.50 per copy. 
It will be representative of all school activities, both Acad- 
emy and College, and will be full of news of both present 
and former students. There will be snapshots of some of 
the children of alumnae that we are sure will be of interest. 

Those desiring to subscribe will please send in their 
names at once to either of the business managers, Miss 
Josephine Ross or Miss Winifred Burmeister, Woman's 
College. 

By the Illiwoco Staff. 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 

-School opens after Christmas recess. 

-Girls still returning — a few missed trains in 

Chicago. 
-All Juniors attend chapel. 
-Last chance to subscribe for Illiwoco. They 
will probably take your fifty cents though, 
if you go right away. 
Jan. 10 — Miss Anderson entertains the Y. W. C. A. cabi- 
net in honor of Mrs. Curtis. 
Phi Nu chafing dish party. They used the 
tomato rarebit receipt given in the Greetings. 
It was good. 
Sophomore dinner party. Three tables full of 

Sophies dressed in their best. 
Dr .Marker returned. 
Jan. 1 1 — Dr. Marker at chapel spoke of the "Three Calls." 
Mrs. Curtis gave an interesting missionary 
talk to the Y. W. C. A. 
Jan. 12— Clarence Eddy, organ recital. 
Jan. 13 — Mrs. Marker, Mrs. Metcalf and little George left 
for California. 

Page Twenty-two 



Jan. 


6 


Jan. 


7 


Jan. 


8 


Jan. 


9 



W\}t CoUege (greetings! 



Jan. l5— Dr. Black lectured to the Science and Mathema- 
tics Club on the subject of "Eugenics." 

Jan, 16 — Expression student term recital. Subject, 'The 
Child World." 

Jan. 19 — Recital, Miss McKay, voice. 

Jan. 20 — Belles Lettres alumnae program. 

Jan. 26 — Organ and violin recital, Mr. Donald and Direc- 
tor Swarthout. 

Jan. 29 — Exams begin. 

Jan. 30 — More exams. 

Jan. 31 — Semester ends — a chance to begin over. 
Montague Flowers (lecture). 

1913 ENDOWMENT AND IMPROVEMENT FUND 
(To January 15, 1914) 

Since the last report, which was made November 22, 
1913, there has been paid in a total of $3,649.04 by thir- 
ty-six subscribers. Twelve of these have generously paid 
the entire subscription, which is greatly appreciated. 
Twenty-four have made partial payments. Of the twelve 
hundred twenty-six subscribers to the Fund, four hundred 
have now paid in full ; four hundred seventy-six have paid 
in part; and three hundred fifty have not yet made any 
payments on their pledges. It is hoped that these will 
make their payments soon, and that m.any of them will 
find it possible to give the entire amount in one payment. 

The following is a summary: 

Total amount pledged $182,242.95 

Amount paid November 22, 1913 99,377.85 

Balance due November 22, 1913 82,865.10 

Amount paid by 36 friends from November 

22, 1913, to January 15, 1914 3,649.04 

Balance due January 15, 1914 79,216.06 

Total amount now paid 103,026.89 



Page Twenty-three 



i|ininiinirnniiiijiMrii:iiMitiiiiiiiiiiiiiitriniiMriHinniiiiiiiiiniiiiiMniniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiijiniiiiiiiiiinnniniiniiiinnnuiiiMiiniiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii(iiiiiiiiiiiiiiimHi 

I THE TWENTY DEPARTMENTS in our store are 

I just like twenty little stores, every one devoted to 

I the sale and display of articles For the Modern 

I Woman's wear. 

I Each Department makes a determined and successful 

i effort to show first the ATTRACTIVE NEW STYLES 

I OF THE SEASON. You'll find shopping- pleasant 

I here. 



Kid Gloves 
Neckwear 
Fabric Gloves 
Ivinen 

White Goods 
Notions 
lyaces and 



Corsets 

Art Goods 

Petticoats 

Handkerchiefs 

Ribbons 

Toilet Goods 

Jewelry and 



Knit Underwear 
Hosiery 

Children's Wear 
Muslin Underwear 
and Waists 
Coats and Suits 
Dresses 



Embroideries 



Leather 



? It \14¥#.^^ P^\IF4\P5^# It ll 

' W ?# ^ ^iSi^s®s#** ^sssssss* 'asssssssi ^ssssss ««s!ssissS 

LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 

FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

Footwear for all occasions — 
Street Shoes 

Dress Slippers 

Bed-room Slippers 

13: o :f ^ El K. s' 

We Repair Shoes 




J. A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYKI 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

Pennants, Stationery, Tennis Goods, Drugfs, School 
Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory- 
Books and Photo Albums 
"pleased customers" — our motto 
Goods Delivered 



Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St. and Squar 

fiiiiiiuiiiiiniuiiniiwMiiMiHiuiiiiimiiiiiunH(iMiiiiiNuniimiHunHumMUiinNiiiuiuiiiiiuuHniuiiiniuuHiwiiiMiiuiuHiiiiHitiwuHuiMiiwuHiimuHiiiiw 



niiiiiiniiiiiiini[niiniininimiiiiMriniMiiii[i[[i[iMiiintni[iiiiiiMiMMiMiiiiiiiMirHriiriiiiiniiiMiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'^ 



Otto Speith 
pboto portraiture 



Our Portraits were accepted and hung at the National Convention 
in Kansas City 1913 



Formerly Watson Studio 



Southwest Corner Square 



^ESTATt' 



i 



foto 
MULLENIX & HAMILTON 

For Everything Sweet 

Hot and Cold Sodas 

216 East state Street 



Coover&Shrevel 

Have a complete line of | 

Drugs, Kodaks, Perfumes, j 
Stationery and Holiday Giftsf 

We do Developing" & Printing-! 



" *>>I>>>>>IIII>IIIIIIIUIIIIIIUIIIIHIUI|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| lltlillli 



East and West Side Square | 

IllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIUIUiUIIUUIilllli 



jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHHiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiniiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniMiiiiiiiiiini^ 

s 

I The most dainty thing's in Ring's and Jewelry. 

I New and handsome styles of g^oods in Sterling' Silver 

I Highest grades of Cut Glass, and every 

I description of Spectacles and Eye Glasses 

I Fine Diamonds a Specialty 

I at J, 

I russe:ll & LYON'S i 

I The Oldest Established Jewelry House in Central Illinois 

I West Side Square 

I Both Phones 96 







All the Faculty, Students and Frie 




Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say 


of the College should have a Cheok 
or Savings Account with 




We can furnish your 
Shoes and Party Slippers 


F. G. FARREL.L & G 




in the popular styles, 


BANKERS 




leathers, and 


F. E. Farrell, President 




fabrics 


E. E. Crabtree, Vice-President 
H. H. Potter, Cashier 






M. W. Osborne, Asst. Ca»hier 



Miss C. had vainly searched the library for the Apoc- 
rypha. Attendant — "I can't find it. Some one must 
have it out, but it isn't a very popular book." 



(grapfjic 
Contern 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAIv OCCASIONS 



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For those who discriminate I 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to | 

please the students who come to our city. We select only the | 

best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. I 

Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and | 

Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. | 

Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all | 

College functions. | 

Vickery Si Merrigan I 

C:>A,TEFIEF=5^ | 

227 West State Street | 



|3oth Phones 309 



SAFEST PLrACE TO TRADE 

f^ILLERBY'^ 

DRY GOODS STORE 



West Side Square 



Brady Bros. I 

Everything- in Hardware andf 
Paints i 



F. H. — Why, I felt just like a lion in a den of Daniels. 

G. V. U, — Well, if Socrates and I agree, then the rest 
of you should be satisfied. 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . |20o,ooo 
Surplus . . 34,000 

Deposits . , . 1,100,000 

U. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 

Julius B. Strawn, President 
Chas. B. Graff, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear 

H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

J. R. Robertson 

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Jacksonville, tu.» 

Established 1890 

Ivow Prices Square Dealing- 
Keep us busy 



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I Coats, Suits and Skirts tailored to your individual 

I measure and form at 

! POPULAR PRICES 

I All work made in our own shop by expert workmen. We 

I guarantee to fit you. 

I JACKSONVILLE TAILORING COMPANY 1 



I 233 East State Street 



Opposite Pacific Hotel 



Seraphina — I like an east room because you can see 
the sunrise in the morning. 



IHARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL CO. 

[ Designs, Cut Flowers, 
I Plants 

I Southwest Corner Square 

j Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 
I Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greenhouses, Bell 775 



McGINNIS' 

The Youngs Ladies' Shoe Store 

See the "BABY DOLL SHOE. 
It's the Latest. 

We carry a full line of Bvening Slippc 
in all colore. 

If it's new, we have it 

JAS. McGINNIS & CC 

Bast Side Square 



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F 
E 
R 

N 

FROM S 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

Both Phones 



Want 

Cut flowers 



Classy Styles 
e will be pleased to show you our line 

FROST & NOLLEY 

i'ashionable Footwear 

For All Occasions 
J South Side Sq. Jacksonville, 111. 



Job Printing 

Of All Kinds 



John K* Long 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 



213 West Morgan Street: 
Illinois Phone 400 i 



Seraphina's brother (during vacation) — Does Mrs. 
Cowbell teach German or Math? I should think she'd 
prefer zoology. 



Dorwart Market 

ALL, KINDS OF 

^RESH and SALT MKATS 
FISH, POULTRY, Etc. 

ioth phones 196 230 W. State St. 

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KODAK FINISHING 

Vulcan Roll Films 

Cameras from $2.00 up 
Everything- strictly first class 

Vail & Vail 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. 



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PHOTOGRAPHER 



Successor to McCullough Bros. 



East Side Square 



1 Cameras, Films, Papers, 




1 Photo Supplies for Kodakcrs 
iDeveloping't Printing; and Moontingf 


S. S. Kresge Cc 


1 at reasonable prices 

1 


5c & IOC Store 


1 Armstrongs Orug Store 


New and Up-to-Date 


1 South West Corner Square 





G. W. — Yes, Dr. Black said that plants took in oxy- 
gen and gave off carbolic acid. 1 am sure that's what he 
said. 



Ask your grocer for 

HOLSUM 



BRE^AD 



1 Made Clean. Delivered clean 
I in waxed paper wrappers 



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H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Art Needle Work 
and Millinery 

211 West state Street 



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INTEC3F?l"rY I 

have built «p our GROCERY and DRUG Departments on a solid! 
mdation of INTEGRITY, In our GROCERY and DRUGS WEI 
Y WHAT WE BELIEVE, and our customers BELIEVE WHAT| 
i SAY. Every item in our store is an example of PURS FOOD,! 
EAN FOOD, GOOD FOOD and BEST DRUGS. I 

JRS is a GROCERY AND DRUG STORE with a CONSCIENCE! 

tnesSOO K/OBIEK^TB BZ^OS. Phones 8O0I 

Grocery — Pharmacy | 



29 South Side Sq. 



e Sell 

hoenix Guaranteed 

Silk Hosiery 



j/COi 



armc/M 



DRY GOODS STORF 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 

A. L. Bromley 

Ladies' Tailor 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and 
Repairitjg. Ladies' Man Tail- 
ored Suits to order. Remodeling 
of all kinds. Special rates to 
I. W. C. students. All work 
called for and delivered promptly 



G. J. — What a shame, after all that trouble and sus- 
pense — • 

E. B. — Oh, no, it wasn't any expense. 



[11. Phone 57 



Bell Phone 92 



Fresh Drugs, 
Fancy Goods 
Stationery 



THE 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



Ba(lQ6r Druo Siore 

2 doors West of Postoffice 
235 E. State Street 

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s 

I It will pay you to visit 

I SCHRAM'S 

I Jewelry Store 

I COLLEGE PINS, RINGS, SPOONS, ETC. 



I Len G. Magill 
I Printer 

I Kast State Street 111. Phone 418 



T AYLOR'^ 

Grocery 

A g"ood place to trade 
221 West State Street 



Seraphina — Does your mother have to write to the 
Dean for permission for you to wear an engagement ring 
after Christmas? 



Montgomery & Depp 



i IN THEIR NEW PLACE ON THE WEST SIDE 01 
I THE SQUARE ARE SHOWING 

I EVERYTHING IN 

I Dry Goods and Ready-to-Wear Garments 

I Telephone for the Fall Catalogue 



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College Jewelrv [ 

Engraved Cards and Invitations | 

Chafing Dishes, Copper and Brass Goods I 

Special Die Stationery I 

21 South Side Square | 



lepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 

HERE TO PLEASE 

Candies Cakes 

Cookies Pies 

Sandwiches Pop on Ice 

Groceries California Fruits 
School Suppiies 




miU§ 



Jacksonville's foremost Men's Store r 

Mackinaw and Sweater Coats| 

Mannish Cut and Form Fitting | 

Hand Bag's, Suit Cases and | 
Trunks I 

I. W. C. Banners and Pillows| 

SPECIAL DESIGNS ON REQUEST | 



Seraphina — Miss X looked at me so coldly in class to- 
day that I've been sneezing ever since. 



Seraphina — This morning has been so long that 1 can't 
even remember all of it. 



adies' Late Style Sweater 
Coats 



Are Sold by 



^rank Byrns 



Hat 
Store 



C. S. MARTINI 

Wall Paper, Painting | 

and Interior Decorating | 

Pictures and Frames | 

314 W. state St., Scott Block | 

Jacksonville, 111. | 



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Cafe 



Confectionary 



Ipeacock inn 



I Catering- 



Soda 



Candies 



I SKIRT BOXERS 

I ROCKERS. SCREE)NS, 
I DESKS AND 

I BED ROOM CURTAINS 

I AT 

iJohnson, Hackett & Guthrii 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



[PIPE YOUR HOUSE FOR 

I lacksonville Railway 
and Light Co* 

5 

I 224 S. Main Street 



SHOES 



SLIPPEI 



The only Popular Price Shoe St( 

in the city 

The only Shoe Store catering 

special orders 

The newest shoes for the least 

money 

JOHNSON BROS. 

Under Farrell's Bank W. State & : 



I SHEET MUSIC, MUSIC MERCHANDISE 

I TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 

I AND SUPPLIES 

I 19 SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE 



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J. BART JOHNSON | 

Everything Musical [ 



PIANOS, PLAYER PIANOS, VICTROIvAS, 

IMPORTER OF VIOLINS, AND A COMPLETE 

LINE OF MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 



[9 South Side Square 



Albyn Lincoln Adams 



Oculist and Anrist 
to the State School for the Blind 



323 West State Street 

Practice limited to diseases of the 
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



DR ALPHA B. APPLEBEEf 
Dentist | 

326 West State St. I 



Miss S. — You don't take the Greetings? Oh, you must. 
Dr. McC. — Of course I will. Where's the editor? 
Miss S. — The girl in white. 

Dr. McC. — That girl? That's no editor! That's 
Abbie ! 



DR. BYRON S. GAILEY 

EYE, EAR, 
NOSE AND THROAT 



OflBce and Residence 
340 West State Street 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 
Jno. B. Snell, Prop. 
Rates $2.25, I2.50, and $3.00 per day 
One Block West of Woman's College 
Opposite Post OflBce 
Rooms with or without bath 
l/ocal and Long Distance Telephone 

in every room. 



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Andre & Andre 

Kverything' in I 

High Grade House Furnishin! 

for E^verybody, E^verywhere 
46-50 North Side Square 



I CAFE BATZ 

I And Annex for Ladies 

X 

I 221-223 East State Street 

illlinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111. 
Illinois Phone 388 



Other papers all remind us 

We can make our own sublime 
If our fellow schoolmates send us 

Contributions all the time. 
Here a little, there a little 

Story, schoolmates, song or jest 
If you want a good school paper. 

Each of you must do your best. 

— Exchange. 



Florence Kirk King 
Hair Dresser 

special Service in Shampooing 
Scalp Treatment, Manufacturing 
Hair into Latest Styles 

Work done by appointment 
111. Phone 837 503 W. College St. 



Cherry's Livery 

Finest Light and Hea\ 
Livery- 
Lowest Rates 

335-237, 302-304-306 North Main Stii 



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rirlst Patronise our Advertisers 



Ayers National Bank 

Founded 1852 



Capital 
^^200,000 

Surplus 
^^0,000 




Deposits 
^1,2^0,000 

United States 
Depository 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 

Special Window for Ladies 
Ladies' Waiting- Room 
We make a feature of Ladies' Accounts, and have 
provided facilities for their exclusive use 



OFFICERS 
M. p. Dunlap, President O. F. Buffe, Cashier 

Andrew Rassel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 

R. M. Hockenhull, Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst. Cashier 

C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 



Owen P, Thompson 
Edward F. Goltra 
John W. Leach 



DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhull 
M. F. Dunlap 



Harry M. Capps 
O. F. Buffe 
Andrew Rnasel 



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Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1860 



Exteneion 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEG 

I College of Liberal Arts 

I (Full classical and scientific courses) 

I College of Music 

I' School of Fine Arts 
School of Expression 

I School of Home Economics 

s 

I ^A Standard College — one of the best. 

I Regular college and academy courses 

I leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 

I inently a Christian college with every 

I facility for thorough work. Located 

I in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 

I dignified, old college town, noted for 

I its literary and music atmosphere. 
I Let us have names of your friends 

I who are looking for a good college. 
I Call or address, Registrar 

i Illinois Woman's College, 

I Jacksonville, 111. 




^HNIIIIIMinUIHNHtHIIIIUimiHUUIIIIIHIinillUMIHIIIIIHUMHIUIIIIHMIUIIIItlUIHHIHHHIMHIHNNUIIIUmWUHUIIIIIKHHIN 



tCfje College (greetings 

<[J The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
€jf Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

€| Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
€| Entered at Jacksonville PostoflSce as second class matter. 



Contents 

Editorials 3 

Winged Victor}^ 4 

And so We Are 6 

By a Spectator 8 

Personal Observation 9 

What's the Difference 9 

On Table Manners 9 

The American School at Rome 10 

The Day of Prayer 11 

The College Council 12 

Student Government 12 

Locals 13 

Y. W. C. A 14 

College Calendar 15 

Alumnae Notes , 16 

Chafing Dish Recipes 17 

Expression Notes 18 

Music Notes 18 

Art Notes 19 

Phi Nu 20 

Belles Lettres 21 

Theta Sigma 21 

Lambda Mu 21 

Acadamea .... 22 

Exchanges 23 



Thk 

Graphic Arts 

Concern 



"AN OLD STORY" 

A certain father of a family to whom there was a 
sufficiently large farm, moreover a son in whom he 
especially rejoiced, gave this one for a gift on his 
birthday a little axe. He exhorted him greatly to use 
the weapon with the highest care, lest it might be for 
a detriment to himself. The youth promised him- 
self to be about to obey. 

When it was necessary for that one, on account 
of business, to seek a certain walled town situated not 
far, this one, the axe having been hastily seized, de- 
parts into the garden, about to cut down each most 
flourishing cherry tree. 

That one, his home having been resought, in- 
flamed with wrath, the servants being called together, 
asked who might have been the author of this so 
great slaughter. All were denying, when this one, 
running up to that one, "Truly, by Hercules," said he, 
"O my father, 1 am unable to lie; I, myself, cut down 
the tree with that little axe which thou gavest to me 
for a present." 



Vol. XVII Jacksonville, 111., March, 1914 No. 6 

Faculty Committee— Miss Mothershead, Miss Baker, Miss 

Johnston. 
Editor -Abbie Peavoy 

Associate Editors — Erma Elliott, Helena Munson, Helen McGhee 
Business Managers — Geneva Upp, Winifred Burmeister, Alma 
Harmel 

One day a notice was put upon the Bulletin Board 
asking for Free Press Items on topics of college interest. 
It was believed that some few of the three hundred college 
and academy girls would respond to the suggestion. Daily 
the Greetings box was opened, but no articles had been 
put in; no contributions except the departmental and so- 
ciety reports. If the free contributions in the Greetings 
box were our only source of material, no one should be 
so very much interested in our college paper. Girls, it's 
"up to you." We can't have a paper without material. 
We can't get material unless you are willing to write. 
What if we should have to elect our editor and staff mem- 
bers, as is done by Wellesley college, from the girls who 
have made free contributions to the college paper? There 
are, of course, two sides to the collecting of material. In 
the doing of what has been asked of individuals the staff 
has no complaint to make, but our paper needs the enthu- 
siasm which would come from interested, spontaneous 
contributions. The Greetings asks for your support. 

The Courier office sent down for the use of the 
Greetings' contributors copy paper. The paper is made 
to fit the copy-holder, therefore it is for their convenience 
that we use it. Any contributor may have it by calling 
at the office. Write across the pad and your reports will 
not need to be recopied. 

Page Three 



tK,f)e College (greetings; 





WINGED VICTORY. 

During" the Hellenistic times as it had been in earlier 
Greece, the custom of setting up a statue of the goddess 
Victory in celebration of a successful battle or campaign 
was usual; and the Louvre possesses a statue, found on 
Samothrace, which is a magnificent example of the cus- 
tom. The Victory of Samothrace was found in 1863, 
broken into a multitude of fragments, which have been 
carefully united, but there are no modern pieces, except 
the wings. The statue stood on a pedestal having the 
form of a ship's prow, the principal parts of which were 
found by an Austrian expedition to Samothrace in 1875. 
These fragments were subsequently conveyed to the 
Louvre, and the Victory now stands on her original pedes- 
tal. She was erected on Samothrace by Demetrius of 
Macedon, to commemorate a naval victory over the 
Egyptians in 306 B. C. We do not know who was the 
sculptor of the statue, but certain silver coins by Deme- 
trius bear upon one side a Victory which agrees closely 
with that of Samothrace, even to the great prow pedestal. 

Page Four 



^f)e College #reetins£f 




U seems reasonably certain, because of the close resem- 
blance betv/een coin-type and statue, that the Victory was 
dedicated at Samothrace by Demetrius soon after the naval 
battle with the Egyptians and that the commemorative 
coins borrowed their design directly from the statue. Thus 
we get a date for the statue, and clear evidence as to how 
it should be restored. 

The figure of the goddess is considerably larger than 
life size, and is represented as standing on the prow of a 
ship. With her right hand she holds a trumpet to her 
lips, with her left she carries a cross-tree, the frame-work 
of a trophy. The ship upon which she has just alighted 
is thought to be under way, and her wings are outspread 
behind her, and her drapery is swept by the wind so as to 
cling close to her body in front, and to stream in heavy 
masses away from her limbs. She glides through space 
easil}', hardly using her wings. Her knees are scarcely 
bent, and the figure does not seem to advance by its own 
speed, but by that of the ship on which it stands. The 
head is gone, but one never fails to see in the beautiful 
body the joy with which the swift motion through space 
has pervaded her. 

In order to realize the great effect of Victory, we 
may compare it with the Victory of Paeonius. There is 
a vigor and force about Victory of Samothrace which 
carry us away at the first impression ; but from it one turns 
with relief to rest on the simpler statue of Paeonius. This 
seems to be the effect of the drapery which has no breadth 
or system. Victory of Samothrace seems more impetu- 
ous and imposing, while Victory of Paeonius leaves us 
calm; this gives us a sense of onward motion against the 
salt sea air. Yet there is nothing sensational about this 
work; some of it reminds us of the finest bits of modelling 
in earlier work, and is doubtless imitated from them ; other 
parts of it show a close and careful study from nature and 
there is something about the statue which must have been 
very effective in the surroundings amidst which the statue 
was erected, in the open air, and in open country. Then 

Page Five 




— ^■^BMB— — MfiMtiirrnTsaagBi 

^i}t CoUege #reeting« 




it must have been almost startling to come upon this effect- 
ive Victory, rushing through the air on her ship to an- 
nounce her tidings. 

Gardner said, the figure is best appreciated if one re- 
vives memories of a similarly swift motion experienced, 
for instance, in the prow of an ocean steamer. For the 
moment the cares of the world fall away, and one is filled 
with a sense of confidence. It is then that the essence of 
real victory is felt, which is faith in the success of the no- 
blest ideals. This was the artist's conception. Success 
has crowned his endeavors, for he has struck a true chord 
of every man's heart. 

Mutilated though the statue now is, it is as well liked 
by peasant or tourist who happens to stray into the large 
hall of the Louvre, as by the scholar who goes there to 
study. 

AND SO WE ARE. 

In the days when the College was struggling against 
various reverses. Belles Lettres and Phi Nu societies were 
striving to maintain their existence and the high standards 
they had set themselves. Their first meetings were held 
in some vacant class room, the key that locked the door 
being the only symbol of their authority. Later, as their 
membership grew, the two societies met in the chapel, at 
the same time, in opposite corners of the room, with other 
people at perfect liberty to pass in and out. The compli- 
cations that ensued resulted in meetings held in alternate 
weeks. The president, soon after this, decreed that a fac- 
ulty member be present at all society meetings. The girls 
rebelled and locked the faculty member out, after which a 
committee sought the president with their grievances and 
they were finally permitted to hold their meetings in peace. 
When property on the west of the College was purchased, 
the societies were given rooms in an old house on that lot. 
The girls were all enthusiasm for at last they were going to 
have homes of their own. With their own hands they 

Page Six 



^fje College Greetings; 



^^ 



scrubbed and scoured and cleaned, painting the floors 
themselves. The girls of the present cannot quite realize 
with what devotion and loyalty those other girls did ser- 
vice for ivy leaf or shield. When plans were made for the 
extension of the old building, the two societies pledged 
five hundred dollars each, on provision that they have 
halls in the new addition, in exchange for those in the old 
louse which was to be torn down. These halls were in 
vhat is now the library, and it was with a "home-at-last" 
feeling that they held their first meetings there. The girls 
tlemselves decorated the rooms and worked energetically 
tc pay off the indebtedness. It v/as a jubilant meeting 
that celebrated the last payment. But they had not been 
loig here when Marker Hall was built and rooms there 
wtre promised to both societies. They moved again, tak- 
ing with them the furniture that had been added, piece by 
pie;e, and established themselves in their present homes. 
It las been with a feeling of joy and pride that a new piece 
of 'urniture, a picture or some piece of statuary has been 
adced to the present home-like and attractive halls. 

Last year, because of the growth of the College and 
the limited memberships of the tv/o old societies, charters 
wee granted to Lambda Mu and Theta Sigma, in the Col- 
leg;, and to the Academea Society in the Academy. To 
then has not yet been granted the time for a long history, 
buias proud possessors of parlors on fourth and fifth Har- 
kei Hall they deem themselves ready to fill each year as 
ful of progress as they have had in their beginning year. 

It has not been one stride but a series of steps that 
hasled from those basement meetings of long ago to the 
me tings held today in the halls and parlors of the societies. 
Muh credit is due to those girls of other years who helped 
laythe strong and true foundations on which the societies 
of oday stand. 

Winifred Robinson, '17. 

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JICf)t College ^reetingg 



BY A SPECTATOR. 

If some of us who think perhaps that our privileges 
are too curtailed, could only understand what the inani- 
mate objects of the building might tell us, we should prob- 
ably change our minds on some points. Maybe we can 
learn something from the clock — suppose we ask it. 

"Mr. Solemn Clock-in-the-front-hall, what can you 
tell us about changes in privileges since you came here tc 
live?" 

"Br-r-r! Wait till! strike ten. That's for lights out. 
Well, to begin with, that used to be at 9:30. Why, even i 
the Y. W. cabinet had to meet from 9:00 to 9:30, and it 1 
was an unheard-of thing for anyone to have a light pe"- 
mission after ten o'clock. No, not even for mission stucy 
classes. That makes me think of Sundays. The giils 
used to march before me in one line with the Lady Princi- 
pal at the head on their way to church. No individial 
church-going, then! Not much! Evening quiet hour le- 
gan at seven, and they say not even four girls could be 
together in one room. Could you tell me, is it so tlat 
some actually cook on Sunday now ? What is this sch(ol 
coming to ? The smell of fudge or toast on Sunday a ffw 
years ago would have made us all faint. As for stayhg 
up from evening luncheon, that would have been a mtst 
unseemly thing for any young female to do. Wha's 
that? Oh, the walks. Yes, it certainly is true that one 
upon a time the whole school walked together at far 
o'clock. Why, it was considered a great concession whtn 
the line was allowed to go beyond the block; alwa;s, 
though, with a teacher at the head and end of the liie. 
As for shopping, that was always on Mondays only, a|id 
always with faculty chaperonage. I wish some of te 
Academy girls would take ii. from me that they have mcft 
privileges as it is than they ever would have without Cil- 
lege connection." I 

"Oh, you're not quitting, are you, Mr. Clock 

But see, his pendulum has stopped swinging. W^l 

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1g^f)t CoOes^ ^vtttinqi 




have to wait till Tom Mnnds him again, then maybe he can 
tell us more. 

WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE? 

"For goodness sake, Helen, don't turn off that light 

yet. Miss won't be around for a few minutes, and I 

just have to finish this letter to-night, I won't have time 
in the morning to do it. (Knock at door.) Well, she 
hasn't had to call us down many times before for keeping 
on the light, so what's the difference? " 

PERSONAL OBSERVATION. 

Did you ever go strolling down the corridor about 
ten o'clock at night and watch the curious phenomena 
which takes place ? First, on your left a light flashes off 
and stays off; they are Freshmen. Then, on your left a 
light burns brightly on; they are Seniors and have light 
per. Then comes a curious little procedure: the light 
flashes off; you stand still and watch; the light goes on 
again; you take a step or two forward and off it goes. 
This curious little succession of movements continue until 
you have left the floor. They are Sophomores. On you 
wander, viewing lights on, lights off, and lights going on 
and off, until your own corridor teacher appears and sends 
you home a-hiking. 

L. McCloud, '16. 

TABLE MANNERS. 

We've had a talk about these things 

Which we sometimes forget. 
We mean our table manners and 

What's called etiquette. 

Don't leave your knife upon your plate 

For it is most uncouth 
And it might slip when buttersmeared, 

Oh what a shame, forsooth! 

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tCfie College (Jlreetingsi 



If you are careful of the cloth 

And truly well brought up 
You will not leave your spoon 

To swing 'round in your coffee cup. 

Be careful of your knife and fork 

To use them properly, 
A "cello grip" is always bad 

'cept in an orchestry. 

Don't smack your lips nor thip your thoup" 

Nor 'cross the table yell. 
If they can't hear, don't strain your voice 

Nor all your troubles tell. 

When nervous and embarrassed quite 

Don't play with napkin rings 
Or twiddle with the forks and spoons 

Or other table things. 

Phyllis Wilkinson, 17. 

When head of table is not not there 
Salute her substitute so fair — 
When soup we drink or eat or sip 
Put only side of spoon to lip — 
If you would stir your coffee cup 
Don't leave your spoon a-stickin' up — 
When sitting at the dining table 
Converse as well as you are able. 

Naomi Davis. 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL AT ROME. 

A recent number of the Classical Journal has given 
an account of the uniting of the American Academy of 
Fine Arts at Rome with the former American School of 
Classical Studies, and described the present equipment and 
the facilities for research and study. 

Under the new organization the school is part of a 

Page Ten 




(S^fje Collese (Greetings; 



very strong institution. It occupies permanent quarters 
on the Janiculum, well fitted in size and equipment to its 
present requirements and as far as could be seen into the 
future. The library of the United Academy, which is very 
large and well chosen, has been placed at its disposal, and 
a specially designed room provided for the museum. 

The size of the new institution has made possible the 
long wished-for summer session for teachers, beginning 
about July 1 and lasting until August 12, which will be 
especially beneficial to those who cannot leave their pro- 
fessional duties in America at any other time. 

Women are admitted on the same terms as before, 
but men now have the special advantage of living in the 
dormitory. It is hoped that in the further expansion of 
the school a dormitory will soon be provided for women 
also. 

^^ 
DAY OF PRAYER. 

On Thursday, February 5, was the Day of Prayer for 
colleges, a day which means much to every girl in this Col- 
lege. The girls were brought to a more reverent and 
thoughtful attitude toward the significance of the Day of 
Prayer in the corridor prayer meetings, held on Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday mornings, and in the. mass- 
prayer meeting in the reception room on Wednesday even- 
ing. In these meetings the girls helped one another by 
discussing their own religious experiences and spiritual life. 

On Thursday morning classes met the first two hours. 
At ten o'clock each of the different classes and the faculty 
held short meetings, in which the different phases of our 
religious work were discusssed. 

Bishop Shepard of Kansas City gave the morning 
address. He spoke of the greatness of our possessions. 
We have the world, life, death, all things present, and all 
things to come through Christ, for Christ is God's. He 
spoke with such conviction of the truth in his message, that 
he inspired in us all a desire to live for Christ. 

Page Eleven 




^i)t CoUegE Greetings! 



In the afternoon Dr. Marker, the faculty and the stu- 
dents met in the old chapel for an hour together, a custom 
which is dear to all here. Reports of the morning faculty 
and class prayer meetings were given. Dr. Marker gave 
a short talk on religious experiences and naturalness of 
religion. The rest of the hour was spent in song, prayer 
and short remarks on what religion means to us. It was 
a blessed hour in which we put aside all else, to consider 
hoAv we stood with God and to reconsecrate our lives to 
His service. 

THE COLLEGE COUNCIL. 

The College Council's main activity the last few 
months has been in connection with the starting of stu- 
dent government. The appointment of the Forwards and 
Backwards Committees were made by the Council. The 
Committee on evaluation of outside work done by the stu- 
dents has made its final report. Irene Crum acted as 
chairman of the committee. 

The May Day ceremonies have been discussed. The 
Council's suggestion that all the exercises with the excep- 
tion of grand march, may pole drill and lantern drill be 
from the rhythm classes was approved. 

An item perhaps of lesser interest, a fact perhaps not 
known to all, is the day's vacation at Easter time, which 
has kindly been granted at the request of the Council. 

^? 
STUDENT GOVERNMENT. 

For several months a student committee of five mem- 
bers, with Helen Harrison as chairman, has been working 
on the constitution and by-laws for the temporary form 
of student house government. The by-laws provide for 
fourteen proctors, twelve elected by the separate corridors, 
one elected by the academy at large and one senior elected 
by the college students, who is chairman of the board. 
The duties of the proctors shall be to enforce all regula- 

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^fje CoUege Greetings! 



tions in the College and to inform the students whom they 
are representing of all matters decided upon by the Board 
of Proctors. This committee also formulated certain 
rules based upon the report of another committee on old 
and established rules and customs. These regulations 
cover general house deportment, the church going, chapel 
cuts, lights and general permissions. 

After a series of house meetings, the resident students 
have now, with a few amendments, accepted the proposed 
outline for a trial month. The faculty have been very 
kind and helpful and have allowed the constitution and 
general rules to stand with but few changes. It now re- 
mains only to elect the proctor board when the experi- 
ment will begin. The student body is as a whole so en- 
thusiastic that we feel confident of the success of the 
movement. 

LOCALS. 

On the seventh and eighth of February, Miss Craw- 
ford visited us in the interest of the one, two and three 
year volunteer movements. Saturday evening Dr. Mar- 
ker entertained the Y. W. cabinet at dinner to meet Miss 
Crawford, and then she at the Y. W. meeting on Sunday 
afternoon gave to the students an interesting talk on the 
need for one, two or three years of missionary service, 
giving an opportunity for travel and close study of a for- 
eign race, and the call for college graduates to supply the 
need. She also told us of other work that the service 
circle could take up in the line of social service right at 
home. Any one wanting fuller particulars of the work, 
see Miss Dorothy Stevens. 

Those carrying off the honors in the recent physical 
examinations were: 

Height — Annie Floreth, 5 ft, 7 3-8 in.; Naomi Davis, 
5 ft. 6 5-8 in. 

Upper chest expansion — Alta Marie Miller, 3 5-8 in.; 
Rachel Morris, 3 3-8 in. 

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^Ije CoUege (^reetingg 




Lower chest expansion — Rachel Morris, 4 5-16 in.; 
Letta Irwin, 4 5-16 in. ; Vivian Newman, 4 5-16 in. 

Lateral chest expansion — Ada Thompson, 2 in.; 
Helen Dinsmore, 1 5-8 in. ; Wilma Miller, 1 5-8 in. 

Chest depth expansion — Mabel Stoltz, 1 3-4 in.; 
Louise Hughes, 1 3-8 in. 

Lung capacity — Mary Baldridge, 2 70; Nina Slaten, 
263; Peril Hess, 25 1. 

"Prunes and prisms" have seen hard usage this 
month. All sorts of beautiful come-off expressions have 
been floating around, only to be grabbed up by some poor 
one, whose turn it was to go to the photographers. Such 
then gave place to anxious, care-worn examination faces 
as soon as the Annual picture taking time was over. 

Y. W. C. A. 

At a business meeting on February thirteenth, the fol- 
lowing were elected to office for the year beginning 
March first: Ruth Want, president; Helen McGhee, vice- 
president; Alice Tombaugh, treasurer; Alma Weber, sec- 
retary. The chairmen of committees are yet to be ap- 
pointed by the old cabinet. 

The latest venture of the cabinet is a weekly stunt 
night to take place every Wednesday from dinner till seven 
o'clock. The purpose is simply a general social time, 
with the emphasis on the general. There is room for 
everyone in the Belles Lettres and Phi Nu halls. It is 
hoped that every resident student will do her best to help 
everyone else have a good time and that requests for 
stunts will fairly run over each other. If you've never 
given a stunt, begin now — it's lots of fun. The best 
thing about it is that affairs planned in a hurry are usually 
more successful than elaborately arranged programs. 

Y. W. has in the last month received several guests, 
among whom were Mrs. Mary Carr Curtis, the student sec- 
retary of the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the 
Methodist Church, and Miss Ruth Crawford of St. Louis, 

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tlTlje College (Jlreetingsf 



a volunteer representative of the one-year plan for service 
in the mission field. 

The Association has been making a collection of cast- 
off clothing-, especially shoes, which are to be turned over 
to the Associated Charities for distribution. 

On the Day of Prayer was started a new and promis- 
ing department of the Y. W. C. A., called the Service 
Circle. The idea is to band together all who are willing 
to take the following pledge: "Because I love Jesus 
Christ and His church, it is my purpose to seek to know 
what He will have me do, to use every effort to under- 
stand the various kinds of service taught by Him, and to 
engage in some kind of definite Christian work wherever 
I may be." Many students wish to pledge themselves to 
Christian work, but do not yet know in what field. For 
such the circle is formed. It will also include any who 
may have already planned their life-work, as the Student 
Volunteer. Every member of the senior class has signed 
this pledge, and it is hoped that others, especially upper- 
class students, will soon signify their interest. 

COLLEGE CALENDAR. 

Y. W. pie sale. Table seats changed. 

Tennis players out. 

Messrs. Swarthout in recital. 

House meeting for discussion of constitution for 

student government. Heated discussion on 

part of preps. 
Exams. Every one is sighing. 
Exams. Exams are at the door. 
Exams. College girls are cramming who 

never crammed before. 
"Hamlet" read by Flowers. 
Feb. 1 They say "The first of February was the last of 

June." 
Feb. 2 Short talk in chapel by Mr. Crawford of St. 

Louis. 

Page Fifteen 



Jan. 


24 


Jan. 


25 


Jan. 


26 


Jan. 


28 


Jan. 


29 


Jan. 


30 


Jan. 


31 



Cfje CoUcge d^reettngjf 



Feb. 3 

Feb. 5 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 7 

Feb. 8 

Feb. 9 
Feb. 10 
Feb. 11 
Feb. 12 



Feb. 13 
Feb. 14 



Feb. 


15 


Feb. 


16 


Feb. 


21 


Feb. 


22 


Feb. 


23 


Feb. 


28 



Miss Cowgill talked at the City Library on Crime 
and Punishment. 

Day of Prayer. 

Pie sale by Academy Specials. 

Faculty entertained at cake party by Mrs. 
Wilson. 

Miss Ruth Crawford talked on the one- year 
movement and social service in Y. W. 

Two lectures by Mr. Griggs on Art. 

New girl taken into societies. 

First student stunt night. 

Lincoln's Birthday. 

First year cookery class begins sale of hermits. 

Miss Mothershead reported on faculty's accept- 
ance of the student government constitution. 

Council meeting. 

Y. W. election. 

Mass meeting. 

Election for chairman of May Day committee, 
Helen Harrison chosen. 

Valentine parties in the dining room. Songs, 
yells, hearts, ice-cream and pickle-doters 
much in evidence. 

Y. W. meeting. Leader, Feril Hess. Subject, 
Why should I go to Church? 

Lambda Alpha Mu presents "Betty Wales and 
Mr. Kidd." 

Washington's Birthday celebrated with a half- 
holiday, and the annual dinner in colonial 
costume. 

Washington's Birthday. 

Fourth Year Academy class presents "Mr. Bob." 

Seniors present 'Talking Pictures," 



ALUMNAE NOTES. 

We were sorry to hear of the death of Mrs. Andrus. 

Page Sixteen 



li 




Cfje CoUcge Greetings; 




We were very glad to receive the many subscriptions 
for the February number of the Greetings. 

The paper written by Mrs. E. J. B. Harris, which con- 
tains a good account of the college fire in 1 869, cannot be 
published this month on account of lack of space. We 
hope, however, to give it to our readers in a short time. 



CHAFING DISH RECIPES. 

Pigs in Blankets (Oysters and Bacon). 

Wash and wipe oysters and wrap a thin slice of bacon 
around each. Fasten with tooth-picks. Put in a hot 
frying-pan and cook until brov/n and crisp. Remove the 
tooth-picks and serve. 

Egg Vermicelli. 



I T Butter 

I T Flour 

I cup Milk 

3 hard cooked Eggs 

Parsley 

Seasoning 

Toast 



Prepare white sauce by melting butter and adding 
flour, then gradually add the milk and cook until it thick- 
ens. Chop the whites of the eggs and add to white sauce. 
Season to taste. Spread on toast and grate yolks over all. 




HOME ECONOMICS. 

During the fall months the first year class in House- 
hold Science made a study of carbohydrates, analyzing 
different vegetables and cereals and taking up the study of 

Page Seventeen 




^f)t CoUege (^rcetingg 



sugar. Protein has been the subject of study since the 
beginning- of the year. Milk and eggs were the first foods 
to be analyzed during the study of protein foods. 

Classes in sewing and cooking have been formed for 
girls. They are taught by the senior students in those 
subjects. 

Sales of foods prepared in the regular classes have 
begun for the purpose of adding needed furnishings to the 
department dining room. 

During the latter part of January Fern Lippincott was 
unable to attend her classes on account of illness. 

^^ 
EXPRESSION NOTES. 

The girls in the Expression Department are now 
working on the Irish play "Arrah-Na-Pogue," which is to 
be given March 17 as a celebration for St. Patrick's Day. 

Every Friday afternoon at 4:15 in the Expression 
hall the criticism classes are being held. Only the stu- 
dents in the department attend. However, beginning with 
February 2 7 there will be a series of three afternoon reci- 
tals in the Music Hall to which everyone is invited. 

Among the series of popular readings given at four 
o'clock Thursday afternoons at the Public Library are Miss 
Allen's "Hero Worship" (from Carlyle) on March 12; 
on April 9, "Hero as Poet"; April 23, "Hero as Priest"; 
May 7, "Hero as Man of Letters"; and May 14, "Hero as 
King." As one of the evening lectures Miss Editha Par- 
sons will present "Polly of the Circus" on February 24. 




Everyone enjoyed the artistic recital given by Direc- 
tor and Mr. Swarthout on January the twenty-sixth. 

The teachers' training class has been organized by 

Page Eighteen 




Cfje CoUege ^reettngsf 



Mr. Donald M. Swarthout, with an enrollment of five, and 
had its first meeting February thirteenth. 

Miss Harriet Walker, who was graduated from the 
voice department in 1911, spent the v/eek end with friends 
Sunday, February eighth. 

Miss Helen Jones, a senior in voice in the College of 
Music, sang very effectively on the Day of Prayer, Steb- 
bin's "In the Secret of His Presence." 

Miss Beebe, a teacher of voice in the College of 
Music, is singing regularly in the Grace Church choir. She 
also gave a Schubert recital for the History of Music class, 
February thirteenth. 

^? 
ART DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

On February ninth Mr. Edward Howard Griggs of 
New York gave two lectures on the Artists' Course. His 
afternoon subject was "The Meaning and Function of 
Sculpture and Painting." Those present had a very un- 
usual privilege in hearing from a man of such universal 
culture the place and inspiration that the major arts of 
sculpture, painting, music and poetry hold in life and what 
they mean for enrichment and beauty. 

In the evening Mr. Griggs' subject was "Art for Life's 
Sake," the keynote of which was the statement that one 
should have art in life — not for adornment's sake, not for 
technique's sake, but art for life's sake, art for the fuller 
enrichment of the spirit. Mr. Griggs has the power of 
carrying his audience with him all through his address and 
of drawing pictures of the great art and productions of the 
ages, suffused with the atmosphere of their creation. 

It was a great privilege to have Mr. Griggs with us, 
and it was the universal hope that he might come again 
next year. 

Among the new students enrolled the second semester 
in the School of Fine Arts we notice the following: 
Juanita Bare, Blanche Day, Josephine Knewitz, Lura Wis- 

Page Nineteen 




^f)t CoUege (^reetingg 



well, Phyllis Wilkinson, Lillie Lind, Lucile Bundy, LaVone 
Patrick and Elda Noll. 

Beulah Erixon has concluded to take the full art 
course leading to graduation. 

A recent letter from Ruth Miller says she will be able 
to return to work in the near future. 

Miss Knopf is represented again this year at the Chi- 
cago Artists' Exhibition, being held during February at the 
Chicago Art Institute. 

Sketch Class has been doing some interesting poses, 
namely: Julia Stuckey, Ruth Mattocks, Mildred Barton, 
Marion Newlin, Phyllis Wilkinson, Blanche Day, Catherine 
Long and Flora Miller. 

Peril Hess and Dorothy Stevens are working on the 
Annual illustrations. 

PHI NU. 

Phi Nu has had two jolly chafing dish parties in the 
hall. One shortly after our Christmas vacation and the 
other the Saturday night following examination week. 
Nothing could have been more informal or more fun. 
Everyone was set to making "rabbit" or toasting bread. 
Serving was decidedly on the cafeteria plan, and what if 
some of the "bunny" did seem a little inclined to run, 
examinations were over and little things no longer mat- 
tered. Later we pulled taffy until our arms were tired 
and our thumbs blistered, but worry was forgotten and the 
creamy sticks of candy were compensation for blisters. 

Phi Nu's jolly Valentine sleighride was quite as much 
fun as the chafing dish parties. We started at seven, with 
Miss Mothershead as chaperone. It was an ideal night 
and we were so busy finding room for our arms and feet 
that we didn't have time to get cold. 

A truly successful party must have surprises and ours 
came in the guise of a cinder bed into which the drivers 
turned. Fortunately it was only half a block from Erma 
Elliott's. We all piled out and went there to get warm. 
Hot oyster soup helped in this thawing process, and by the 

Page Twenty 







time we were all warm the sleigh was ready and v/e sang 
our way homeward. 

BELLES LETTRES. 

Two new members, Helen Ost and Ora Theobald, 
were pledged to Belles Lettres at the regular meeting on 
Tuesday, February the tenth. During the past month the 
following old members were back with us for short visits: 
Miss Mona Summers from Depaw University, Miss Harriet 
Walker of Joplin, Missouri, and Miss Lois Coultas from the 
University of Illinois. Miss Coultas will take her master's 
degree there this year. 

For this semester's work we have taken up the study 
of the Modern American Drama. Very interesting pro- 
grams have been planned, with reviews of different plays, 
the development and different phases of the drama, the 
theater and its actors. 

THETA SIGMA SOCIETY. 

The Theta Sigma Society has welcomed the following 
new members: Alice Birch, Gretchen Franken and Louise 
Strong. 

Miss Floy Newlin, who attended school here last year, 
came Saturday, February the fourteenth, for a short visit. 

Saturday evening, the members of the Theta Sigma 
Society went out to Annie Floreth's to celebrate Valen- 
tine's Day in a jolly manner. Miss Newlin being with us 
again for the first time this year. There was pop-corn, all 
anyone would want, after which came the "taffy pull." 
During the evening games were played and stunts of vari- 
ous kinds were performed. 

LAMBDA MU NOTES. 

Lambda Alpha Mu enjoyed having Miss Mildred Wol- 
fers present at one of its meetings last month. During the 
program Miss Wolfers read several selections from a book 



Page Twenty-one 




Ci)e CoQege ({greetings; 



of her own poems which she had previously presented to 
the society. 

Lambda Mu received three new members during the 
past month: Misses Melba Anderson, Wilma Cox and 
Pauline Hermann. 

The society play, "The Betty Wales Girls and Mr. 
Kidd," was presented in Music Hall February sixteenth. 
The plot of the play is taken from the well-known book, 
"Betty Wales, Junior." Betty with several of her friends 
invent a girl to mystify the college. Mary Brooks, a sen- 
ior, discovers the joke and turns the tables. 

The cast of characters was: 

Betty Wales — Grace Heller. 

Helen Chase Adams — Mary Louise Witbeck. 

Madeline Ayres — Naomi Davis. 

Mary Brooks — Mary Shastid. 

Babbie Hildred — Lucile Reinbach. 

Bob Parker — Mary Harrison. 

Babe Henderson — Eloise Williams. 

Roberta Lewis — Helen DeWitt. 

Miss Priscilla Hicks — Ruth Want. 

Georgiana Arms — Helena Munson. 

The real Georgia Ames — Ola Wendel. 



ACADEMEA NOTES. 

Thursday evening, February twelfth, Academea 
pledged three new girls. Marguerite Watson, Pauline Jones 
and Mary Cozart. The members are very glad to wel- 
come them into the society. 

February tenth, after a regular meeting, we had a 
taffy pull in Expression Hall to celebrate the anniversary 
of the first meeting of the society. 

The first framed poster from the Art Department 
was one which announced a meeting of Academea. 

Page Twenty-two 




tli)t College ^vtttinQi 




EXCHANGES. 

'The Francis Shimer Record" has an exceptionally 
good alumnae department under the heading of "The 
Scattered Family." The November number also contains 
several good bits poetry. 

"The Pegasus" could be improved by the addition of 
a distinctly literary department and the use of a few cuts. 

Class of 1 9 1 4 — Class. 

Class of 191 5 — Gas. 

Class of 1916 — Brass. 

Class of 1917 — Grass. — Ex. 

"The Greetings" thanks some of our exchanges for 
the information sent at our request. 

The article "Illinois College Men in Public Life" 
shows that Illinois College has a right to be proud of her 
past. We congratulate the Rambler for thus keeping in 
touch with the history of the college. 

The February number of "The Western Oxford" is 
exceptionally good. The Junior class might well include 
in their poem, "Alediaeval and Modern History," that they 
had also a talent for writing both prose and poetry. 

The article on "College Efficiency," which appears 
in the February number of "The Carthage Collegian," is 
both interesting and instructive. 



Page Twenty-three 



^iHiiMiiiiiiiiirnintiiiiMHiiiimiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMriiiiiiiiitiiiiiniiiiinitiiiiinMiiHiiiniiinniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiii^ 

I THE TWENTY DEPARTMENTS in our store are 

I just like twenty little stores, every one devoted to 

I the sale and display of articles FOR THE Modern 

I Woman's wear. 

I Each Department makes a determined and successful 

I effort to show first the ATTRACTIVE NEW STYLES 

[ OF THE SEASON. You'll find shopping- pleasant 

I here. 



Kid Gloves 
Neckwear 
Fabric Gloves 
Linen 

White Goods 
Notions 
Laces and 

Embroideries 



Corsets 

Art Goods 

Petticoats 

Handkerchiefs 

Ribbons 

Toilet Goods 

Jewelry and 



Knit Underwear 
Hosiery 

Children's Wear 
Muslin Underwear 
and Waists 
Coats and Suits 
Dresses 



Leather 



iS^i^ 'i^ <^' ■<# ^;SSS#^ «SSSSSSS!^" ^!«^^SSsi :SSSiSSSsl 5>*\««S^ '^>SSf-'<^SS!8^ 

LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 




FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

Footwear for ail occasions — 
Street Shoes 

Dress Slippers 

Bed-room Slippers 

h: o IP :e^ E] lE^. s' 

We Repair Shoes 



I J. A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER 



I THE COLLEGE STORE 

I Pennants, Stationer}^ Tennis Goods, Drug-s, School 

I Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory 

I Books and Photo Albums 

I "PlyEASED customers" — OUR MOTTO 

I Goods Delivered 

I Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St. and Square 

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Otto Speith 

pboto portraiture 



Our Portraits were accepted and hung at the National Convention 
in Kansas City 1913 



Formerly Watson Studio 



Southwest Corner Square 



4 



|\ PRESS /| 



Goto 
MULLENIX & HAMILTON 

For EverytMiig Sweet 

Hot and Cold Sodas 

216 East state Street 



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Coover & Shrevel 

Have a complete line of 

Drugs, Kodaks, Perfumes, 
Stationery and Holiday Gifts! 

We do Developing- & Printin 

East and West Side Square 



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I The most dainty things in Rings and Jewelry. 

I New and handsome styles of goods in Sterling Silver 

I Highest grades of Cut Glass, and every 

I description of Spectacles and E^ye Glasses 

I Fine Diamonds a Specialty 

I a-t 

I RUSSELL & LYON'S 

i The Oldest Established Jewelry House in Central Illinois 

I West Side Square 

I Both Phones 96 



I Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say 

I We can furnish your 

I Shoes and Party Slippers 

I in the popular styles, 

I leathers, and 

I fabrics 



All the Faculty, Students and Friem 
of the College should have a. Checkii 
or Savings Account with 

F. G. FARRELL & C( 

BANKERS 

F. E. Farrell, President 

E. E. Crabtree, Vice-President 

H. H. Potter, Cashier 

M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier 



While Dr. Marker was visiting in an out-of-town min- 
ister's home last Sunday, he met a five-year-old who was 
very much interested in his "family," She began by 
asking, 

"Have you any little girls? " 

"Yes, several," answered President Marker. 

"How many? " 

"Well, how many do you think? " 



Concern 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAL. OCCASIONS 



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For those who discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to 
please the students who come to our city. We select only the 
best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. 

Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 
Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 
College functions. 

Vickery & Merrigan 

227 West State Street 



Both Phones 309 



SAFEST PLACE TO TRADE 

f(lLLERBY'§ 

DRY GOODS STORE 



West Side Square 



Brady Bros. | 



Everything in Hardware and! 
Paints I 



shoe!' 



"Four?" 

"No, more than that." 

"Seven?" 

"No, guess again." 

"Well, I don't know. How many have you? " 

"Oh, about two hundred." 

"My! You must be the old man that lived in the 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . $2cx),ooo 
Surplus . . 34,OQO 

Deposits , . . 1,100,000 

U. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 

Julius B. Strawn, President 
Chas. B. Graff, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear 

H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

J. R. Robertson 

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jACKSOMVILLg, /jX* 

Established 1890 

Low Prices Square Dealing' 
Keep us busy 

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I 
S 

i Coats, Suits and Skirts tailored to your individual 

I measure and form at 

i POPULAR PRICES 



All work made in our own shop by expert workmen, 
g-uarantee to fit you. 



We 



JACKSONVILLE TAILORING COMPANY 



233 East State Street 



Opposite Pacific Hotel 



Edna B. — "I dreamed last night that my cousin died 
of blue vitriol." 



IHARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

I Designs, Cut Flowers, 
I Plants 

I Southwest Corner Square 

i Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

i Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

I Greenhouses, Bell 775 

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McGINNIS' 

The Yoongf Ladies' Shoe Store 

See the "BABY DOLL SHOE. 
It's the Latest. 

We carry a full line of Bvening Slippc 
in all colors. 

If it's new, we have it 

JAS. McGINNIS & OC 

Bast Side Square 
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Want 

Cut flowers 



F 
E 

R 

N 



FROM 



JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 



Both Phones 



Classy Styles 
s will be pleased to show you our line 

FROST & NOLLEY 

^ashionabie Footwear 

For All Occasions 
( South Side Sq. Jacksonville, 111. 



Job Printing f 

Of All Kinds I 

s 
s 

John K* Long I 

Engraved Cards and Invitations I 



213 West Morgan Street! 
Illinois Phone 400 | 



L. I, — "Well, Peril, you're not the only one that has 
been taken for thirty. Someone thought I was thirty, too." 
F. H. — "Whew! You beat me two years!" 



Dorwart Market 

ALIv KINDS OF 

IrESH and SALT MEATS 
FISH, POULTRY, E)tc. 

ioth phones 196 230 W. State St. 

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KODAK FINISHING | 

Vulcan Roll Films f 

Cameras from $2.00 up | 

Kverything- strictly first class | 

Vail & Vail | 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. | 

5 
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PHOTOGRAPHER 



I Successor to McCullougfh Bros. 



East Side Square 



i Cameras, Films, Papers, 

I Photo Supplies for Kodakers 
p^erelopingft Printings and Mounting 

I at reasonable prices 

I Armstrongs Drug Store 

r 

I South West Corner Square 



S. S. Kresge Co 

5c & IOC Store 

New and Up-to-Date 



The Linotyper's comment on "The College Woman 
in Journalism" in the February Greetings — "When you're 
teaching those college girls how to write for a newspaper, 
tell them to learn to use the typewriter." 

H. M. — "How often have you and your roommate 
slept through lately? " 

R. W. — "Well, we never both slept together twice at 
once before." 



ipIPE YOUR HOUSE FOR 

3 

I lacksonville Railway 
I and Light Co* 

s 

I 224 S. Main Street 



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H. J. & h. M. SMITH 

Art Needle Work 
and Millinery 

211 West state Street 



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INXECSFRITY I 

7c have built op our GROCERY and DRUG Departments on a solid! 
)undation of INTEGRITY. In our GROCERY and DRUGS WM 
AY WHAT WE BELIEVE, and our customers BELIEVE WHAT| 
TE SAY. Every item in our store is an example of PURE FOOD,! 
LEAN FOOD, GOOD FOOD and BEST DRUGS. I 

|>URS is a GROCERY AND DRUG STORE with a CONSCIENCEJ 

hone, 800 I^QIBIBEyTS BI^OS. Phones 800| 

Grocery—Pharmacy | 

29 South Side Sq. | 



Vc Sell 

hoenix Guaranteed 

Silk Hosiery 




a/wiond 



DRY GOODS STORE 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 | 

A. L. Bromley | 

Ladies' Tailor j 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and | 
Repairing. Ladies' Man Tail- I 
ored Suits to order. Remodeling | 
of ail kinds. Special rates to | 
I. W. C. students. All work | 
called for and delivered promptly I 



F. H. (after snow storm) — "Dr. Marker, did you ever 
make angels? " 

Dr. H. — "1 have tried for a long time but I don't 
know that I have succeeded." 

Miss N. — "I was on the verge of using a slangish ex- 
pression." 



111. Phone 57 



Bell Phone 92 



Fresh Drug's, 
Fancy Goods 
Stationerv 



THE 



Badfler Dryo 5t.or6 

2 doors Weal of PostoflBce 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



235 E. Stete Street 

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It will pay you to visit 

SCHRAM'S 

Jewelry Store 

COLLEGE PINS, RINGS, SPOONS, ETC. 



Len G. Magill 
Printer 

Bast State Street 111. Phone 418 



T AYLOR'S 

Grocery 

A g-ood place to trade 
221 West State Street 



A. M. — "What examinations do you have? " 
E. B. — "i go from Zoology to Chemistry — from rack 
to ruin!" 



Montgomery & Deppe 

IN THEIR NEW PLACE ON THE WEST SIDE OP 

THE SQUARE ARE SHOWING 

EVERYTHING IN 

Dry Goods and Ready-to-Wear Garments 

Telephone for the Fall Catalogue 



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College Jewelrv 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 

Chafing Dishes, Copper and Brass Goods 

Special Die Stationery 

21 South Side Square 



One block east of College 

HERE TO PLEASE 

Candies Cakes 

Cookies Pies 

Sandwiches Pop on Ice 

Groceries California Fruits 
School Supplies 




BROTHER^ 



Jacksonville's foremost Men's Store | 

Mackinaw and Sweater Coats| 

Mannish Cut and Form Fitting | 

Hand Bags, Suit Cases and | 
Trunks | 

I. W. C. Banners and Pillowsl 

SPECIAL DESIGNS ON REQUEST I 



Heard in English 2- 



'Now, for instance, when I be- 
gan to take Latin, I had to make out my own vocabulary, 
which consisted of simple things, such as things to eat, as 
salt, sugar, bread, rats, etc." 



Ladies' Late Style Sweater 
Coats 



Are Sold by 



Frank Byrns 



Hat 
Store 



C.S.MARTIN 

Wall Pape^r, Painting 

and Interior Decorating 

Pictures and Frames 

314 W. state St., Scott Block 
Jacksonville, 111. 



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Cafe 



Confectionary 



Kbcacock fun 



I Catering- 



Soda 



Candies 



I SKIRT BOXES 

j ROCKERS. SCREENS, 

3 

I DESKS AND 

I EED ROOM CURTAINS 

I 

I AT 

I 

jJohnson, Hackett & Guthrie 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



fCoIIcgc Girls 

I Who Admire 

s 

I " atylish made Clothes should 

I vi»it the new 

I Royal Ladies* Tailors 

i Opposite Post Office on East State St. 

|You will find here such made clothes as 
|are only seen in metropolitian centers. 



SHOES 



SLIPPERS 



The only Popular Price Shoe Store 

in the city 

The only Shoe Store catering tc 

special orders 

The newest shoes for the least 

money 

JOHNSON BROS. 

Under Farrell's Bank W. State & Sq. 



SHEET MUSIC, MUSIC MERCHANDISE 

TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 

AND SUPPLIES 

19 SOUTH SIDB PUBWC SQUARE 



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i J. BART JOHNSON 

Everything Musical 

PIANOS, PLAYKR PIANOS, VICTROLAS, 

IMPORTE)R OF VIOLINS, AND A COMPLE^TEi 

LINE OF MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 

[9 South Side Square 



I. Ai^BYN LiNcoiyN Adams 

Oculist and Aurist 
to the State School for the Blind 

323 West State Street 



Practice limited to diseases of the 
Bye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



DR. ALPHA B. APPLEBEE 

s 

Dentist i 

326 West State St. 1 



P. G. (in Latin Composition) — "Why do you put 
'esse' in that sentence? I wrote 'sein.' " 

G. J. — "One year there was an episode of mumps 
in our town." 

E. B. — "Quite an episode, wasn't it? 



DR. BYRON S. GAILEY 

EYE, EAR, 
NOSE AND THROAT 



0£Bce and Residence 
340 West State Street 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 

Jno. B. Snell, Prop. 

Rates $2. 25, I2.50, and $3.00 per day 

One Block West of Woman's College 
Opposite Post Office 
Rooms with or without bath 
Local and Long Distance Telephone 
in every room. 



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l*-^. 



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I i pfli 

= • - ' («i .rl \j..^-;i^«^| 




Andre & Andre 

Ever3'thin*r in 

High Grade House Furnishin 

for Everybody, Everywhere 
46-50 North Side Square 



1 




E. A. SCHOEDSACK 


i 
i 

1 


CAFE BATZ 

And Annex for Ladies 

221-223 East State Street 


Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 


ilUinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 


230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111. 


r 




Illinois Phone 388 



iii 



Miss B. — "Give Franklin's life." 

M. G. — "I don't know when he died." 

Fritz — "I tore my kimono again." 

"You surely are going through that kimono." 

Fritz — "Huh! Do you think I could get through that 
hole?" 






I Florence Kirk King 
I Hair Dresser 

I special Service in Shampooing 
I Scalp Treatment, Manufacturing 
I Hair into I^atest Styles 
I Work done by appointment 
I 111. Phone 837 503 W. College St. 



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Cherry's Livery 

Finest Light and Heav 
Livery 
Lowest Rates 

235-237, 302-304-306 North Main Stre( 



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jirlst Patronize our Advertisers I 



Ayers National Bank 

Fottnded 1852 



Capital 

;^200,ooo 

Surplus 

^S0,000 




Deposits 

y5l,2SO,000 

United States 
Depository 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 

Special Window for Ladies 
Ladies' Waiting- Room 
We make a feature of Ladies' Accounts, and have 
provided facilities for their exclusive use 



OFFICERS 

I. F. Dunlap, President O. F. Buffe, Cashier 

.ndrew Russel, Vice President R. C. P.evnolds, Asst. Cashier 

L M. Hockenhull, Vice President H. C, Clement, Asst. Cashier 

C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 



•wen P. Thompson 
;dward F. Goltra 
Dhn W. Iveach 



DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhull 
M. F. Dunlap 



Harrv M. Capps 
O. F." Buffe 
Andrew Russel 



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IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUllllll- 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEG 

College of Liberal Arts 

(Fall classical and scientific courses) 

College of Music 

School of Fine Arts 

School of Expression 

School of Home Economics 

4I,A Standard College — one of the best. 
Regular college and academy courses 
leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 
inently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located 
in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 
dignified, old college town, noted for 
its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking for- a good college. 

Call or address, Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, 111. 




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l^fje College (greetings! 

in The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
Ijl Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They arc due 
the twentieth of each month. 

€j] Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
€|f Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



Contents 

April Fool's Day 3 

Fairies 4 

Birds 5 

Editorials 6 

Catullus '84 6 

•"Tis Always Thus" 7 

"A Search" 8 

"When the Fuse Burned Out" 10 

"Dishes" 10 

"The Town Girls' Burden" 11 

"Living up to Bells" 13 

The Faculty Song 14 

"Then" 14 

"We're Glad We're Freshmen" 16 

Y. W. C. A 18 

Phi Nu 19 

Lambda Mu . 19 

Acadamea 20 

Music Notes 20 

Home Economics 21 

Endowment Statement 2a 

College Calendar 22 

Fourth Prep. Play 24 

Exchanges 24 

Thb 
Gkaphic Akts 

COKCBRIf 



"Now the noisy winds are still; 

April's coming up the hill! 
All the Spring is in her train. 
Led by shining ranks of rain; 

Pit, pat, patter, clatter. 

Sudden sun and clatter, patter! 

First the blue and then the shower; 

Bursting bud, and smiling flower; 

Brooks set free with tinkling ring; 

Birds too full of song to sing; 

Crisp old leaves astir with pride. 

Where the timid Violets hide, — 

All things ready with a will, — 

April's coming up the hill!" 

— Mary Ma^es Dodge. 



ZLbe College ©reettnQS 



Vol. XVII JacksonTille, 111,, April, 1914 No. 7 

APRIL FOOL'S DAY. 

The term, April Fool's Day, was given to the first 
day of April in allusion to the custom of playing practical 
jokes or sending people on fool's errands on that day. 

The origin of this custom is much disputed. One of 
the alleged origins arose from the farcical commemoration 
of Christbeing sent from Annas to Caiaphas,from Caiaphas 
to Pilate, from Pilate to Herod, and from Herod back to 
Pilate, the crucifixion taking place about the first of April, 

It seems certain, though, that formerly universal festi- 
vities were held at the vernal equinox, beginning about 
the twenty-fifth of March and ending with the first day of 
April. The chief amusement of the people was in fooling 
their friends. It is interesting to find that the Hindoos 
have a similar festival which terminates the last day of 
March, 

It has been plausibly suggested that Europe got the 
day from the French, France was the first nation to 
adopt the reformed calendar, Charles IX decreed that 
all festivities usually accompanying April first should be 
transferred to January first. Those who disliked the 
change made mock gifts and paid calls of pretended cere- 
mony on April first. 

Various countries apply different names to April Fool's 
Day. In Scotland they have the custom of "hunting the 
gowk," and April fools are known as April gowks. The 
word "gowk" means cuckoo — a term of contempt. In 
France the April fool is known as "poisson d' avril." 

Page Three 




tS^ College ^ttttinqi 




..•III 



The first of April will soon be here, and let us remem- 
ber that throughout the world that day is set aside as the 
practical jokers' own day. 

Edna Robb, '16. 

FAIRIES. 

It was late in the evening on one of those smouldering 
August days. Little Johnie could not sleep. He sat up 
in bed and looked anxiously out into the calm, silent night. 
The full moon was beautiful, casting long, weird shadows 
on the lawn. Close by the hedge, lay motionless, the 
garden hose. It looked almost snake-like lying there. 
Johnie could not help thinking of the fairy stories his sis- 
ter had told him when she put him to bed. He was won- 
!![| dering now if there really were fairies. Just then he 

'ih thought he saw a beautiful one, gliding softly across the 

I lawn to where the hose lay. She was beautifully gOAvned, 

I ' " in misty white, which flowed about her in the old Grecian 

'I way. Her hair was light and shone like gold in the moon- 

1' light. By this time Johnie was out of bed and by the win- 

dow. He always wanted to see fairies and now he scarcely 
realized what was before him. He gazed more and more 
intently and was almost sure he saw her lift the hose and 
begin sprinkling the lawn and flower beds. First he saw 
her by the roses, she seemed to be talking with them, and 
a minute later was drowning the very ones, until they 
nodded their heads with sufficiency. She did this to other 
parts of the garden and finally when her task was com- 
pleted, she vanished as she came, into space. Little 
Johnie sat dazed. He realized the atmosphere had be- 
come much cooler. Was it because of the fairy or the 
water? Surely he was not dreaming. He was wide 
awake and sitting by the window. He waited for the fairy 
to reappear but she did not. Looking longingly out of 
the window upon the garden, little Johnie turned to his 
bed. He would be sure in the morning if the fairy were 

Page Four 



Wtit College Greetings: 



really there or not. The grass and bushes would prove 
it to him. With this thought he went to sleep. On 
awakening he looked once more out of the window and 
anxiously called his mother to dress him. Then running 
across the lawn and seeing the bushes he discovered them 
to be really damp. He wasn't a bit surprised. For 
hadn't he seen a really, truly, fairy the night before? 

Flora Mueller, '20. 

THE BIRDS. 

Whether or not we have been conscious of their com- 
ing, the birds are again making their presence known 
about us. The shortest walk cannot be taken without 
seeing a robin bobbing his saucy head as he runs along 
before us, a little brown creeper going up a tree, or a tiny 
nuthatch slipping down. The blackbirds fill the trees 
with their twitter, the kinglets and juncoes flit along the 
hedges. The song of the lark comes uncertainly from 
the fields, the flying bluebird catches the rays of the sun- 
light. 

The winter residents are aroused by the home com- 
ing. Noisily they cry their welcome. The crows, the 
bluejays, make much more commotion than when they 
were among the majority of our feathered friends. Even 
the dusty little sparrows frisk about more gayly, less ready 
to accept the proffered feast of crumbs on the window- 
ledge. The cardinal in his shining plumage calls out his 
thankfulness for the return of spring from the tipmost top 
of trees. The steady honk, honk of the wild geese pro- 
claims it spring indeed. 



Page Five 



j^HB 



[IJ^Il tf lie CoOege ^reeting^ MO 

PACUI.TY CoMMiTTBB — Miss Motherthead, Mies Baker, Mies 

Johnston. 
Bditor— Abbie P«avoy 

AS60CIATB EDiTORa — Erma Elliott, Helena Mnnson, Helen licGhee 
BnsiNBSt Manaobrs — Geneva Upp, Winifred Bnrmeiater, Alma 

Harmel 



EDITORIALS. 

The May Greetings is to be "class" number. Con- 
tributions of some kind are solicited from every class. 
Poems, editorials, stories, news items will be accepted. 
No prizes are offered but the best contribution will receive 
recognition. Class presidents, this is a matter for you to 

lIV look after. See that your class is represented by the con- 

'M tribution of some member. 

The Greetings staff is very sorry to receive the resig- 
nation of Helen McGhee, whose election to the Y. W. C. 
A. cabinet gives her more points than is permitted her to 
carry according to the regulations of the evaluating com- 
mittee's decision. 



The paper on the Winged Victory in last Greetings 
was written by Ruth Harper, '17. 



CATULLUS, 84. 

Our Arrius used to say happropriate 

Whenever he wanted just appropriate, 

And hambush for ambush quite pleased him, no doubt, 

Especially when it had come with a shout. 

His mother, his uncle, the free one, I mean. 

His grandpa, his grandma, this same way did lean. 

Then Syria promised a rest to our ears 

For he had been sent there to stay a few years. 

Our ears heard the same words, but softly and low, 

Page Six 




^tie College ^reetinstf 



With never a fear that they'd hear them just so, 
When sudden the horrible news came back 
That Arrius saw what he thought was a lack 
And waves which rejoiced in the Ionian name 
Had yielded it up to Hionian fame. 

Louise Harries, '15. 

" 'TIS ALWAYS THUS." 

"Neither a borrower nor a lender be. 
For loan oft loses both itself and friend, 
And borrowing- dulls the edge of husbandry." 

— Shakespere. 

"We're going to have a spread to-night," announced 
Edith, as she rushed into the room, and deposited a pile 
of books upon her already crowded desk. Her room- 
mate did not look up from her studying, but asked ab- 
sently, "Oh, are we? And are we going to have some- 
thing to eat?" 

"Of course we'll have eats," declared Edith. "Madge, 
you're always so practical. What's the use of worrying 
when entertaining is such a very simple matter. You 
know I got a cake from home this morning, and — why, 
there are just lots of things we can have. I planned it 
all out in class when I should have been listening to that 
lecture. 1 happened to see some of the girls after class, 
so invited them then." 

"And how many did you invite, if you please," in- 
quired Madge. 

"Let me see, with us 1 believe there are ten alto- 
gether." 

"My goodness, Edith, you don't mean to say you've 
invited ten people to eat one small cake!" 

"Oh, but I expect to have lots more. We'll make 
fudge and tea and — " 

"Do you realize that our supply of silver and china 

Page Seven 




Q^fie College ^reettngis 




has been diminished by our friends who borrow and fail 
to return them, until now we have exactly three saucers 
and two spoons? " 

'That's a small matter. I can borrow in return and 
I'll try to borrow from the same ones who have come to 
us before, and then I can forget to return them. I'll 
start in now," and Edith hurried out of the room. 

Presently she returned, her arms full of her spoils. 
Setting the dishes down on the table, she said. "Out of 
the ten plates I borrowed, four happened to be ours. I 
don't believe the girls realized it, either. Everybody had 
cups and spoons they'd give me, so you see it was an easy 
matter." 

"Remember that your chafing-dish burner is broicen, 
and that our last clean lunchcloth had fudge spilled on it 
the other night," reminded Madge. 

"I'll borrow Mary's chafing dish, it's better looking 
than mine, anyway, and of course she'll let me have a 
lunch cloth." 

"You'd better see if there is any alcohol left in the 
bottle," persisted Madge. 

"Not a drop," cheerfully answered Edith scrutinizing 
the empty bottle. "But Betty got some yesterday when 
1 was with her, so I know I can get it from her." 

Alice Tombaugh, '17. 

A SEARCH. 

(A moving picture plot). 
Grace sitting in her room conceives a grand idea for 
a stunt that has to be given that evening. The sun 
streams through the windows; her clock on the "mantle" 
points to ten minutes of nine. She rushes to Beulah's 
room with her scheme, but finding no one there slips a 
note under the door. Her face shows that she is not sur- 
prised to find the room empty as she starts for a room 
down the corridor. On the way she meets a Freshman 

Page Eight 




tSift CoUege 6reeting< 




and asks if she has seen Beulah. She receives as an 
answer a reverent and polite, "No ma'am." As she 
reaches the door she knocks vigorously and enters the 
room in almost the same instant. Here she is told that 
Beulah has been there, but has just gone to the library. 
Her face lights up with hope. She is urged to stay, but 
no, she must find Beulah while she can locate her. As 
Grace is seen coming down the stairs Beulah disappears 
around the corner. 

Beulah's errand takes her to the botany laboratory 
and then directly to her room where she finds the note. 
She follows much the same course to find Grace that 
Grace did to find her. At each place she is told that 
Grace is looking for her and where she was last seen. In 
the front hall the Freshman rushes up to her with that 
happy radiance which comes only when a Freshman can 
do an upper classman a favor, shining all over her face, 
exclaiming, "Grace is looking all over for you, I saw her 
just a second ago in the Greetings office." With a 
dawning look of hope Beulah starts for the Greetings 
office. The disappearing elevator lifts her long sought 
friend out of sight just as she comes to the official win- 
dow. 

Grace leaves the elevator on her home floor, goes to 
her room, and throws herself on the bed exhausted. A 
few minutes later the Freshman finds her here. Her 
message this time is that she has seen Beulah in the front 
hall. Grace hurries down the stairs not wiling to wait 
for the elevator which as it Tiappens carries Beulah up as 
Grace goes down. The chase is on again in full force 
when the chapel bell rings. Among the ten o'clock 
crowd in the front hall the two girls spy each other. They 
rush into one another's arms, the light of success after a 
long struggle on their faces. 

Helena Munson, '15. 



Page Nine 




^te CoUes^ #reeting£( 




WHEN THE FUSE BURNED OUT. 

It was nine-seventeen! A most tragic hour for such 
an occurrence with lessons to get or to finish, party dresses 
to be folded away and hair to be put up for the night, 
but, how did we know that it would happen, or how were 
we to blame? "Roomie" was positively famished and 
I was only going to make her some toast. The first piece 
was splendid, just brown and crisp enough to whet my 
appetite and to cause the whole sad incident. 

"Funny this bread doesn't brown," I exclaimed after 
a few minutes. 

"Maybe you turned the current off," suggested my 
roommate." Turn it on again and see." I turned, but still 
the toaster did not redden; I pulled out the toaster and 
connected it again; I turned the switch and was just trying 
to make the connection over again, which my roommate 
called, "Come in!" 

Come in! and they came. There was the girl with 
a mouth full of hair pins and kid curlers, the girl with a 
besmeared letter, the girl with a Latin book, the girl 

with pan and spoon, and even Miss in her exclusive 

red kimona. All came in, took one look and then let 
loose. 

"I simply can't finish this letter! I can't make this 
cocoa. I can't finish up my hair," and even the one in 
the red kimona exclaimed in disgust "Girls, are you using 
a toaster? " 

Then from over the transom came such cries of dis- 
tress, calls for candles, threats and ejaculations against 
us, that we, rather than venture out, valiantly quenched 
our thirst and went quietly to bed. 

Lucille McCloud, '16. 
>? 
DISHES. 

"We simply must wash those dishes" you say to your 
room mate on Monday morning as you view the remains 

Page Ten 




Q^e CoOege ^rtetingf 




of Saturday night's frivolity, yes and probably Sunday 
night's too. "Why we haven't a clean dish to our 
names." 

"What's the use?" is her indifferent reply "Let's 
leave them until later." Ordinarily you would feel the 
same way about it but today you have the desire to be 
immaculate. 

"No," you say sternly, "If we leave them now we 
never will do them," and laden with dishes you start to- 
ward the sink, followed by "Roomy," who peacefully 
swings the towel. 

Once there you proceed to drench yourself as well as 
the dishes. Perhaps you break two or three but that is no 
occasion for sadness; — just that much less to wash next 
time. 

Phyllis Wilkinson, '17. 



THE TOWN GIRLS' BURDENS. 

At I. W. C. when the day's work's o'er 

For the home girls there is a treat in store 

They feel that they can have some fun 

When that glad 4:1 5 has come 

They mingle their voices in happy tone 

But the town girl rejoices that she can go home 

She unearths her wraps from the hall tree stack 

And joyfully takes the homeward track. 

The town girl of course is a very good cook 
And never has time to sit down with her book 
Till after she's fussed around making pies 
Doughnuts and cakes and things good to your eyes 
Then when she has finished up all the chores 
Her lofty ambition through psych and math soars 
And it's thus that these plodders of the soil 
Burn many gallons of midnight oil. 

Page Eleven 




Wbt CoUege ^vntin^s 




At last they seek their weary beds 
To rest the things they call their heads. 
The sober senior, worn with care, 
The jaded juniors, with wits threadbare, 
The saucy sophomores, work all done. 
The frisky freshmen scarce begun. 
Each giving way may clear her brow 
And find some ray of comfort now. 

'^-'-^r at early dawn she'll rise 
Before the stars have left the skies. 
The fires are out, the house is cold. 
Her story sad has oft been told. 
She eats her breakfast from the shelf, 
(For of course she must "sustain" herself). 
While though they wouldn't the fact disclose 
The family continues their calm repose. 

She runs to catch the fleeting car 
And falls on the ice with a frightful jar. 
She hits the pavement with her head 
Coming down kerflop like a load of lead. 
Her hat into the gutter falls. 
As after the car she "sweetly" calls. 
"Hey! stop your car for I have to make 
The Woman's College by five of eight." 

She reaches school in a sorry plight. 

To say the least she is quite a sight. 

Her classmates say, with a shake of the pate, 

"O! that's the girl that's always late." 

Of her French and English she knows none. 

She flunks in her classes one by one, 

While her heartless friends go stalking on 

As calm and tranquil as the dawn. 

O! college girls, in the boarding school. 
Who eat and sleep and breathe by rule, 
Who grind out lessons by the ton, 

ige Twelve 



tS^te College ^xtttin^i 



And shine forth, brilliant as the sun, 
Then roll in flowery beds of ease 
With your feelings towering to the trees, 
Try town girls' life for about a day. 
Then see if you're much better'n they. 

Rose Ransom, '16. 



LIVING UP TO BELLS. 

Only one who has had the experience can fully com- 
prehend the depth of meaning in that phrase. And who 
has had such excellent experience as a girl in college? 
The bell, that ever present, faithful reminder, begins its 
work fifteen minutes before breakfast, when it rudely 
interrupts a pleasant dream, and you awake demanding 
of your roommate whether that is the rising bell or break- 
fast bell. In either case there would be time for another 
nap. That rising bell is cruelly early and the breakfast 
bell, of course, is too late. But upon being informed 
that it is fifteen minutes of seven, there is nothing to do 
but make a wild dash to get down for breakfast. 

Thus the day is started. Several minutes are allowed 
before eight o'clock to prepare for room ins^^e''"'"*'"" 
less your room happened to have been inspe„ j 
— and to finish the math you didn't get last night. Tniee 
classes and an hour of gym for variety fill up the morning, 
allowing five minutes just before lunch to "put in" that 
offensive middy. Perhaps you have a free afternoon — 
free as far as recitations go — but it fairly flies if you take 
a walk, write a letter or two and study a little on the side. 

The dinner bell and bells for study hours follow. 
Then comes "light out," all too soon, it is true, yet most 
welcome to weary brains. How true is the verse, "A 
slave to the bell, a vassal to the hour." 

Elaine Buhrman, 17. 

Page TUirteen 



HZ^ CoOege ^reettngif 00] 

"THE FACULTY SONG." 

(Sung by Faculty, February 18.) 

We once were corridor teachers and on corridor duty bent, 
If you wanted to borrow a pencil or knife, to us for per- 
mission you went. 
We sat with doors wide open and the hallway in full sight, 
We mounted guard at nine-seventeen, and we helped you 
turn out your light ! 
Here's to the corridor teacher and corridor duty, tra-la! 
Study hours and quiet hours, tra-la-la-etc. 
Since Student Government's come along the teacher's 

closed her door, 
She'll not sit up till ten o'clock to gaze your transom o'er! 
She'll study hard for her next degree and early to bed 

she'll go, 
For the proctor is keeping the corridor, and the Faculty's 
glad it's so! 
Hurrah for Student Government, tra-la-la-etc. 
Here's to the Board of Proctors! tra-la-la-etc. 

(To Solomon Levi) 
A Sophomore — "Oh yes! The Faculty will study hard 
and they'll assign harder lessons and we'll have a harder 
time than ever!" 

"THEN." 

Memories of the old days crowd forward — days when 
we were "new girls." How well I remember that 31st 
day of August, 1 866, when my dear father took me to the 
old "1. F. C." and when he said the last goodbye to his 
one little girl and left me, a lorn small figure crouching 
on the lowest step of the great stairway leading up from 
the spacious hall. 

The last year of Dr. Chas. Adams in our college was 
my first year. Even yet I seem to see his intellectual 
face kindly beaming on his "little girls." Of mornings 
Page Fourteen 




tS^t College Greetings; 




he would call off the letters in chapel, and each one for- 
tunate enough to get a letter would go forward and claim 
it. How soon we learned to know the kindly ways. 
We learned too from the naughty wily "old" girls that it 
pleased him as an author when we sought to draw the 
book from the library that he had written telling him of 
our desire to read it at once. We learned too that a cer- 
tain steely gleam of his eyes through his big glasses could 
cause a chilly little tremble. The stately teachers awed us 
by their dignity and store of learning. 

How soon we learned from the "old girls" that when 
all else had failed and the air seemed full of restraint, we 
could flee to dear gentle Mrs. Adams for permissions of 
almost any nature. How beautiful she looked to us! 
But all too soon those above us found out her amiable 
weakness and we were sternly forbidden to ask any favors 
of her. This we felt to be a grief to her and to us. 
Well I remember how one evening several cronies from 
Jersey Co. found it impossible to "do" our mathematics 
without mutual aid in the evening study hour. We all 

roomed on the third floor and Hattie C , Julia S , 

and Jennie S roomed in one big room. My cousin 

Emma D and self (Eunice W ) roomed nearby 

on the same hall. Hattie C , always a leading spirit 

in adventure, prevailed with Mrs. Adams and gained per- 
mission that we spend the night in her room in the interest 
of deepest research. After an evening of some study and 
more refreshment, we arranged several mattresses in a 
row on the floor. Hattie kept a good fire and after re- 
plenishing it very early in the morning, fell asleep. Later 
she found that it was doing even too well for she was 
awakened by the burning bedding as a coal from the 
big sheet iron stove had fallen out and ignited one of our 
beds. Then ensued a fierce but silent fire fight in the 
smothering smoke. Finally five spent and subdued girls 
hardly able to giggle clumped together and whispered joy 
that their peril was over. Two wary ones crept back to 

Page Fifteen 




tB^te CoQege ^reetingtf 




their own cold bed, while the others with busy hands 
cleared away all evidence of our fiery ordeal. When the 
little teacher, Miss Harmon, of our hall who always 
seemed like one of the girls, marched in after "inspection 
bell" all seemed in the usual placid order. However 
later in the morning some one "smelt smoke," but we 
never told a creature. As the old college buildings have 
burned twice since then, and their ashes now no doubt en- 
rich the campus, this late telling can harm none of the 
"old girls." 

At the end of the college year of 1866-1867 our well 
beloved Dr. Adams retired, and was succeeded by the 
scholarly and amiable Dr. DeMotte, who brought to the 
college a delightful family and also a following of new 
pupils, who were lovely and desirable girls from Indiana. 
It interested us greatly to see Dr. DeMotte use the sign 
language, then new to us, in directing his children. He 
could by a slight sign command their attention or obedi- 
ence in such an easy quiet way. This was really char- 
acteristic of the man, ever kind and even tempered but 
forceful and thoughtful. He with many others, both in- 
structors and companions in school, are no longer with us 
save in precious memory. 

Mrs. E. J. B. Harris, 1869. 



WE'RE GLAD WE'RE FRESHMEN. 
I. 

We used to go to chapel 

Every Wednesday night 
But now instead we're gathered here 

To sing with all our might. 
CHORUS 
With the stunts, with the stunts 

We will have a jolly time 
From the playful preps, to faculty, 

We'll all be here in line. 

Page Sixteen 



i 




C^e CoIIese ^reettngiS 




II. 

I wish I were a Senior 

A cap and gown to wear 
Go parading down the corridor 

With a proud and haughty air. 
CHORUS 
My you're smart, my you're wise 

Don't see how you stand the strain 
With privileges rare which others don't share 

It must be hard on your brain. 

III. 

I wish I were a Junior 

I sure do think they're fine 
Just watch them on the 16th of March 

The Seniors they'll outshine. 
CHORUS 
Juniors dear, Juniors dear 

In your footsteps we will follow 
We'll stand by you through thick and thin 

In the essay contest beat 'em all hollow. 

IV. 

I wish I were a Sophomore, 

No studying for them they say. 
To sit around and just look wise, 

That's all they do the live-long day. 

CHORUS 

Yes 'tis true — yes 'tis true 

They don't have to work they say, 
When we were Freshmen, well, I guess we didn't 

— sit around all day. 

V. 

I wish I were a College Spesh 

Taking nothing but music and art, 
They work so hard the live-long day 

But at night they go out on a lark. 

Page Seventeen 




Z^ College ^vtttinqsi 




CHORUS 

College Spesh — College Spesh, 

What do you have to do ? 
You can play and sing most anything 

And daub in the studio too. 
VI. 
But I'd rather be a Freshman 

They're the finest lot of all, 
They are actively engaged in things 

From Math to Basket Ball. 
CHORUS 
Sure we are — sure we are, 

Don't you wish you could be too? 
It doesn't take dignity but just common sense 

To sit on the Freshman bench. 



Y. W. C. A. 

This month has seen the going out of the old cabinet 
and the coming in of the new. On March fifth a joint 
cabinet meeting was held for the purpose of giving the 
new members a clearer idea of their work through the 
advice of their predecessors in office. The following 
Sunday was the installation service, when the former 
president took the pledges of the new officers and com- 
mittee chairmen whose names are given below. 

President — Ruth Want. 

Vice-President — Helen McGhee. 

Secretary — Alma Weber. 

Treasurer — Alice Tombaugh. 

Devotional Committee — Ola Wendel. 

Social Service Committee — Johanna Onken. 

Missions Committee — Lucile McCloud. 

Social Committee — Winifred Burmeister. 

Association News Committee — Dorothy Stevens. 

Systematic Giving Committee — Rachel Morris. 

Page Eighteen 




tzrije CoUege ^vutin^i 




PHI NU. 

Phi Nu joyfully accepted Daisy Coons' invitation 
to make her home the stopping place on our last bob 
ride. In spite of the fact that the old girls had assured us 
that the rides out there before had been more fun than 
anything, the realization far exceeded our expectations. 
Miss Anderson went with us and after riding over mud 
and tipping through snowdrifts we finally reached the 
house, Mrs. Coons served a delicious supper and all too 
soon we had to start on our ride homeward. 

The new members of Phi Nu are Elaine Buhrman, 
Dora McKee, Gertrude Haines and Gladys Jones. 

The second number of the Phi Nu Bulletin was issued 
this month and sent to all our old members. Though as 
yet is is only a modest sheet we are finding it an effective 
organ of the "thread of blue which binds us." 

Our society programs have been made out for the rest 
of this year. The programs are based on sociology and 
social service. 

Peril Hess went to St. Louis for a week-end as Miss 
Ruth Crawford's guest, to see the working of some of the 
organizations which carry on the work of social service. 

LAMBDA MU. 

During the snowy weather of the past month, Lamb- 
da Mu took a jolly bob ride, followed by an oyster stew at 
Miss Rose Ranson's on Mound Avenue. 

The society has taken up the study of women's work 
with an eye to vocational occupations for the women of 
today. 

Miss Mary Louise Witbeck, Lambda Mu's former vice- 
president, has assumed the presidency of the society be- 
cause of the election of Miss Ruth Want as president of 
the Y. W. C. A. 

Miss Want was at home to Lambda Alpha Mu on the 
evening of March 14th. 

Page Nineteen 




tSitt CoUege ^reettngtf 



ACADEMEA NOTES. 

Feb. 26 a jolly party composed of twenty-five mem- 
bers of the Academea, Miss Ireland, Miss Berger and Miss 
Robinson left school for a bob sled ride. After an hour's 
drive about town they returned to Batz's where they had 
dinner. 

Beatrice Robertson has been elected to the office of 
vice-president to fill the vacancy made by Nell Rives. 



Miss Abegail McKay of Dallas, Texas, visited her 
sister, Miss Estelle McKay, of the music faculty, Feb- 
ruary 1 7. 

The Belles Lettres quartette sang at a Knights of 
Pythias reception Feb. 20. 

Miss Hay lectured on the Faelton System to the Teach- 
ers' Training class, Feb. 20. 

Miss Beebe was called home Feb. 20 on account of 
the sickness and death of her mother. Miss McKay and 
Miss Fern Hartsuck substituted for Miss Beebe, in Grace 
church choir, during her absence. 

Miss McKay sang for the Woman's Guild March 7. 

Mr. Walter E. Beebe, attorney for Sanitary district, 
visited his sister Miss Anne Beebe of the music faculty, 
March 6. 

Christine Miller, contralto, was here on the Artists' 
course, in recital, March 2. Her personal charm, with 
her artistic temperament and perfect diction made her re- 
cital a very pleasing one. She added charm by her ex- 
planation of some of her German songs. 

Miss Nicholson gave a recital in Music Hall, March 8. 
Her clean pedaling and beautiful tone production was es- 
pecially noticable throughout the entire program. 
Page Twenty 




^f)e College Greetings; 




Miss Hay, gave a "Travel party" in honor of four 
members of the college faculty who are going abroad 
soon. Misses Neville and McLaughlin of the literary 
faculty, will tour Europe this summer. Miss Nicholson 
sails in July for Berlin, where she will study with the 
greatest exponent of Leschetizki method in Berlin, 
Madame Steppaffi. Mrs. Kolp sails in Sept. for Berlin 
to study theory with Hugo Kaum. Both Miss Nicholson 
and Mrs. Kolp expect to stay one year. 

In the regular Thursday afternoon recitals many inter- 
esting programs are being given. One of especial note 
was given March 12, in which all schools of composition 
were represented. 

Everyone is looking forward with great anticipation 
to the recital to be given by the Kneisel Quartet, March 
25. This is the next to the last number on our Artists' 
Course for this year. 

^? 
HOME ECONOMICS. 

On Saturday afternoon, March 7, the Home Eco- 
nomics department entertained the Illinois Woman's Col- 
lege Guild and faculty of the college. Regular class 
work was carried on by the first year cookery class, while 
the second year students served light refreshments. 
There was also an exhibition of the sewing and handwork 
which had been done during the year by the members of 
classes in Household Arts. 

Miss Churton gave a talk on "Proper Nourishment 
of the Family" at the public library Thursday afternoon, 
February 26. 

On the evening of March 3rd, Mr. A. A. Sleyman of 
New York City, an authority on Oriental rugs, gave a lec- 
ture at the public library on "The True Rug of the Orient" 
illustrating his talk with samples. The Home Economics 
students attended in a body. They found it a very in- 
teresting and instructive talk which fitted in nicely with 
their class work. 

Page Twenty-one 




tIDtie CoUese <Ilreetmss( 




ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE. 
1913 EndoMonent and Improvement Fund. 

Since the last report which was made January 15, 
1914, there has been paid in a total of $3,015.99 by 
twenty-two subscribers. Seven of these have generously 
paid the entire subscription, which is greatly appreciated. 
Fifteen have made partial payments. Of the twelve hun- 
dred twenty-six subscribers to the fund, four hundred 
seven have now paid in full; four hundred ninety-one have 
paid in part and three hundred twenty-eight have not yet 
made any payments on their pledges. It is hoped that 
these will make their payments soon, and that many of 
them will find it possible to give the entire amount in one 
payment. 

The following is a summary: 

Total amount pledged $182,242.95 

Balance due January .15, 1914 79,216.06 

Amount paid by 22 friends from January 

15, 1914 to March 14, 1914 3,015.99 

Balance due March 14, 1914 i . . 76,200.07 

Total amount now paid 106,042.88 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Feb. 20 The trial month of Student Government be- 
gins, with Clara Kelly as House President 
and Ola Wendel Secretary of the Board 
of Proctors. 

Feb. 21 Washington's Birthday party. A half holiday. 

Feb. 22 Washington's Birthday. 

Feb. 23 The Fourth Academy presents "Mr. Bob," an 
excellent production with a well balanced 
cast. 

Feb. 25 Stunt night. The Juniors present "Getting 
Out an Annual." Every Junior's middle 
name is Annual just now. 

Page Twenty- two 




tICfje College (greetings; 




Dr. Seymour lectured on Frederick The Great 
at morning chapel. 

Feb. 28 Mrs. Marker, Mrs. Metcalf and George re- 
turn from California. 
Sophomore-Freshman Captain-Ball Game. 

45-28 in favor of the Sophomores. 
May Day Election. Fred Fenton elected 
May Queen. Definite plans for May Day 
begin to take shape. 

March 1 March comes in like a lion. 

March 2 Freshman Candy Pull. Christine Miller's re- 
cital. 

March 3 Dr. Seymour lectured on Marie Antoinette at 
morning chapel. 
Miss Katherine Moss talked at evening 
chapel on the war in Bulgaria as seen at 
The Girls' School at Lovetch. 

March 4 Stunt night. College Sing. 

March 7 Belles Lettres Candy Sale. 

March 9 Miss Nicholson's recital. 

March 10 House meeting. 

March 1 1 Dr. Marker announced at chapel that the Fac- 
ulty had voted to recommend Miss Erma 
Lytle Elliott for the graduate scholarship 
offered by the University of Illinois. 
Stunt night. The Second Academy class pre- 
sented "Prep Days." 

March 12 Miss May's Travel Party for the Faculty. 

March 1 4 Greetings goes to press. Basket-ball game, 
Blues vs. Whites. 

March 16 Junior-Senior Reception. 

March 1 7 The Expression Department presented 
"Arrah-na-Pogue. " 

March 1 8 Stunt night. 

March 2 1 Freshman- Junior Party. 

Page Twenty-three 




Ci)e CoQege ^^reetings; 



March 25 Kneisel Quartette. 

March 30 Miss Editha Parsons' recital, "Everywoman. 



"I SHOULD WORRY." 

German — Ich sollte mich sorgen. 
French — Que je me troublerais. 
Italian — Vorrei tormentar mi. 
Spanish — Seria atormentado. 
Swedish — Jag skulle grubbla. 
Yiddish (alleged) — Ish ca bibble. 
Bohemian — Mam se starat. 
Polish — Ja sie man klopotar. 
Finish — Minako surism. 
Japanese — Doya moya. 
Norwegian — Jag skulle soeya. 

Voluntary contribution of Genevieve Dague,'17. 



FOURTH PREP PLAY. 

On Monday night, February twenty-third the fourth 
prep class presented "Mr. Bob" by Rachel E. Baker, in 
Music Hall. Owing to the heavy snow fall there was not 
as large an audience as might otherwise have been ex- 
pected, but all present seemed to enjoy the ludicrous situa- 
tions in which Mr. Brown was placed and the comedy of 
Patty and Jenkins. 



EXCHANGES. 

The Blackburnian is an enthusiastic paper, but there is 
too great an abundance of slangy expressions to give it 
rank as a literary product. 

We found only one story in the Lincolnian and that 

Page Twenty-four 




W^ CoQege Greetings; 




poorly constructed. If it were meant to be humorous it 
missed the mark. 

The departments are well represented in the Pegasus 
and are of good character. 

The Augustana has a forceful article on the removal 
of the saloon, a splendid report of the Kansas City con- 
vention, and an interesting well told story that go to make 
it a paper worth while. 

"The worst thing about wasting time is that it does not 
aways belong to us." — Ex. 

The Rockford Ralla contained a good poem and sev- 
eral interesting stories. These made up the bulk of the 
paper so that a decided lack was felt in the department 
reports which are a vital part of a true college paper. 

We recognize that a paper should not be overbur- 
dened with locals and jokes, but well chosen ones give 
spice to a number that is decidedly literary. St. Mary's 
Chimes could be improved by such an addition. 

Frances Shimer Record, your "Imaginary Faculty 
Meeting" shows how much akin are the problems and de- 
sires of all girls. 

The exchanges will be placed in the library when the 
exchange editor is through with them. Read them girls. 
It will be worth your while to get in touch with other 
colleges. 

"Have you ever stopped to think when a conversation 
bored you that perhaps the fault lay in your listening as 
well as the other person's talking? Do you not imagine 
that sometimes when you went home from church and said 
that the sermon was uninteresting, the minister might also 
have gone home and told his family that his audience was 
unappreciative and listless." — Western ' Oxford. 



Page Twenty-five 



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THE TWENTY DEPARTMENTS in our store are 
just like twenty little stores, every one devoted to 
the sale and display of articles FOR THE Modern 
Woman's wear. 

Each Department makes a determined and successful 
effort to show first the attractive new styles 
of the season. You'll find shopping- pleasant 
here. 



Kid Gloves 
Neckwear 
Fabric Gloves 
lyinen 

White Goods 
Notions 
lyaces and 

Embroideries 



Corsets 
Art Goods 
Petticoats 
Handkerchiefs 
Ribbons 
Toilet Goods 
Jewelry and 



Knit Underwear 
Hosiery 

Children's Wear 
Muslin Underwear 
and Waists 
Coats and Suits 
Dresses 



Iveather 



LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 



O i 




FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

Footwear for all occasions — 
Street Shoes 

Dress Slippers 

Bed-room Slippers 

n o IP :f IB K. s' 

We Repair Shoes 



i J. A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER 



I THE COLLEGE STORE I 

S 3 

= S 

I Pennants, Stationery, Tennis Goods, Drug's, School I 

I Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory | 

I Books and Photo Albums | 

I "PLEJASED customers" — OUR MOTTO \ 

i Goods Delivered i 

X I 

I Phones: Illinois 57a, Bell 457 Corner South Main St. and Square 1 

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Otto Speith 

pboto iportraiture 



Our Portraits were accepted and hung at the National Convention 
in Kansas City 1913 



Formerly Watson Studio 



■Southwest Corner Square | 



mn 



"ROACH> 

'IWOI0 



3 to 

MULLENIX & HAMILTON 

For Everything Sweet 

Hot and Cold Sodas 

216 East state Street 



Coover&Shrevel 

I 
Have a complete line of I 

Drugs, Kodaks, Perfumes, | 

Stationery and Holiday Gifstf 

I 
We do Developing- & Printing-f 

s 
East and West Side Square | 



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The most dainty things in Ringfs and Jewelry. 

New and handsome styles of gfoods in Sterling- Silv 

Hig-hest grades of Cut Glass, and every 

description of Spectacles and E^ye Glasses 

Fine Diamonds a Specialty 

at 

RUSSE^LL & LYON'S 

The Oldest Established Jewelry House in Central Illinois 

West Side Square 

Both Phones 96 



er 



I Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say 

I We can furnish your 

I Shoes and Party Slippers 

I in the popular styles, 

I leathers, and 

I fabrics 



All the Faculty, Students and Friei 
of the College should have a Cheoki 
or Savings Account with 

F. G. FARRELL & 0( 

BANKERS 

F. E. Farrell, President 

E- E. Crabtree, Vice-President 

H. H. Potter, Cashier 

M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier 



Seraphina — "I just love Shakespeare, but of course I 
don't put him in the same class with Myrtle Reed." 

Seraphina — "If the proctors get pie out of this I'll 
run for a proctorship next time. I like pie!" 

Proctor, forgetting the dignity of her office — "Miss 
N., please may I speak to Kate? " 



(§rapt)ic 
Concern 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAI. OCCASIONS 



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For those who discriminate | 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to | 

please the students who come to our city. We select only the | 

best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. | 

Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and | 

Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. | 

Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all | 

College functions, | 

Vickery 3c Merrigan | 

CJAXERERS I 

227 West State Street | 



h Phones 309 



JAFEST PLACE TO TRADE 

j|lLLERBY'§ 

)RY GOODS STORE 



West Side Square 



Brady Bros, j 

Evverything- in Hardware andf 
Paints I 



u'S 9WT^W 0^ ^l!tU JOJ S;U9D 3AIJ 

-K^udJAji,, — X!;9pos HI ;.iod9J S(J9.insB9j; Suip'BSJ '"g "w 

(, ^uo ^lO/A j9q:^Ba noX! pinoAv io\oo qoiqAV 'j9q;ow,,~" 
91X111+500 K-CQ ^'BW J94 JO jopo 9q:^ iio Suipp9p '"g 'g 

H. J., furiously — "I filled my pitcher and set it down 
for just a minute and now it's gone!" 
E. B. — "Was the water gone, too? " 



he Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . $200,000 
Surplus . . 34,000 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 

|. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 

Julius E. Strawn, President 
Chas. B. Graff, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear 

H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

J. R. Robertson 



Established 1890 





C&o.^iKS, Si/fTS. FiffiS AmM/ii//jrffr 



lyow Prices Square Dealing" 
Keep us busy 



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z 
z 

£ 

I Coats, Suits and Skirts tailored to your individual 

z 
z 

I measure and form at 

I POPULAR PRICES 

z 

I All work made in our own shop by expert workmen. We 
I guarantee to fit you. 

z 

JACKSONVILLE TAILORING COMPANY 



233 East State Street 



Opposite Pacific Hotel 



Conscientious Proctor to Former Corridor Teacher — 
'if some one asks you for a permission and she has a 
piece of pie in her hand, do you get the pie? " 
F. C. T. — "Certainly! Always!" 
The Proctor went forthwith and got the pie. 



IHARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL CO. 

i Designs, Cut Flowers, 

I Plants 

i Southwest Corner Square 

I Greenhouse*, South Diamond St. 

I Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

i Greenhouses, Bell 775 



McGinn IS' 

The Yo«ngf Ladies' Shoe Store 

See the "BABY DOLI. SHOK' 
It's the Latest. 

We carry a full line of Evening Slippe 
in all colors. 

If it's new, we have it 

JAS. McGINNIS & OC 

Kaat Side Sqnare 



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I 



Want 

Cut flowers 



F 
E 

R 

N 



FROM 



JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 



Both Phones 



Classy Styles 
iWe will be pleased to show you our line 

FROST & NOLLEY 

Fashionable Footwear 

For All Occasions 
I 33 South Side Sq. Jacksonville, 111. 



Job Printing [ 

Of All Kinds I 

John K« Long | 

Engraved Cards and Invitations | 



213 West Morgan Street| 
Illinois Phone 400 | 



Seraphina, at captain-ball game — "Why do some of 
them have to stay in those little circles? The others 
don't." 



I Dorwart. Market 

I ALL KINDS OF 

|FRESH and SALT MEATS 
I FISH, POULTRY, Etc. 

I Both phones 196 230 W, State St. 



uiliiiiiuiiiiiiiriiiiiiii! 



KODAK FINISHING 

Vulcan Roll Films 

Cameras from $2.00 up 
Everything- strictly first class 

Vail & Vail 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. 



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PHOTOGRAPHER 



I Successor to McCulloug-h Bros. 



East Side Square 



I Cameras, Fflms, Papers^ 

I Photo Supplies for Kodakers 
{Developing, Printing and Mounting 

I at reasonable prices 

I Armstrongs Drug Store 

B 
I 

I South West Corner Square 



S. S. Kresge Co. 

5c & IOC Store 

New and Up-to-Date 



As read on Bulletin Board — Register before going on 
Proctor's spindle. 

R. P. — "I'm afraid I'd have a hard time getting on 
that spindle." 



PIPE YOUR HOUSE FOR 




OiVJS 


H. J. & h. M. SMITH 


Jacksonville Railway 


Art Needle Work 
and Millinery 


and Light Co* 


211 West State street 


224 S. Main Street 









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I IN"rEC3F=?IXV I 

fi7e have built op our GROCERY and DRUG Depattmcnts on a soIid| 
)undation of INTEGRITY. In our GROCERY and DRUGS WEI 
AY WHAT WE BELIEVE, and our customers BELIEVE WHATi 
7E SAY. Every item in our store is an example of PURE FOOD,| 
;LEAN food, GOOD FOOD and BEST DRUGS. I 

)URS is a GROCERY AND DRUG STORE with a C0NSCIENCE| 

>hon« 800 I^OBEiiKyTS BK^OS. Phone. 800 1 

Grocery — Pharmacy | 

29 South Side Sq. | 



Wc Sell 

i*hoenix Guaranteed 

Silk Hosiery 



j ^^ 



o/yTicnd 



DRY GOODS STORE 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 | 

A. L. Bromley | 

Ladies' Tailor | 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and | 
Repairing. Ladies' Man Tail- | 
ored Suits to order. Remodeling | 
of all kinds. Special rates to | 
I. W. C. students. All work | 
called for and delivered promptly | 



DEFECTIVE HEARING. 

Miss McL. — "Is she tickling you.? " 

M. L. — "Did you say I'm chicken-hearted? " 

Miss J. — "Describe Roman shoes." 

G. V. U. — "Men wore scandals in the house." 



I 111. Phone 57 Bell Phone 92 

Fresh Drugs, 
Fancy Goods 
Stationery 



T H 



I Badoer Drug Store 

I a doors West of Postoffice 

I 

I 235 E. State Street 

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Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



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I It will pay you to visit 

I SCHRAM'S 

I Jewelry Store 

I COLLEGE PINS, RINGS, SPOONS, ETC. 



Len G. Magill 
Printer 



I East State Street 

I 

I 

£ 



111. Phone 418 



T AYLOR'S 

Grocery 

A g-ood place to trade 
221 West State Street 



Miss S. — "Hand in your papers on Burke." 
Seraphina — "Did you say to write on Burke? I 
wrote a paper on Ben Johnston." 



I Montgomery & Deppe 

I 

I IN THEIR NEW PLACE ON THE WEST SIDE OF 
I THE SQUARE ARE SHOWING 

I EVERYTHING IN 

I Dry Goods and Ready-to-Wear Garments 

I Telephone for the Fall Catalogue 

c 

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d £ 

College Jewel rv • I 

Engraved Cards and invitations | 

Chafing Disi^es, Copper and Brass Goods | 

Special Die Stationer/ | 

21 South Side Square | 



^lepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 

HERE TO PLEASE 

Candies Cakes 

Cookies Pies 

Sandwiches Pop on Ice 

Groceries California Fruits 
School Suppiies 




miU§ 



Jacksonville's foremoat Men's Store I 

Mackinaw and Sweater Coats! 

Mannish Cut and Form Fitting | 

Hand Bags, Suit Cases and I 
Trunks I 

I. W. C. Banners and Pillows! 

SPECIAL DESIGNS ON REQUEST ! 



In English I (B. G.) — "I suppose you've all noticed 
that girls are better students than boys — " 

Miss N. — "Not very recently, of course, but in the 
olden days, perhaps." 



jadies' Late Style Sweater 
Coats 


C.S.MARTIN 

Wall Paper, Painting 




Are Sold by 


and Interior Decoratingf 
Pictures and Frames 




Frank Byms gt^. 


314 W. state St., Scott Block 




1 


Jacksonville, 111. 





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Cafe 



Confectionary 



Ipicacock Inn 



Catering- 



Soda 



Candies 



j SKIRT BOXES 
I ROCKERS. SCREENS, 
I DESKS AND 
I BED ROOM CURTAINS 

I AT 

iJohnson, Hackett & Guthrie 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



iColIege Girls 

Who Admire 

I stylish made Clothes should 
I visit the new 

j Royal Ladies* Tailors 

I Opposite Post Office on East State St. 

|You will find here such made clothes at 
|are only seen in metropolitian centers. 



SHOES 



slipper; 



The only Popular Price Shoe Stor 

in the city 

The only Shoe Store catering t 

special orders 

The newest shoes for the least 

money 

JOHNSON BROS. 

Under Farrell's Bank W. State & S< 



SHEET MUSIC, MUSIC MERCHANDISE 

TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 

AND SUPPLIES 

I 19 SOUTH SIDE PUBWC SQUARE 

^HIIUIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIII|||HIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlnlllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIlnlllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIU 



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J. BART JOHNSON | 

Everything Musical I 

PIANOS, PLAYER PIANOS, VICTROLAS, | 

IMPORTER OF VIOLINS, AND A COMPLETE | 

LINE OF MUSICAL MERCHANDISE | 

49 South Side Square | 



)r. Albyn Lincoln Adams 

Oculist and Aurist 
to the State School for the Blind 

323 West State Street 

Practice limited to diseases of the 
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



DR. ALPHA B. APPLEBEEi 
Dentist I 

326 Wett state St. I 



D. G., in Chemistry — "Alcohol has a strong and spir- 
itual odor." 



DR. BYRON S. GAILEY 

EYE, EAR, 
NOSE AND THROAT 



OflBce and Residence 
340 West state Street 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTEL 

The Home of the Traveling Man 

Jno. B. Snell, Prop. 

Rates I2.25, I2.50, and $3.00 per day 

One Block West of Woman's College 
Opposite Post Office 
Rooms with or without bath 
Local and Long Distance Telephone 
in every room. 

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Andre & Andre 

Evverything- in 

High Grade House Furnishir 

for I^verybody, Everywhere 
46-50 North Side Square 




I CAFE BATZ 

I And Annex for Ladies 

X 

I 221-223 East State Street 

r 

ilUinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111, 
Illinois Phone 388 



B. G. (discussing various departments of musical in- 
struction, in Englisli class) — "Well, I would place voice 
under wind instruments." 



3 

i Florence Kirk King 
{ Hair Dresser 

i special Service in Shampooing 
I Scalp Treatment, Manufacturing 
I Hair into Latest Styles 
I Work done by appointment 
I 111. Phone 837 503 W. College St. 



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Cherry's Livery 

Finest Light and Heav 
Livery 
Lowest Rates 

335-237, 302-304-306 North Main Stit 



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Sirls, Patronise our Advertisers I 



Ayers National Bank 

Founded 1852 



Capital 
^^200, 000 

Surplus 
^^0,000 




Deposits 
^1,250,000 

United States 
Depository 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 

Special Window for Ladies 
Ladies' Waiting- Room 
We make a feature of Ladies' Accounts, and have 
provided facilities for their exclusive use 



OFFICERS 
F. Dunlap, President O. F. Buffe, Cashier 

lidrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 

M. Hockenhull, Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst. Cashier 

C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 



wen P. Thompson 
iward F. Goltra 
hn W. lyeach 



DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhull 
M. F. Dunlap 



Harry M. Capps i 
O. F. Buffe I 

Andrew Russel 1 



lllllllllllllllllllilM!! ilinillMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIUIIIIIIIIMI Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinilll IIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIUIUIIIIIIIUIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIJ^ 




Music Hall 

Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLE« 

I College of Liberal Arts 

I (Full classical and scientific courses) 

I College of Music ^ 

I School of Fine Arts 

I School of Expression 

I School of Home Economics 

3 

I ^A Standard College — one of the best. 

I Regular college and academy courses 

I leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 

1 inently a Christian college with every 

I facility for thorough work. Located 

I in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 

I dignified, old college town, noted for 

I its literary and music atmosphere. 

I Let us have names of your friends 

I who are looking for a good college. 

I Call or address. Registrar 

i Illinois Woman's College, 

f Jacksonville, 111. 




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tKfje College (greeting^ 

€j[ The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 

<]| Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

€]] Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
€j} Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 

Contents 

Seniors 

Editorials .... 3 

Account of Arbor Day 5 

Class Song 6 

Poem 7 

Juniors 

The unveiling of the College Shield 8 

Conception of God in Psalms 9 

Sophomores 

Sophomore Class ii 

The Working Girl's Recreation .12 

Freshmen 

The Freshman Stunt 15 

The Seizure of Sabine Women 16 

Specials 

Senior Special Entrance into Chapel 18 

Music Department Notes 18 

Home Economics 19 

Art Notes 19 

Expression Notes 20 

Academy 

"The Reason Why" 20 

I/Ocals 21 

College Calendar 23 

Phi Nu 26 

Belles Lettres 27 

Ivambda Mu 27 

Condition of the College Greetings 27 

Annual Report of Business Manager 30 

Annual report of Treasurer of Council 31 

Student Government Report 31 

Alumnae Notes 31 

Exchanges 31 

The 

Graphic'Arts 

coitcbrn 



"And after April, when May follows 
And the white-throat builds, and all the 

swallows, 
Hark, where my blossomed pear tree in the 

hedge 
Leans to the field and scatters on the clover 
Blossoms and dew-drops — at the bent spray's 

edge— 
That's the wise thrush: he sings each song twice 

over 
Lest you should think he never could recapture 
The first fine careless rapture!" — 

— Robert Broxvning 



t 



ICbe(Iollegc(5rcctinQ6 



Vol. XVII 



Jacksonrille, 111., May, 191 4 



No. 8 



Facui,Ty Committed— MisB Motherahead, Miss Baker, Miss 

Johnston. 
Editor— Abbie P«avoy 

Associate Editors— Erma Elliott, Helena Munson, Helen McGhee 
Business Managers — Geneva Upp, Winifred Barmeister, Alma 

Harmel 



As the class of 1914 
passes out from the 
walls I. W. C. each 
member bears with her 
her own store of treas- 
ures. Amid my store 
there is one that even 
now is of untold value 
but whose value will 
increase as the years 
pass. This precious 
treasure, however, rep- 
resents the outlay of 
$4.00, no extra time, no extra toil. The treasure is 
not beautiful to behold, to an inexperienced eye it is 
merely a pile of small papers, each bound in the 
same tan cover, each having the words "College Greet- 
ings" and the seal with the motto "Knowledge, Faith, 
Service." But to me it is a record of four years of citi- 
zenship in the realm of college life, an unbroken record of 
the progress of the college, of the activities of the class 
from the account of our organization to the announce- 

Page Three 




tg^t CoUese ^reetmgff 



ment of our commencement. Memory books tell their 
tale, to be sure, but for the true college spirit, for the true 
record of all college affairs, you need the college paper. 
When your college course is finished, you will be proud 
of a complete file of the college paper for the four years 
that you have been a citizen in the realm of college life. 

Erma Lytle Elliott, '14. 

Senior Privileges! Worthy to be capitalized indeed 
in the eyes of the under classmen. But what you thought 
are so envious, what do you mean by the words? 
For you they connote "Freedom," "Superiority," 
"Good times," "Convenience," "Ease." For you they 
carry a glamour, a far-off, almost unattainable Utopia 
which is reached by virtue of a four years' climb. To 
you, the Seniors are a favored class, elevated through the 
inexplicable favoritism of rank to a carefree unrestrained 
existence. There is, however, another side that cannot 
be realized until it is lived through. To tell the truth, 
upper classmen are bound with stronger shackles than 
any other class in the college. Along with "Privilege" 
must ever go "Responsibility." On us it depends to be 
the leaders, the presidents, the chairmen, the starters of 
student sentiment. Upon our attitude must rest more or 
less the attitude of the entire student body. To those 
who think of the "Honor" of being Editor-in-chief of the 
Greetings, or President of the Athletic Association, or 
Senior Proctor, let me say that it is in no respect a com- 
pensation. If we did things for honor alone, there would 
be very few things done, that's all. To us is given the 
greatest responsibility of keeping up and increasing the 
ideals of the college. Because we love our Alma Mater 
we are willing to give the time and to bear the worry of 
our positions and sometimes to know the unappreciation 
and lack of understanding from our fellow students. 
Privileges? Yes, we do have them but the Responsibil- 
ities far, far outweigh them. When you are looking 
ahead try to see the inside as well as the outside of things. 

Page Four 




tS^^e College (ilreetings( 



and when you want mere privileges, ask yourself "Am 1 
willing and capable of receiving the ever accompanying 
responsibilities?" 

Letta Irwin, '14. 

The Seniors like to start things. They hope now to 
have established an Arbor Day ceremony for the improve- 
ment of the College campus. To plant a tree was not 
hard to decide, but the kind of a tree led to great discus- 
sion. Dr. Marker's disapproving smile caused them to 
give up the idea of an apple tree. A lecture given by Mr. 
Heinl at the library advising tree planters to choose only 
native trees barred fringe trees, lindens and tulips, caus- 
ing them to choose the elm which is the historical Jack- 
sonville tree. 

After a short chapel exercise we gathered around the 
large hole on the campus which had aroused so much 
curiosity. A tree had been placed in it according to 
Hoyle. The ceremony closed with the singing of the 
College song. The girls hurried back from the First 
Class Tree Planting to the ten-thirty classes. 

As we look over the annals, we find that the celebra- 
tion of Arbor Day is practically universal both in foreign 
lands and in America. The custom was started by the 
state of Nebraska in 1875 to be celebrated on the second 
Wednesday in April. In our own state of Illinois it was 
established in 1877 and two years later over 10,000 
schools honored it. 

Some one has said, "He who plants a tree plants a 
hope." We are the first class in the Woman's College 
to observe Arbor Day and with the planting we have the 
hope that the life of this little tree may in some small 
way, with the spreading of its boughs, prophecy the glory 
of the spreading boughs of our college. This branch is 
only a symbol of the seed that has been sown in our lives 
here which will make them useful and helpful plants in 
the future, and we leave this as the most significant and 
suggestive means of expressing our gratitude. Our col- 
Page Five 



Cbe College ^vtttinQi 




lege elm has been considered as the most loved tree all 
over America. Wherever we are in the future, I think our 
happiest recollections will be centered in the college days, 
and the elm marking Arbor Day will long remain as a 
monument of former happy times. 

HallieClem, '14. 

What a holding on, there is to these last few weeks. 
Each week brings new pleasurable events which come 
only to Seniors, yet which marks off one more step toward 
the close of our college years. "This is my last — " is a pass 
word among the seniors. Some times the lower class- 
men make undue sport of the phrase, but time will come 
when they will realize how hard it is to break from the 
present even for the charm of the future. What we have 
done and what we have meant to do, we measure with a 
sort of a down sinking of heart as we rush on to fill the 
remaining days full to the uttermost. Light permissions 
we seek as a common necessity, until those about us re- 
mark, "We can't see how those seniors are going to take 
time to graduate." We want to be busy. We want to 
get things done but we do not wish to give the impres- 
sion that all we have time for is "to rush." We believe 
that by this time that work should be so systematized that 
it would appear to be done with ease, but how often we 
undeceive those about us as we add one more mad rush to 
our rooms where we have placed the large sign "Busy." 

Abigail Peavoy, '14. 



CLASS SONG. 

To thee our dear College 

The Seniors are singing to-day 
By faith, service, knowledge. 

We pledge ourselves ever to stay. 
Thy bright burning lamp shines abroad o'er our way 
Lighting our future with roseate ray. 

Page Six 




Wi)t College ^vntinqi 




CHORUS 
Oh 

Dear Alma Mater, I. W. C. 
Our heartsrings ever shall throb for thee 
We ne'er forget thee 
Far though we be. 
The green and the white 
To the yellow and the blue will be true. 
Our class 1914 to '46 pays homage due 
The debt that we owe we never can pay 
The love that we feel we never can say. 

Letta Irwin, '14. 



"What, Only Seven Seniors?" 

Oh Freshmen eighty-four, 

You've quantity, we grant you: 
You've yet to prove what more! 

And Freshmen four and eighty, 
The Seniors beg to state 

That when we were Freshmen 
We were only twenty-eight ! 

So think not that the seven 
Have shrunk from eighty-four 

Go on, increase in wisdom! 
Don't value numbers more. 

If you, oh four and eighty 
Accomplish more than we 

We'll loyally applaud you. 
Class of loyal-loyalty. 



Seraphina — "When the Seniors come back a hundred 
years from now and look at their elm they can be as proud 
of it as we are of the Big Elm. I think the Big Elm must 
be a hundred years old, but we could tell if we cutit down 
and counted the rings." 

Page Seven 




Ctie CoUege ^reetingK 



THE CLASS OF 1915. 



JUNIORS 



®v^ ft ON 



"^ 






^- 



The Juniors had the 
privilege of unveiling 
the beautiful shield 
bearing the seal of the 
Woman's College at 
the chapel services on 
Tuesday morning, April 
7th. The shield is of 
mahogany and the seal 
of blue and gold. The 
shield measures 36x30 
inches and was made by 
Edward Wackerle. 
After the usual chapel service, Dr. Marker announced 
that the class of 1915 would then take charge of the morn- 
ing exercises. The Juniors, dressed in the white and blue 
of their class colors, marched to the platform. 
Helena Munson gave a talk on the history of the college 
seal — the worth of such a seal and such a motto to the 
college "Knowledge, Faith, Service" — unconsciously, 
perhaps, these three words are the keynote of nearly all 
chapel talks and addresses given at the college. It hardly 
seems possible to have chosen a more fitting motto. 
Peril Hess then made a brief talk saying that although we 
had had our college seal on stationery, catalogues, and 
programs, we had never had a real seal to look at for in- 
spiration day by day. Then at a signal, the great blue 
and white blanket with the 191 5 numerals upon it was 
drawn to the top of the stage, the blue and yellow drapery 
around the shield was drawn down, — and the shield dis- 
closed. The college song was sung by the student body 
and after a few remarks by Dr. Harker on the seal and 
motto the services closed. 

The class of 1915 deeply appreciates the honor con- 
ferred upon it in being given the privilege of unveiling this, 
the first seal of 1. W. C, and hopes to be proven worthy 

Page Eight 




W^t College ^reettngtf 



by daily striving to live up to the motto — to gain knowl- 
edge, to have faith and to live lives of service. 



Conceptions of God in the Psalms. 

The conceptions of God in all ages has been accord- 
ing to experiences through which the people have passed. 
Thus the Hebrews interpreted God in this way, they could 
only imagine God similar to their highest conceptions of 
man. 

We are able to follow this line of thought through all 
of the Psalms. In the early times when they were a war- 
like nation, God was a mighty warrior who went before 
them and led them to victory. Later God was a king 
sitting on a throne or else a judge. As they themselves 
knew little or no mercy toward their enemies, so they 
imagined God to be unmerciful toward the sinner. 

One of the earliest conceptions of God was of a man 
using the same instruments as they did in the seventh 
psalm. 

'if a man turn not, He (God) will whet his sword 

He later bent his bow and made it ready 

He hath also prepared for him the instrument of 
death, 

He maketh his archers fiery shafts." 

The idea of God as a judge and king seemed to be a 
much later one but even at this time there is very little 
idea of mercy: 

"Thou sittest on the throne judging righteously." 

In the eleventh psalm a similar idea is given of God 
as a judge and king : 

"Jehovah is in his holy temple 

Jehovah his throne is in heaven 

His eyes behold, his eyelids try the children of men." 

The Hebrew's conception of God all through the 
Psalms, especially in the earlier ones, is not that of love 

Page Nine 




UPbe Collese ^reettngtf 



and mercy, but revengeful and unmerciful to the wicked 
but dealing with mercy toward the righteous, 

"Jehovah trieth the righteous 

But the wicked and him that loveth violence his sword 
hateth. 

Upon the wicked he will rain snares, fire and brime- 
stone and burning wind shall be the portion of their cup. 

For Jehovah is righteous, he loveth righteousness 

The upright shall see his face." 

In another place, 

"Break thou the arm of the wicked 

And as for the evil man, seek out his wickedness till 
thou find none." 

The later idea which is more Christian, that God is a 
God of love, is brought into the Psalms to some extent. 
But even here God has love for the righteous alone, in- 
stead of one Avho forgives the sins of the wicked. 

"Praise ye Jehovah, oh give thanks unto him for he 
is good; for his mercy endureth forever. 

Who can utter the mighty acts of the Lord? " 

Who can show forth all his praise? " 

In many parts of the Psalms, we feel that God is more 
a God of the nation, who will protect the nation from her 
enemies but in other parts we feel that the psalmist has a 
more individual relation with God. At these times God 
seems to become almost a personality to them, to whom 
they can tell all their smallest troubles. 

Jehovah is thought to be the protection for the right- 
eous and a giver of all prosperity in many other Psalms. 

"God is our refuge and strength 

A very present help in trouble." 

"Happy is he that hath God of Jacob for his help 

Whose hope is the Lord, his God." 

The idea that God is all powerful and watchful is given 
in many places but his power and greatness are judged ac- 
cording to their own power or by things that they know as 
in the nineteenth psalm: 

Page Ten 



B^V>P 



tZPbe Collese ^reetingtf 



"The heavens declare the glory of God and the fer- 
manent showeth his handiwork." 

In many of the Psalms we feel that they consider God 
to be a being to be feared rather than loved. Many of the 
Psalms consist almost entirely of cries for mercy. 

Although our conception of God has changed to a 
great extent, still we are able to understand the Hebrew 
feelings as expressed in the Psalms. We are brought into 
a closer touch with the life of the people and their 
thoughts. 

Winifred Burmeister, '15. 



SOPHOMORES. 

Do not tell me fool- 
ish stories of the Fresh- 
men, now 1 say, for I'm 
thinking of the glories 
of the Sophomores 
every day. We are 
peachy and all hum- 
mers; nothing finer, not 
a lie, and we'll show off 
in the contest or I'll 
know the reason why. 
We're a class with good 
school spirit; Ave can 
work to beat the band and the rumours of our glory will 
spread throughout the land. We did surely fool the 
Freshmen, for to chapel they did trudge, and now! against 
the Sophomores they hold an awful grudge. We are 
faithful to the Seniors and so charming are our ways that 
they dearly love to have us help in parties, stunts and 
plays. Yes, the faculty are busy! Yet to us they ever 
rush with all the important matters, since on us they've 
sure a crush. Then, give three cheers for the Sopho- 

Page Eleven 




Wbt CoUege ^mtinQi 




mores, the class that's all O. K., for the memory of our 
spirit will live forever and aye. 

Lucile McCloud, '16. 

THE WORKING GIRL'S RECREATION 

Recreation has always been a vital factor in the life 
and growth of the city. In the classical cities, as much 
attention was given to the building of the theater and 
stadium as the market place and temple. The Greek 
cities had their games so important both in religion and 
patriotism. In mediaeval cities knights held their tour- 
neys and jousts, the Guilds gave their pageants and the 
church honored her saints with festdays and gay proces- 
sions. But it is only recently that our modern cities have 
realized that the growth of recreations controlled by the 
city has not kept pace with the gigantic development of 
industry which has gathered together more and more 
young women to supply labor for the countless factories 
and workshops of the city. 

Public attention was first directed to recreation for 
the child, resulting in the agitation for the establishment 
of public play grounds, boys' and girls' clubs. As condi- 
tions in the recreational life of the city became better 
known the idea that the older boys and girls and the 
grown-up too must play was taken up, and to provide the 
right sort of recreation for the working girl is now an im- 
portant part of the work of our cities. 

Those cities having sea or lake frontage soon saw the 
great recreative possibilities of the water and of their piers. 

The first venture of this kind was made in New York. 
To one of the regular docks was added a second story 
with the purpose of making an amusement center where 
music and fresh sea air would be the attractions. With- 
out interfering with the work on the lower floor, great 
crowds flocked to the new social center until it soon be- 
came one of the city's most popular resorts. Other sea- 
Page Twelve 



^f)t CoHegc ^reetingff 




coast cities were not loth to follow this example, and Chi- 
cago, too, in Lincoln and Jackson Parks, has a near ap- 
proach to these recreation piers. At the present time in 
New York, the piers are maintained by the Department of 
Docks and Ferries at great expense. Throughout the 
season a concert is given on each pier from eight to ten. 
The cost of the music alone is over fifty thousand dollars 
each season. These piers vary in size from three hundred 
to eight hundred feet and their capacity varies accordingly. 
On hot Sundays there are often as many as twelve thou- 
sand people on the larger piers. 

Many cities, both on the coast and inland, have built 
in their public parks large halls that furnish a needed rec- 
reational center. These halls are given over to any group 
of young people who wish to conduct dancing parties un- 
der city supervision and chaperonage. Many social clubs 
have deserted saloons for these municipal drawing rooms, 
which are decorated with growing plants from the park's 
greenhouse and are brilliantly lighted from the park's own 
power house. 

On the one hand, just as one set of men have organ- 
ized industrial enterprises and profit by the toil of the 
working girl, so another class of men and women too have 
entered the formerly neglected field of creation and 
make profit for themselves out of youthful longing for 
pleasure. Huge dance halls have been opened to the 
hundreds of toilers eager for a little relief from the mo- 
notony of their toil. Many of them stand wistfully out- 
side a rapid circle, for it requires five cents to procure 
within it the sense of intoxication and excitement so allur- 
ing. Many reformers have suggested regulations for the 
dance halls, moving picture theaters and other amusement 
resorts in regard to censorship, chaperonage, ventilation 
and lighting, but very gradually and by much effort have 
these suggestions influenced existing conditions. In a 
recent report it was found that twenty-six of the largest 
cities have passed dance hall ordinances, and twelve others 



Page Thirteen 



W^t CoUese ^reettnsse 



are working toward that end. While these measures may 
not produce radical results, they are at least a great step 
forward in the approach of the city toward controlled 
recreation. 

Along with the dance hall are other commercialized 
forms of recreation such as the moving picture and vau- 
deville theaters and the cheap music halls, very popular 
in some sections of the large cities, where the perform- 
ances are not always seriously objectionable, but mingling 
real fun with much that is coarse and rough. 

The recreation halls occasionally connected with fac- 
tories, the pleasure and mutual benefit societies and other 
organizations of churches and settlements are fitting a 
genuine social need, although wretchedly inadequate for 
the demands made upon them. The working girls them- 
selves are being led to put their idealism into neighbor- 
hood improvement and by uniting their efforts with those 
of settlement workers they are establishing social centers 
of their own with recreation halls for their own neighbor- 
hood. 

The foreign colonies found in all Aemrican cities af- 
ford an enormous reserve for recreational ideas. Not 
only do they celebrate the feasts and holidays of their 
fatherland, but have each their own expression for Ameri- 
can societies and anniversaries. The primitive Greek 
pipe played throughout the summer nights, the gay Bohe- 
mian theaters crowded with eager Slavs, the Hungarian 
musicians, the art loving Italians give a variety of sugges- 
tions and possibilities for public recreation and for the cor- 
porate expression of stirring emotions. 

Marie Miller, '16. 



Page Fourteen 



tE^iie CoUege Greetings; 




FRESHMAN STUNT 

April first was stunt 
night. The Freshmen 
gave the first chapter of 
their original illustrated 
poem, written by Geor- 
gia Humberd, Bertha 
Webber and Grace Hel- 
ler. In this chapter 
Patty, aided by her fond 
parents, decided on the 
Woman's College as an 
ideal place for fun, 
work and college life. 
She visited shops and dressmakers in the mad rush of final 
preparation. On the fateful morning as Jack presented 
his huge box of chocolates, the caller called, Danville, 
Decatur and Jacksonville! Tearful goodbyes were said 
and thus the first chapter ended. The next was given 
by a second division of the class the next Wednesday 
evening, April eighth. She was met by the Y. W. girls 
at the train and installed in her room with her new room- 
mate. The mail brings word that the room-mate's "man" 
is coming. But when Reginald with his monocle did not 
appeal to Patty exactly. 

In the third and last chapter the faculty filed past m 
stately tread, led by our dear Dr. Marker, in caps and 
gowns. They were formally recognizing the Senior class, 
one of whom was Patty. Later in the year, amid a pro- 
fusion of roses, Patty gave her voice recital to a spell- 
bound audience. Finally it was commencement day and 
father, mother and Jack come to see their fair one receive 
highest honors. She announces to Jack that she is going 
to teach and has a really fine position. He is visibly con- 
cerned and later tells her what is on his mind. Slowly 
she yields, then rushes into his arms. 



Page Fifteen 



^tt College ({lreetinsiB( 




THE SEIZURE OF THE SABINE WOMEN 

When Romulus his city built 

And planned and founded Rome, 
He made it not for present needs 

But as a future home. 
Then that its size might not be vain 

To make the city strong, 
He opened an asylum there 

For all oppressed by wrong. 

Men came from all the natives round 

To start their lives anew, 
Of every class, both bond and free. 

And strong the city grew. 
But with no issue of their line 

Their greatness soon would fall 
So to the neighboring nations sent 

An embassy to all. 

The right of inter-marriage 

And fellowship they sought 
They told of how the Romans brave 

With help from gods had wrought. 
How they had promised to protect 

And guard the Roman state: 
And surely no one would be loath 

To share so kind a fate. 

But nowhere were they well received 

For all were filled with fear 
To think of such a growing power 

And of their strength to hear. 
When the ambassadors were met 

With scorn on every hand, 
The Roman men their minds made up 

Some vengeance to demand. 



Great Romulus, with anger hid. 
Prepared a festive day 

Page Sixteen 




^f)e College Greetings; 




And bade the neighbors all to come 

To view the great array. 
The Consualia, he said, 

With games they'd celebrate. 
But secretly they planned to avenge 

The insult to their state. 

The guests assembled on that day 

From every nearby town, 
Filled with a keen desire to see 

This city of renown. 
The Sabines came among the rest, 

Their wives and children brought, 
And all were hospitably received, — 

Of fear they had no thought. 

When all had gathered at the games 

And on them were intent, 
A sign was given to the men 

Who among the Sabines went: 
Each one a maiden quickly seized, 

Before their parents' eyes. 
So swiftly had the deed been done 

They could not heed their cries. 

The maids at random had been seized 

And quickly carried home, 
By those to whom they chanced to fall, 

These bold young men of Rome! 
Those who for beauty had been known 

Were to the chiefs assigned, 
The others fell into the hands 

Of men of every kind. 

The parents fled in greatest fear 

Disturbed by this bold deed, 
Accusing broken bonds of faith 

'Twixt host and guest agreed. 
Calling on the god whose games 

Page Seventeen 



JSift CoOes^ ^reettngcf 




7"hey had come to Rome to see 
To help them to avenge this crime 
And their protector be. 

Alice Tombaugh, '17. 



The Senior Specials 
made a very pretty 
official entrance into 
chapel April 1. The 
Special class dressed in 
white, wearing violets, 
led the way. The fac- 
ulty followed led by 
Dr. Marker. The Spe- 
cial Seniors came in last 
and took their places in 
the front row of the 
Special section. Direc- 
tor Swarthout played Meditation from Thais. Mr. D. M. 
Swarthout accompanied him on the organ. 

This ceremony of seating the Senior Specials will take 
place hereafter annually at the beginning of the second 
semester. 




ColUot 3|^6ciaU 



MUSIC REPORT. 

We consider ourselves very fortunate in having with 
us the exponents of chamber music, "The Kneisel Quar- 
tette," on March 25. Their ensemble work and phrasing 
was perfect, and the recital was greatly enjoyed by all. 
Mrs Hartmann, who has sung with the quartette, enter- 
tained in their honor. 

At the Teachers' Institute which was held here March 
2 7, Director Max Swarthout played the viloin solo 
Wieniawski's "Valse Capriccio," and Mr. Donald Swarth- 
out played Rees' "Perpetual Motion," for piano. 

The final number of the lecture course was given on 

Page Eigliteen 



tBf)t CoUege ^reetings( 




April 6 by Miss Carol Robinson, pianist, of Chicago. Mrs. 
Jess, soprano, who was to have appeared in joint recital 
with her, was ill and unable to appear. Miss Robinson's 
work was very artistic, and her beautiful tone made the 
recital a very pleasing one. 

The annual series of senior recitals opened April 2 with 
an organ recital by Alice Mathis, pupil of Mr. D. M. 
Swarthout. Piano recitals were given April 9 by Deane 
Obermeyer and April 23 by Lucile dinger, pupils of Mr. 
D. M. Swarthout. A joint recital in voice was given 
April 16 by Nina Slaten and Helen Jones, pupils of Mrs. 
Hartmann. Miss Helen Harrison, pupil of Mr, Max von 
L. Swarthout, gave her recital April 30. The series will 
close with that of Mary Shastid, pupil of Mr. D. M. Swarth- 
out, May 7. The programs have been exceedingly inter- 
esting and have reflected great credit upon the department 
as a whole. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

The students of the Home Economics Department at- 
tended a talk at the public library given by Mr. Heinl on 
the evening of March 31st concerning the planning of 
home grounds and the planting of trees and shrubs. 

On Saturday, April 4, Miss Bailey of the Department 
of Agriculture at Washington, D. C, gave a very inter- 
esting and profitable talk to the students about the oppor- 
tunities open to young women who are trained along 
home economics lines. Many new ideas were gained by 
the students. 

The practice classes in the department which are 
taught by the students of the second year are progressing 
very nicely. Next year classes of this kind will probably 
be started in September. 

ART NOTES 

Miss Knopf has her pictures on exhibition in the 
studio. 

Page Nineteen 



tC^t CoOese ^reetingfl 




EXPRESSION NOTES. 

On the thirtieth of March occurred Miss Editha Par- 
sons's second annual recital. The many town people and 
students greatly enjoyed her exquisite presentation of 
Norman Duncan's "Mother." 

The Expression Department entertained the public on 
April seventh with an exhibition of Preparatory, Expres- 
sional and Aesthetic Work in Rhythm. It was represen- 
tative of the work done in the rhythm classes under the 
direction of Miss Allen. 

The contest season has begun. This is shown by the 
fact that Miss Parsons and Miss Allen have frequently been 
called to act as judges at various high schools. 



THE REASON WHY 

Oh, why are the fourth 
preps gathered 
Again in an anxious 
group ? 
So often of late we have 
seen them 
As out of the chapel 
we troop. 

Poor things — they are 
choosing new colors, 
It does seem to worry 
them so. 
Well, they have the whole rainbow before them. 

Why don't they choose some and go? 
Here they come, let us ask whal they've chosen 

And why it has taken so long — 
Pink and Green! — what a queer combination, 
Now what on earth can be wrong? 

"Green and white would be — oh so much better 
Why didn't you take those, you geese? " 

Page Twenty 




Wi^t College (greetings^ 



"Oh the Seniors have had them for ages, 
You see they come first, if you please." 

"And yellow and white are the Sophomores. 

No wonder you had such a time. 
Why don't you take red? O those Freshmen, 

They entirely slipped my mind. 

"Blue and white? — Those belong to the Juniors. 

But wait — Now I'll tell you just what, 
Lavendar!" "Oh but the Specials — 

You left them quite out of your thought." 

"Let's see, I must think for a little. 

It's quite a big problem, I guess. 
Excuse me for speaking so quickly. 

You've done pretty well I confess. 

"Girls, I must have more time to consider. 

I'll think of some soon, but — oh well. 
Don't you mind, pink and green are right pretty. 

Really, girls, why, I think they are swell." 

Marjorie Becker, '18. 



LOCALS 

Miss Louise Miller of Chicago was a visitor at the 
College March 22. 

Mr. Max Swarthout was called to PawPaw, Illinois, 
March 29 by the death of his uncle. 

Miss Florence Nicholson, preceptress and head of the 
English Department at Grand Prairie Seminary, Onarga, 
Illinois, visited her sister, Miss Grace Nicholson of the 
Music Faculty. 

Mr, Chas. Beebe, purchasing agent for the Independ- 
ent Harvester Company, visited his sister. Miss Anna 
Beebe, over Sunday. 

Page Twenty-one 




Ct)e CoUese Greetings; 



Miss Anne Marshall, '13, made a short visit with old 
friends. 

An important Freshman meeting was called by the 
Sophomores on April Fool's Day. 

A new davenport adds much to the appearance and 
comfort of the Y. W. room. 

Several mothers have been here lately, among whom 
were Helen Jones's and Mary Shastid's. 

Susan Rebhan, '05, visited at the College April 18-19. 

yf 
Joint Program by German Club and Music History Class 

The German Club and Music History class gave a very 
interesting program March 30. The subject was the Ro- 
mantic movement in Literature, Music and Art, with spe- 
cial reference to Heine. A number of Heine's songs were 
sung by Miss Beebe, Fern Hartsuck and Johanna Onken. 

yf 
Junior-Senior Reception 

On March 16 the Juniors were given a royal reception 
by the Seniors in the society halls. An orchestra hidden 
behind screens and palms helped to brighten the evening 
with its music. Geneva Upp proved an efficient chalk 
talker and crayon artist when she drew a cartoon and read 
a fitting verse for each one. Late in the evening the 
guests were taken into Phi Nu hall, which had been 
screened off for a dining room. On each table was a 
bowl of white sweet peas set in the midst of green smilax. 
Lighted candles sitting on the backs of genuine Irish potato 
pigs made the tables cheerful. Each one was guided to 
her place by a map of Ireland. Refreshments were 
served which were equal in quality to the other prepara- 
tions for the evening. As we tiptoed to our rooms at a 
late hour we Juniors felt that the Junior-Senior reception 
had measured up to all the good things we had heard of 
it in the last three years. 

Page Twenty-two 




tEfje CoUcge (^rcetingsf 



CALENDAR. 

March 16 — Junior-Senior reception. 

March 1 7 — Arrah-na-Pogue presented by the Expression 

Department. ^ 
March 18 — Spelling- match. 
March 21 — Freshman-Junior party. 

March 2 2 — Dr. Marker talked on The Five Appeals of 
Christianity, the fear of Hell, the Hope of 
Heaven, the Joy of the Religious Life, the 
Call of our own Personality, and the Call 
to Lose One's Self. 
March 2 5 — Kneisel Quartette. 
March 26 — Walking Clubs start. Report your points to 

your club captain weekly. 
March 88 — Senior Table. 
March 29 — Geneva meeting. 
March 30 — Miss Editha Parsons' recital, "The Mother," 

by Norman Duncan. 
March 31 — The names of the Seniors in the Special De- 
partments are announced. 
April 1 — Senior Specials take their rank in chapel. 

Freshmen present Part I of "When Patty Went 
to College." 
April 2 — Organ recital by Alice Mathis. 
April 3 — Miss Knopf entertains the faculty and students at 

a studio tea, showing her pictures. 
April 4 — Miss Knopf entertains the College Guild in the 
studio. 
Progressive dinner given by Dr. and Mrs. Har- 
ker to faculty and students. 
April 5 — Palm Sunday. Dr. Harker talked on Passion 

Week. 
April 6 — Miss Carol Robinson in piano recital. 
April 7 — College shield and seal hung in the chapel by 
Juniors. 
Expression Department entertainment. 
April 8 — Freshmen present "When Patty Went to Col-' 
lege," Part IL 

Page Twenty-three 



Wtit College <{|reetingf( 



April 9 — Deane Obermeyer's piano recital. 

April 10 — General exodus to spend Easter at home. The 
girls we leave behind us hunt the rabbit's nest 
at a campus frolic given by the Y. W. C. A. 

April 11 — Easter vacation. Picnic at Gravel Springs for 
those who stayed. 

April 12 — Easter Sunday. 

April 13 — "Is this still vacation or is this just Monday?" 

April 14 — Hard at work again. 

April 15 — Freshmen present "When Patty Went to Col- 
lege," Part III. 

April 16 — Nina Slaten and Helen Jones give their senior 
recital in voice. 

April 1 7 — Seniors celebrate Arbor Day. 

April 1 8 — Phi Nu open meeting. 

April 20 — Mrs. Read's recital. 

April 21 — Theta Sigma Play. 

April 22 — Senior dinner given by Dr. and Mrs. Harker. 

April 2 3 — Lucile dinger in recital. 

April 25 — "Sparklebug" operetta presented by Phi Nu. 

April 2 7 — Madrigal Club concert. 

April 30 — Violin recital by Helen Harrison. 

May 2 — Belles Lettres open meeting. 

May 4 — Miss Beebe in recital. 

May 5 — Essay contest. 

May 6 — Recital by Miss Hay's pupils. 

May 7 — Mary Shastid in recital. 

April 8 — Expression contest. 

May 1 1 — May Day. 

May 14 — Athletic Association election, 10 a. m. 
Fern Hartsuck in recital, 4:15. 

May 1 8 — Recital by Intermediate students of the College 
of Music. 

May 1 9 — Greek play late in the afternoon. 

May 21 — Miss Nicholson's pupils' recital, 4:15. 

May 22 — Greek play (if it rains on the 19th). 

May 25 — Athletic Association's Field Day. 

Page Twenty-four 




tE^t CoQese ^reettns£( 



May 29 — Last chapel. Awards of prizes, honors, etc. 

Academy Commencement, 8 p. m. 
May 30 — Exhibit of School of Fine Arts. 

Exhibit of Home Economics Department. 
Play by Expression Department. 
May 31 — Baccalaureate Sunday. 

Y. W. C. A. sermon, 7:30 p. m. 
June 1 — Exhibits continued. 
Class Day, 9 a. m. 
Meeting- of Trustees, 1 :30 p. m. 
Alumnae reunions as may be arranged. 
Commencement concert of the College of Music, 
8:00 p. m. 
June 2 — Commencement Day. 

Commencement, 9:30 a. m. 

Graduates' reception, following Commencement 

exercises. 
College Luncheon, 1 :00 p. m. 



EASTER VACATION 

Suit cases piled in lower halls on Friday marked the 
general exodus for the one day's vacation. The seventy 
left behind centered their attention on making the recess 
different from the usual routine. The Y. W. planned 
an Qgg hunt on the campus for Friday evening. A lively 
bunch of girls it was who immediately scattered over the 
campus after dinner in search of the brightly colored eggs. 
When the eggs had all been found the groups centered 
about the bonfires to roast marshmallows until it was too 
cold and dark to remain out of doors any longer. 

Saturday there was a picnic for those who wished it at 
Gravel Springs. Dinner cooked over the camp fire, a 
long romp in the woods, climbing fences, looking for birds 
and flowers, a gay ride home filled the day with satisfac- 
tion. 

One of the loveliest days of the year has been until 

Page Twenty-five 



tB^f)e College (Jlreetingg 



the last two years the Easter Sunday under the direction 
of the Y. W. C. A. No noisy rising bell in those other 
days awakened the sleeping girls, but voices singing Easter 
hymns on all the corridors. The breakfast room was 
made by these same girls a flower-land. These exercises 
because of the few left in the College have for the most 
part had to be omitted. A day of rest has been gained, 
the girls still place a bunch of spring blossoms at your 
place at the breakfast table, but the whole effect of the 
lovely day has necessarily been given up. We are glad 
for the holiday but we miss the ceremonies of the other 
Easter days. 

PHI NU. 

The annual open meeting of the Phi Nu Society was 
held on April 18 in Music Hall. The literary program 
which was given was based upon Social Conditions and 
Social Service, of which the society has made a study dur- 
ing the semester. Erma Elliott talked on "The Child in 
the Industrial World." Elaine Buhrman and Ruth Har- 
per read papers on "Summer Camps and Playgrounds" 
and "The George Junior Republic," and Abbie Peavoy 
read a charming original story, "His Three Days." 

There were two musical numbers, a vocal solo by Fern 
Hartsuck and a two-piano number, "The Dance of Death" 
by Ruth Mattocks and Ruth Brown. The program was 
concluded by the Phi Nu song. 

THE SPARKLEBUG. 

The posters announcing the Phi Nu stunt "The 
Sparklebug" were decidedly clever and heralded an 
equally clever musical skit. The scene was laid at Lake 
Mantanzas with a crowd of 1. W. C. girls in camp at Oak 
Lodge. There were a good many songs, parodies from 
"The Firefly," and a breezy shadow of a plot. We gave 
it on April 25 in Music Hall and charged admission, hoping 
thereby to make a goodly sum for endowment. 

Page Twenty-six 




Wfit College 0vtttin^i 



BELLES LETTRES. 

The Belles Lettres open meeting will be held Saturday 
evening, May second, in Music Hall. 

The programs on the study of the American Drama 
have been especially interesting the past month. At one 
meeting Miss Allen gave a talk on the American Farce, 
with selections from John Kendrick Bangs. April 14 
Miss Parsons talked on the Little Theater, giving a de- 
scription of the theater and its motives and a synopsis of 
"The Pigeon," one of its plays. 

Miss Louise Miller and Miss Sieverdena Harmel were 
here for a few days in March. 

LAMBDA MU NOTES. 

We were very glad to have with us at our meeting on 
April 7, Erma Cressner, one of our members of last year, 
who was the guest of Ruth Want. 

We regret greatly the loss of one of our members, 
Zala Fonner, who has returned home because of illness. 
Irma Miller, who left in February, we are glad to learn, 
is much improved. 

Much interest has been shown in the programs this 
semester and the work done has been strong and inspiring. 
Splendid papers dealing with the work of women in the 
past and opportunities for women in the future have been 
given by Georgia Humberd, May Blackburn, Ruth Want, 
Grace Heller, Wylma Cox and Ola Wendel. 

THE COLLEGE GREETINGS CONSTITUTION 

ARTICLE I. 

Section 1 — The name of this publication shall be the 
College Greetings. 

Section 2 — The purpose of this publication shall be 
to record College events, to assist the alumnae in keeping 
in touch with the College, to publish the best literary effort 

Page Twenty-seven 



mammuaesaasi 



W^t CoUes^ (flreetingsi 



of the student body, to serve as an effective organ for 
college activities, to express the atmosphere and spirit of 
the College, and to serve the best interests of the College 
in all ways. 

Section 3 — The College Greetings shall be published 
monthly during the school year by the students of the Illi- 
nois Woman's College. There shall be no less than 
twenty-four pages, exclusive of advertisements, of mate- 
rial in each number. The price shall be $1.00 per year, 
60c per semester; single copies, l5c to non-subscribers, 
10c to subscribers. 

ARTICLE II. 

Section 1 — The Greetings staff shall consist of an 
editor-in-chief, one associate editor, two assistant editors, 
one art editor, one business manager, two assistant busi- 
ness managers, and a faculty advisor. 

Section 2 — The staff shall be appointed the first week 
in May of each year. The staff shall make nominations, 
which shall be voted upon by a committee consisting of the 
President of the College, the Dean, the Senior and Junior 
class officers, the Head of the English Department, the 
Editor-in-chief and the Business Manager. 

Section 3 — In appointments work done as a member 
of the staff or as a contributor to the paper and the general 
record for scholarship, especially in English, shall be taken 
into consideration. 

Section 4 — The editor-in-chief, the associate editor, 
and the business manager shall be chosen from the Senior 
class. One assistant editor and one assistant business 
business manager shall be chosen from the Junior class. 
One assistant editor and one assistant business manager 
shall be chosen from the Sophomore class. 

Section 5 — The faculty adviser shall be the Senior 
class officer. 

ARTICLE III. 

Section 1 — The editor-in-chief shall be responsible for 

Page Twenty-eight 



— B1^—— IMIIWI I IIWW — —— — I HW n il iWyi Jl l W B 

tKfje College (greetingg 



the policy of the College Greetings. She shall have 
charge of the editing and shall have general supervision 
over all departments. 

Section 2 — The associate editor shall be advisory in all 
matters to the editor-in-chief, and shall have charge of the 
publication in the absence of the editor-in-chief. 

Section 3 — The associate editor and the assistant edi- 
tors shall divide the work of the various departments as 
may be convenient subject to the direction of the editor- 
in-chief. 

Section 4 — The art editor shall have charge of all 
illustrations and decorations. 

Section 5 — The Business Manager shall have entire 
charge of the advertising and the circulation departments, 
the collecting and paying out of all money. She shall 
make a report of the finances at each regular staff meeting. 

Section 6 — The Assistant Business Managers shall take 
charge of the circulation, securing of subscriptions and the 
delivering of issues, subject to the direction of the Busi- 
ness Manager. The Junior Business Manager shall have 
charge of House subscriptions and the mailing list; the 
Sophomore Business Manager shall deliver the Greetings 
to the advertisers. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Section 1 — There shall be at least one staff meeting 
a month at which proof may be read and plans discussed. 

Section 2 — The Editor shall have power to call other 
meetings when necessary. 

Section 3 — All members of the staff shall be required 
to attend all staff meetings. 

ARTICLE V. 

Section 1 — The Business Manager shall make a full 
statement of the finances of the year in the May number 
of the Greetings. 

Section 2 — Of the surplus remaining at the end of the 
year, there shall be set apart $60 to pay for the first issue 

Page Twenty-nine 




QPde CoUege ^reettns£( 



of the following year, $10 to the Junior class for decora- 
tions at commencement time, not to exceed $6 for Class 
Day programs, and a sum not to exceed $10 for a dinner 
for the outgoing and incoming staffs at which plans shall 
be discussed and information given for the benefit of the 
new staff. The remainder of the surplus shall be devoted 
tc some general college purpose of permanent value, to 
be determined by the joint incoming and outgoing staffs 
at the annual dinner as above provided. 

ARTICLE VI — AMENDMENTS. 
The Constitution may be amended by a two-thirds 
vote of the staff subject to the approval of the President 
of the College, 

><» 

Annual Report of the Business Manager of the Greetings. 

RECEIPTS. 

On hand at first of year $ 47.00 

Received from subscriptions 191.20 

Received from single copies 2.55 

Received from advertisements 500.00 



$740.75 
EXPENDITURES. 

Past Expenditures — 

Printing $3 75.92 

Incidentals 1 7.99 

Future Expenditures — 

Probable printing for May and June 100.00 

Printing for first issue next fall 60.00 

Dinner for outgoing and incoming staffs 10.00 

Class Day Programs 6.00 

Class Day Decorations 10.00 

Total Expenditures $579.91 

Balance on hand 1 70.84 

$740.75 
Page Thirty 



^i)t CoUegc (^rectingjs 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE 
COUNCIL. 

Received from organizations $1.30 

Paid out for Secretary's book 1.00 

Remainder $ .30 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT. 

The trial month of Student Government having ended 
it was voted by the students to continue this form provid- 
ing the faculty granted this permission. The approval of 
the faculty having been obtained, the students voted to 
have a new election. Senior house proctor, Mary Watson 
and Academy proctor, Lora Whitehead. 

ALUMNAE NOTES. 

Dess Mitchell, '10, is doing settlement work in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

The school at Lawrence, 111., in which Jess Camp- 
bell, '13, has been teaching, burned several weeks ago. 

Alice Briggs Hopper, '04, had a true Easter nest of 
four baby canaries, three baby ducks and seven chickens, 
all hatched Easter morn; three kittens and three baby 
rabbits. 

EXCHANGES. 

The article "The Play's the Thing" in the Sophomore 
number of the Pegasus is well worth reading. The fol- 
lowing extract might equally well apply to our exchange 
columns: "The true critic, says Matthew Arnold, should 
endeavor to learn and propagate the best that is known 
and thought in the world. He should be primarily con- 
structive." 

We congratulate Upsala for the realization of "two 

Page Thirty-one 




tS^t College ^reetingct 



dreams." So long as "hard work is Upsala's last name" 
the progress of the college is assured. 

We started to criticise the Rambler for the absence of 
all literary material this month, but as the editors inform 
us that they had a two-page story set up and had to omit 
it for lack of space, we withdraw our objections. 

"Shall I brain him ? " said the Soph — 

And the victim's courage fled. 
"You can't, he is a Freshman! 

Just hit him on the head." 

— Eureka College Pegasus. 

The alumnae number of the Western Oxford is brimful 
of good things. "The Silver-Winged Moth," a play with 
a true college setting, gives evidence of a remarkable 
delineation and appreciation of the characters. The let- 
ters and messages from "the old girls" show that the same 
loyalty and love for our Alma Mater abounds* everywhere. 

The cuts in St. Mary's Chimes are lacking in originality 
and appropriateness to the subject. 

ACCORDING TO PUNCTUATION MARKS. 



(blank) — Freshman. 



! — Sophomore. 
? — Junior. 
. — Senior. 




Page Thirty-two 



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THE TWENTY DEPARTMENTS in our store are | 

just like twenty little stores, every one dt voted to | 

the sale and display of articles For The Modkkn | 

Woman's wear. I 

Each Department makes a determined and successful I 

effort to show first the attractive NEW STYLES | 

OF THE SEASON. You'll find shopping- pleasant | 

here. i 



Kid Gloves 
Neckwear 
Fabric Gloves 
lyinen 

White Goods 
Notions 
Laces and 

Embroideries 



Corsets 

Art Goods 

Petticoats 

Handkerchiefs 

Ribbons 

Toilet Goods 

Jewelry and 



Knit Underwear 
Hosiery 

Children's Wear 
Muslin Underwear 
and Waists 
Coats and Suits 
Dresses 



Leather 






^ I 



LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINCS. 




FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

Footwear for all occasions — 
Street Shoes 

Dress Slippers 

Bed-room Slippers 

h: o i^ 1=^ El lE^ s' 

We Repair Shoes 



J. A. OBERMEYKR 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER 



THE COLLEGE STORE | 

Pennants, Stationery, Tennis Goods, Drug-s, School | 

Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory j 

Books and Photo Albums | 

"PlyEASED customers" — OUR MOTTO | 

Goods Delivered I 

Phone*: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St. and Square I 

iiiiwiHiiiiiMiiiiniHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiniimimMiiiiiiiHiHiiiiiiiiHiiNiiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiniHiniiiiuiiiMiiiiiiiiiiHuiiiiiHiMuiiiui 



jMiliiiiiiiiiiiiiininnHniimiiiimMiliilliiiiuiilimiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiHiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim^ 



Otto Speith 
pboto iportraiture 



Our Portraits were accepted and hung at the National Convention 
in Kansas City 1913 



I Formerly Watson Studio 



Southwest Corner Square | 



4 



^ROAGHi 



^ 



'ESTATE- 



iGoto 



MULLENIX & HAMILTON 

For Everything Sweet 

Hot and Cold Sodas 

216 Kast state Street 



Coover & Shreve| 

Have a complete line of | 

3 
5 

Drugs, Kodaks, Perfumes, | 
Stationery and Holiday Gifts| 

We do Developing- & Printing"! 

East and West Side Square | 



^iiiiiiiiiiniiiniiuiiitiiiiiiiiMiiiiiinii(iiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiniiniiiMniniiiMiiMiniiiiinnniiiiiininihMiiiniiiniiMiiniiiiiMiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiuiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuMHii; 



IIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIinlllinilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMlllllllllllinilllMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH^ 

The most dainty thino^s in Ring-s and Jewelry. | 

New and handsome styles of t>"oods in Steilin^- Silver | 

Hig-liest g"rades of Cut Glass, and every | 

description of Spectacles and Kye Glasses | 

Fine Diamonds a Specialty | 

at I 

RUSSELL& LYON'S | 

The Oldest Established Jewelry House in Central Illinois | 

West Side Square | 

Both Phones 96 | 





All the Faculty, Students and Friendil 


Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say 


of the College should have a CheckingI 
or Savings Account with | 


We can furnish your 
Shoes and Party Slippers 


F. G. FARRELL Sz CO.| 

i 


in the popular styles, 


BANKERS 1 
1 


leathers, and 


F. E. Farrell, President | 


fabrics 


E- E. Crabtree, Vice-President | 
H. H. Potter, Cashier 1 




M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier i 

1 



Miss C. — "Who was Frau von Stein? " 

M. B. — Frau von Stein? He was a woman." 



Concern 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAI. OCCASIONS 



WIIMIMIHMIHIHIUIUIIIIUIIUIIIIIUIIIUUIIIUIIIHUIIUIMIHHIIIUIIIIHIIIIIIIIHIHIIHUIHIUIMIIIIIIIUIUIIUUIIIUIIIIIIIUIUUIUIIIIIIMIIIIIHIIHIIUIU^ 



JiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiHMiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiimMiiiiimiiiiiiiiMililiililiiiiiMiiMiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiih 

I For those who discriminate 

i We simply suggt-st ihat it has been our constant effort to 

I please the students who come to our city. We select only the 

I best materials and prepare them with skiKuU loving care. 

I Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 

I Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

I Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 

I College functions. 

Vickery 3c Merrigan 

I CDATBREFCS 

I 227 West State Street 



|Both Phones 309 



I SAFEST PLACE TO TRADE 

IfjlLLERBY'^ 

I DRY GOODS STORE 



West Side Square 



Brady Bros. 

Kverything- in Hardware and 
Paints 



Seraphina — "Where is the pond? " 

"What pond?" 

Seraphina — "Why, it sa3'S above the sink 'All dishes 
or pans found in this sink will be put in the pond." 

Miss Miller — "Explain a capitalistic monopoly." 
Rose R. — "I can't explain it but I can tell about it." 



I The Jacksonville National Bank 

I invites your business 

I Capital . . . ^200,000 
I Surplus . . 34,000 

I Deposits . . . 1,100,000 

I U. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 

I Julius E. Strawn, President 

I Chas. B. Graff, Cashier 

I Vice-PrcBidents: T. B. Or«ar 
I H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

i J. R. Robertson 



Established 1890 




^jAck90NviLue,Ju^ 



Low Prices Square Dealing" 
Keep us busy 



.llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll IIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIHIIIIIIIIIIUIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIinillUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIHIIII 



iiHiMiiiMiiMMiiMNninMiriniiiiiiiHitiiitinNiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiMiiiiMiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiitiiriiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii' 

\ C(>ats, Suits and Skirts tailored to your individual | 

I measure and form at | 

I POPULAR PRICES I 

= s 

I All work made in our own shop by expert workmen. We | 

I g"uarantee to fit you. | 

JACKSONVILLE TAILORING COMPANY I 



233 East State Street 



Opposite Pacific Hotel 



THE ROMAN NAVY. 

"The Roman warships were compelled by oars." 
"The Roman ships had beeks." 



IHARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

Desig-ns, Cut Flowers, 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 
Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 
Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 
Greenhouses, Bell 775 



McGinn IS' | 

The Young Ladies* Shoe Store | 

vSee the '-BABY DOLL SHOE".| 
It's the Latest. | 

We carry a full line of Evening Slippers| 
in all colors. | 

If it's new, we have it | 

JAS. McGINNIS & CO.I 

East Side Square | 



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I 



Want 

Cut flowers 

FROM 



F 
E 

R 

N 
S 



JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

Both Phones 



I Classy styles 

|We will be pleased to show you our line 

I 

I FROST & NOLLEY 

i 

j Fashionable Footwear 

I For All Occasions 

I 33 South Side Sq. Jacksonville, 111. 



Job Printing 

Of All Kind s 

John K* Long | 

Engraved Cards and Invitations I 



213 West Morgan Street! 
Illinois Phone 400 | 



Miss N., furiously pushing the elevator's stop button- 
'i can't make this thing move up or down at all." 



I Dorwari Market 

I ALL KINDS OF 

X 

IFRKSH and SALT MEATS 
i FISH, POULTRY, Etc. 



i Both phones 196 



230 W. State St. 



KODAK FINISHING | 

Vulcan Roll Films [ 

Cameras from $2.00 up I 

Everything- strictly first class I 

Vail & Vail | 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 ^. Side Sq. I 



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PHOTOGRAPHER 



Successor to McCullough Bros. 



E^ast Side Square I 



Cameras, Films, Papers, 




Photo Supplies for Kodakers 
Developing, Printingf and Mounting^ 


S. S. Kresge Co.| 


at reasonable prices 


5c & IOC Store | 


Armstrongs Drug Store 


New and Up-to-Date | 


South West Corner Square 





Ruth, after cabinet meeting — "And they said — and I 
think it's a very good idea — in fact I made it myself." 



[pipe your house for 

Jacksonville Railway 
and Light Co* 

224 S. Main Street 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Art Needle Work 
and Millinery 

311 West State Street 



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I INXECSiFllTV 

IWe have built op our GROCERY and DRUG Departments on a solid 
Ifoundation of INTEGRITY. In our GROCERY and DRUGS WE 
ISAY WHAT WE BELIEVE, and our customers BELIEVE WHAT 
IWE SAY* Every item in our store is an example of PURE FOOD, 
ICLEAN FOOD, GOOD FOOD and BEST DRUGS* 
loURS is a GROCERY AND DRUG STORE with a CONSQENCE 

iPhone. 800 IE^OIBIEjIE^TS IBIE^OS. Phone. 800 

j Grocery —Pharmacy 

I 29 South Side Sq. 



fWe Sell 

iPhoenix Guaranteed 

I Silk Hosiery 



j^f^ 



a/ifnc/M 



DRY GOODS STORE 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 

A. L. Bromley 

Ladies' Tailor 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and 
Repairing. Ladies' Man Tail- 
ored Suits lo order. Remodeling 
of all kinds. Special rates to 
I. W. C. students. All work 
called for and delivered promptly 



Miss R. — "Did you say something.^ " 
E. S. — "No, 1 was just talking." 

At breakfast table — "Do you want the cooked or the 
breakfast food? " 



1 


111. Phone 57 Bell Phone 92 






Fresh Drugs, 






Fancy Goods 
Stationery 


Ideal Bread 




THE 


is better 


1 


BadQer Druo Siore 


so are the Cakes 


i 


2 doors West of Postoffice 






235 R. State Street 




SlIMIMIIIIMIIHIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIH Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 





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It will pay you to visit | 

SCHRAM'S I 

Jewelry Store | 

COLLEGE PINS, RINGS, SPOONS, ETC. I 



Len G. Magill 
Printer 

I East State Street 111. Phone 418 



yAYLORjl 

Grocery 

A g-ood place to trade | 
221 West State Street | 



Irene, one Saturday night about 9 o'clock — "Oh, it's 
student government. We can take baths until ten o'clock. 
Dorothy — "Well, go soak an hour." 



I Montgomery & Deppe | 

I IN THEIR NEW PLACE ON THE WEST SIDE OF | 
I THE SQUARE ARE SHOWING I 

I EVERYTHING IN I 

s I 

I Dry Goods and Ready-to-Wear Garments | 

I Telephone for the Fall Catalogue | 

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I College Jewel rv 

I engraved Cards and Invitations 

I Chafing Dislies, Copper and Brass Goods 
I Special Die Stationery 

I 21 South Side Square 



I Piepenbrings Variety Store 

I One block east of College 

I HERE TO PLEASE 

I Candies Cakes 

I Cookies Pies 

I Sandwiches Pop on Ice 

I Groceries California Fruits 

I School Supplies 




DKUinERs. 



Jacksonville's foremost Men's Store 

Mackinaw and Sweater Coat 

Mannish Cut and Form Fitting 

Hand Bags, Suit Cases and 
Trunks 

I. W. C. Banners and Pillow 
SPECIAL DESIGNS ON REQUEST 



Miss Beebe, assigning topics in Musical History — "And 
when you have written your paper, put a bibliography at 
the end." 

F. H. — "Of ourselves?" 



jLadies' Late Style Sweater 
i Coats 



C. S.MARTIN 



Are Sold by 



prank Byrns 



Hat 

Store 



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Wall Paper, Painting 

and Interior Decorating" 

Pictures and Frames 

314 W. state St., Scott Block 
Jacksonville, 111. 

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Cafe 



Confectionary 



Ipcacock Inn 



Catering- 



Soda 



Candies 



SKIRT BOXES 
ROCKERS. SCREENS, 

DESKS AND 
EED ROOM CURTAINS 

AT 

lohnson, Hackett & Guthrie 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



College Girls 

Who Admire 

•tylish made Clothes should 
visit the new 

Royal Ladies' Tailors 

Opposite Post Office on East State St. 

you will find here such made clothes a* 
»re only seen in metropolitian centers. 



SHOES 



SLIPPERS 



The only Popular Price Shoe Store| 

in the city i 

The only Shoe Store catering to! 

special orders | 

The newest shoes for the least | 

money | 

JOHNSON BROS. | 

Under Farrell'* Bank W. State & Sq.| 



SHEET MUSIC, MUSIC MERCHANDISE \ 

I TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS i 

I AND SUPPLIES I 

19 SOUTH SIDB PUBUC SQUARE I 

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I J. BART JOHNSON 

i Everything Musical 

j PIANOS, PLAYER PIANOS, VICTROLAS, 

I IMPORTER OF VIOLINS, AND A COMPLETE 
I LINE OP MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 



I 49 South Side Square 



|Dr. Albyn LiNCoiyN Adams 

I Oculist and Aurist 

I to the State School for the Blind 

I 323 West State Street 



Practice limited to diseases of the 
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



DR. ALPHA B. APPLEBE 
Dentist 

336 West state St. 



Note left in girl's room by Miss R — "Hang up your 
clothes under the bed." 



DR. BYRON S. GAILEY 

EYE, EAR, 
NOSE AND THROAT 



OflSce and Residence 
340 West State Street 



PACIFIC 

Jacksonville's Best and most 
Popular 

HOTE L 

The Home of the Traveling Man 
Jno. B. Snell, Prop. 
Rates $2.25, 1(2.50, and $3.00 per day 
One Block West of Woman's College 
Opposite Post Office 
Rooms with or without bath 
lyocal and Ivong Distance Telephone 

in every room. 



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Andre & Andre | 

Kverythinjjf in | 

High Grade House Furnishingi 

for E)verybody, E^verywhere | 

46-50 North Side Square I 






^. A. SCHOEDSACK 


CAFE BATZ 


Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 


And Annex for Ladies 


Dry Cleaning of Fancy 




Waists and Dresses 


221-223 E)ast State Street 


a Specialty 


Uinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 


230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111. 




Illinois Phone 388 



Miss K., on Wednesday, speaking proudly — "I've lost 
three pounds since Saturday." 

F. M., in surprise — "Wliy, Miss K., you'll evaporate." 



Florence Kirk King 
Hair Dresser 

Special Service iii Shampooing 
Scalp Treatment, Manufacturing 
Hair into Latest Styles 

Work done by appointment 
111. Phone 837 503 W. College St. 



iiiHiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 



Cherry's Livery I 

Finest Light and Heavy! 

Livery | 

Lowest Rates I 

235-237, 302-304-306 North Main Stieetf 
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiimiiiNiiiiiiMmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiMMiiiiiiiiiiMiMiiiiiR 



iMHiiiniiHJiiiiiiiiiiiniMniiiiiiirinniniiMiriMMiiiirnirininniiiniHininnMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiJiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiMiMriniiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiniriitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiMiiiiiiMiiin 



I Girlst Patronize our Advertisers 



Ayers National Bank 

Founded 1852 



C.ipital 
Z^200,000 

Surplus 
$90,000 




Deposits 
$1,2^0,000 

United States 
Depository 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 

Special Window for Ladies 
Ladies' Waiting- Room 
We make a feature of Ladies' Accounts, and have 
provided facilities for their exclusive use 



OFFICERS 
M. F. Dunlap, President O. F. Buffe, Cashier 

Andrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 

R. M. Hockenhull, Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst. Cashier 

C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 



Owen P. Thompson 
Edward F. Goltra 
John W. Leach 



DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhull 
M. F. Dunlap 



Harry M. Capps 
O. F. Bnffe 
Andrew Russel 



Siiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimimiiiitiiiimiiiiiiimmimiiiiiriitiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiii 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 

Erected 1860 



Exieneion 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



LLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

College ot Liberal Arts [ 

(Full classical and scientific courses) | 

College ot Music [ 

School of Fine Arts [ 

School oi Expression [ 

School of Home Economics [ 

IQ^A Standard College — one of the best. [ 

Regular college and academy courses [ 

leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- I 

inently a Christian college v/ith every | 

facility for thorough work. Located = 

in the Middle West, in a beautiful, i 

dignified, old college town, noted for i 

its literary and music atmosphere. | 

Let us have names of your friends | 

who are looking for a good college. I 

Call or address. Registrar I 

Illinois Woman's College, [ 

Jacksonville, 111. i 




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®f)e College (greetingfii 

€|| The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 

€j| Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the twentieth of each month. 

•}] Subscriptions, |i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
€(| Entered ai Jacksonville PostoflSce as second class matter. 

Contents 

Greetings Klection 3 

Editorial "It" 3 

Commencement 4 

Every Senior at Commencement Time 5 

Locals . . 19 

May Day Contest 20 

Cartoon 21 

Greetings Breakfast. 22 

Track Meet 22 

Electra 23 

Installation Student Government 23 

Parties 

Miss Mothershead at Home to Seniors 25 

Porch Party — Erma Elliott 25 

Breakfast at Peacock Inn — Miss Johnston 25 

My Waste Basket 25 

Society Notes 

Phi Nu 26 

Belles L,ettres 26 

Theta Sigma 28 

I^ambda Mu 28 

Academea 29 

Department Notes 

College of Music 29 

Report of Y. W. C. A 30 

Report of Endowment Fund 30 

Extract from "Chums" 31 

Elections 31 

Thh 
Grapbic''Arts 

COMCBRN 




Uo /IDars ^obnston 
the Greetings Staff and Senior Class 

Dedicate 
this number of the College Greetings. 



Ilbe (College c^reetings 



Vol. XVII Jacksonville, 111., June, 1914 No. 9 



Faculty Committee— Miss Mothershead, Miss Baker, MIm 

Johnston. 
Editor — Abbie Peavoy 

Associate Editors — Erma Elliott, Helena Munson, Helen McGhee 
Business Managbrs — Geneva Upp, Winifred Burmeister, Alma 

Harmel 



GREETINGS BOARD ELECTION. 

Editor-in-Chief — Helena Munson. 

Associate Editor — Winifred Burmeister. 

Senior Business Manager — Audrey Berryman. 

Junior Editor — Helen McGhee. 

Junior Business Manager — Alma Harmel. 

Sophomore Editor — Elaine Buhrman, 

Sophomore Business Manager — Mary Harrison. 

For the new staff the old staff in resigning their places 
to them are wishing to them all our successes without our 
failures, and congratulating them for the opportunity they 
have to work toward making the College Greetings the 
best college paper that is possible for a college paper to be. 

IT. 

Some time ago your curiosity was aroused by the tan- 
talizing posters found on your way to the dining room. 
Questioning, you sought to be enlightened as to what "It" 
was and how you were to get "It." Later another lot of 
posters told you to "Get It on the Brain" and "To Keep 

Page Three 



Wi}t College Greetings 



w 



It." Later you found that it all had to do with a mass 
meeting in the chapel. There you found that "It" was 
"ginger, pep or enthusiasm." It was contagious. If 
you hadn't brought it you caught it. Excitement reigned 
even the scramble for the Junior banner until one might 
have thought of Emmeline P. going after suffrage. But 
a class rush was not the purpose of the meeting. Its 
object was bigger than a class celebration. You found 
that its purpose was to begin a New Student Campaign. 
Many of you pledged to do your part to swell the College 
walls with new students. Have you written those prom- 
ised letters? Was yours bonfire enthusiasm or are you 
going to keep "It" and work all summer to bring back 
with you others to live in these College walls? 



I 



?'! 



COMMENCEMENT. 

The fact that one less day has been given for the 
commencement exercises made the days more full than 
ever before. Beginning with the Academy Commence- 
ment exercises on Friday night, every minute of the time 
has been filled with exercises and reunions. Pleasant it 
was to see the students of former years walking about the 
halls enjoying their temporary return to the College 
Home. Saturday was a day set aside for the Art and 
Domestic Science department exhibition. Here, as in the 
concert given by the Seniors on Monday night, credible 
work done for themselves and the College was exhibited. 
On Sunday morning at Centenary Dr. Baker of Urbana 
preached the Baccalaureate Sermon to the Senior class 
on the text "All things are yours." Very optimistic was 
the impression left on the audience especially to the Sen- 
iors to whom going out from college seems to be a giving 
up of something precious instead of an acquisition. 

At the Alumnae Association meeting Monday after- 
noon the Seniors were taken into the Association. A 
business meeting in combination with a program was held, 

Page Pour. 



t!Di)e CoOese ^reettngK 




after which refreshments were served in the reception 
room. 

Again, on Tuesday morning the procession formed. 
To Music Hall it went for the final exercises of the year. 
Dr. Butler, after a musical number by the Swarthouts and 
Miss Shastid, a vocal solo by Mrs. Helen Brown Read, 
delivered a commencement address which every Senior 
and every hearer could adopt for personal use. 

CLASS DAY PROGRAM. 

Every Senior at Commencement Time. 

(Morality Play.) 

CHARACTERS. 

Records Abigail Peavoy 

Every Senior Letta Irwin 

History Mary Watson 

Prophecy Clara Kelly 

Will Erma Elliott 

College Spirit Geneva Upp 

1914 Senior Hallie Clem 

PROLOGUE. 
[Setting — College campus. Nine o'clock in the 
morning before the bleachers. Seniors, led by Juniors 
between Freshmen carrying daisy chains, march across 
the campus all singing college song. Freshmen and Jun- 
iors are seated in background. Seniors come to front 
where a table which holds a scales and diploma has been 
placed.] 

I pray you all give audience 

And hear this matter with reverence 
■ By figure of a moral play — 

Every Senior at commencement time called it is 

That of their lives and ending shows 

How transitory is their day. 

The story saith, "College girls in the beginning, 

Look well and take good heed of the ending 

Page Five 




^^t CoOese Greetings; 




If you would graduates be. 

Ye think frolics in the beginning- full sweet 

Which in the end causeth your soul to weep 

When your college days have passed away." 

Here ye shall see how History and Prophecy, 

Will, College Spirit with democracy. 

Led Every Senior to this Class Day 

Give heed and listen well what the doth say. 

Records — 
Stand still, Every Senior, whither goest thou thus sadly, 
Hast thou commencement forgot? 

Every Senior — 
Nay, not forgot, but remembered full heavily 
And coming with reluctant feet since 
Loath am I my college for to leave. 
Why askest thou? 

Records — 
That will 1 show thee. 
I was sent to thee by Faculty. 

Every Senior — 
What desirest the Faculty of me? 

Records — 
That will 1 also show thee. 
A reckoning they needs will have 
Of thy four years 
Why thou shouldst graduate. 

Every Senior — 
Full ready am I such a reckoning to give. 
I know thee not. What messenger art thou ? 

Records — 
I am your past Records. 
Every Senior 1 arrest and no one spare. 
For it is Faculty Commandment 
That all to me should be obedient 
And their credentials in the balance lay, 
E'er their diploma they bear away. 

Every Senior — 
I have many things to offer thee. Thru 

Page Six 




tBi}t College ^ttttingi 



Vly four years at this my Alma Mater 
Constantly have I worked, nor ever ceased, 
So that by now a goodly heritage is mine. 
But how may I my worthiness 
To thee prove? 

Records — 
By placing thy credentials here in the balance. 

Every Senior — 
In iaith, thou art a kindly messenger. 
'Tii easy for me thy demands to meet. 
Wifri me I have the very things ye seek. 
My :redits, slowly piled up by much labor. 
Oh low I see why 1 have striven so long, 
Andwhy to my task I have been true, 
Evei though thoughtless wishes beckoned me away. 
VVhife other things have entered in 
To nake my college memories sweet 
'Twas after all for this that I came here, 
To gain more knowledge and to labor towards 
An A B. as the summit of my desires. 
Proul am I, for surely these my credits 
Willnore than outweigh the requirements 
For : first degree. Take them and see — 
Do tiey not balance? 

(Records places credits in scales.) 

Records — 
Nay, there is a great lack. Is this all thou hast to offer? 

Every Senior — 
Consernation overwhelms me. Can it be 
Thatsomething more than study is required 
Of hm that from college would graduate? 
All inprepared am I further offerings 
To nake. What shall I do? How can I 
Swel my account? Oh, say, I know 
Of (ue thing that perhaps might help, 
It isthe History of My Past. 

Records — 
'Ti; well she cometh now this way. 

Page Seven 






lEi^t CoUtse ^xntinzs 



History, what hast thou that thou canst offer Every Senior 
That she mayst graduate? 

Every Senior — j 

Ah, good History, 'tis well indeed thou comest. 
For I am in great jeopardy and need 
Of something more this scales to balance 
Properly. Be you a friend in need. 

History (unrolls scroll and reads) — 
The History of the past yields forth most gloriously 
Many a deed of rightful worth and praise. 
From Freshman to Senior days we have 
Past through much that unto us glory is. 
Full four years e'er by now it is 
Since we a merry troop 
A Freshman day didst institute in morning chapel here. 
Our merriment somewhat subdued by tests both long and 

hard 
The which to regain we turned our attention then 
We gave a party to our upper classmen, 
A masquerade full bright and free of care 
The while our college worked for library fund. 
Our class it was that gave the first pageant, 
A pantomime of merriment and joy right full. 
Soon after which we marched in stately rows 
With ivy chains upon our shoulders hung 
Beside the Seniors grave in cap and gown. 
The next year, as did become a class of one year's striding 
We entered chapel, more formally, with bands of gnen 
Our class colors broadly proclaiming 
The which we wore on the occasions 
Such as appeared most seemly — 
Especially one that we will mention here, 
A glorious day for this our college dear. 
When Dr. Welch to us his organ gave. 
Of all the fetes that stand forth prominently on thij our 

Sophomore year. 
We call to mind the essay contest 
Time to us of great rejoicing 

Page Eight 




Wf)t CoHtge ^reettngsi 




For first prize we won, and, forsoothe, deserved it — 

The next year still we kept this honor up 

For first again to our deserving classmate fell. 

And when the campaign for endowment did begin — 

As Juniors we stood ready to do all that lay within our 

power. 
Of time and money gave we freely 
But more powerful than these our loyalty and college 

spirit true. 
This year began a round of parties gay, 
Receptions, dinners, camp fire feasts and all. 
As Seniors entered we the chapel clad in cap and gown. 
The faculty preceding us in state. 
But lest our dignity on us too much oppress. 
To Lake Matanzas forth we sallied. 
A new adventure to under classmen forbid. 
A year of hard work full of duties only Seniors know 
Interrupted now and then by gaieties 
Till finally with spring returning joy 
Arbor Day approached and we desired a memorial to leave 
That thru the years to come might live and grow, 
Planted an elm within the campus bounds. 
In our four years of enterprise new there have been many 
Destined to last and come to greater strength, 
Self government, two new societies of college rank, 
A revived association for athletics. 
The service circle, a tent full at Geneva, 
The college council and a new endowment fund. 
The first of these most promising and important in our list, 
House government by our students. 
The which we think our college spirit and loyalty increased. 
(Turns toward Every Senior) 
Well, Every Senior, I have done for thee what I can. 
And by thee ever will I stand. 
No man without his past can forward step. 
But when his past is glorious like to thine 
Then truly may he with great strides progress. 
(Hands scroll to Records, who places it in the balance.) 

Page Nine 



Wfit College ^reettngtf 



Every Senior — 
There, good friend, Does it not balance? 

Records — 
Nay, there is still great lack. What more hast thou to 

offer? 

Every Senior — 
1 have possessions inherited from those 
That went before and likewise some 
Gained by myself to pass on to others. 

Records — 
Who holdst these gifts to give? 

Every Senior — 
'Tis Will, who Cometh now in good time. 
Will, 'tis demanded of me a reckoning 
Of my college days to give. What canst thou 
Place in the balance to weigh it down ? 

Will— 
Ye perceive here Every Senior in her majesty, 
To whom all creatures have been most kind. 
Coming here with an abundance of worldly prosperity. 
Of various riches full in her mind. 
Now a pilgrimage she must on her take 
Which she in no wise may escape. 
With her does she bring a sure reckoning 
Without delay or any tarrying. 
Full ready is she such reckoning to give 
Of how she has thought and how lived. 
Full four years has she spent 
Upon her labor duly bent. 
Her text books right well has she scanned. 
Deeply into their lore has she delved. 
The knowledge which she has so gained 
Leaveth she unto no man 
But taketh it e'en unto her journey's end. 
But unto one and all does she commend 
That they likewise delve and scan. 
Not for thee can she heap up treasures 
That thou needest to take on thy journey; 
She may, however, prepare thy way 

Page Ten 



turtle College ^rtttin^si 






That thou mayest spend thy hfe likewise 
In search of knowledge which is full sweet. 
Pleasures, too, has she received in full store 
That have cheered her when grieved full sore. 
The memory of these shall indeed endure — 
Of that henceforth ye may be quite sure — 
But the pleasures also must abide behind 
That they may cheer thy spending of time. 
If on them thou dost set all thy mind 
Thy reckoning they will make blotted and blind. 
If thou however lovest them moderately 
And with the sad shareth them heartily. 
Then shalt thou free from sorrow be. 
The honors which Every Senior has received in full 
number 



Beareth she not with her into the world wide I 

But leaveth them unto those followers most fit ' 

In dignity, cap and gown a while to reside. ; 

Every Senior has lived not after her own pleasure 

Without exploring Friendship's rich treasure. ;' 

Friends which she in prosperity did find [ 

And who in adversity did remain full kind 

Must she leave, e'en though she them do need. ! 

Every Sophomore who did her so comfort 

To whom for help did she freely resort, ! 

Every Senior now entrusts to the class of 1918 I 

Saying: "Mayest thou take the labor 

And do so much for her as she for me. 

Pray thee, help her in all necessity 

And bear with her when in most need." 

At the beginning Every Senior right happily did find 

A worthy adviser, wise, gracious and kind, 

With whom she oft did counsel take 

Whether it be concerning deeds or words spake. 

But now that she must forthwith speed 

Whither this adviser can neither go nor speak 

Every Senior wills to whatever follower worthy be 

This counselor who her hath helped right well. 

Page Eleven 



r ij ^* CoUeae ^reettngtf |IJLI 

Senior privileges and tables in goodly score 

Must she likewise relinquish e'er she depart 

For to go on that journey unto worlds wide. 

May Every Junior, then, in the same wise 

Make use of them in all manner wight. 

The colors which she e'en so well did choose, 

The white and the green, may she no longer use. 

Then does she give both fair and lovingly 

Unto one who now enters strong and hopefully 

The course which she now does complete. 

Senior Prep, wilt thou them take 

And tho' thy pilgrimage be ever so gay, 

Ne'er part with them e'en for a day. 

May they bide with thee also 

And ne'er part thee from. 

Unto the College, which she does so love, 

Every Senior desires to bequeath 

Faith, Loyalty, Service, forevermore. 

Them does she not leave as idle gifts 

But will use them herself forthwith. 

However, wherever destiny her ends may shape 

To others likewise does she commend 

To use these gifts in all manner wight, 

For only by use are they in security 

To afford satisfaction in full surety. 

If now this reckoning be quite clear. 

Then shall not Every Senior pass into that broader sphere 

Unto the which ye each shall come 

That preparest thy account full soon ? 

Every Senior — 
Gramercy, my ever faithful friend. 
How weigh now the balances? 

Records — 
There is still need of greater worth. 

Every Senior — 
Perhaps it might help that I have before me 
My future held by Prophecy. 

Records — 

Page Twelve 




tB^e College 6reettng£( 




'Tis well. 

Every Senior — 
Ah, come hither, Phophecy. For me 
Thou canst do much if thou but will. 

Prophecy — 
Willing am I to render service to Every Senior. 

Records — 
The time is mete for thy service. 

(Prophecy steps forward and reads from scroll.) 
Willing am I to render service to Every Senior. 
'Tis gladly given. 
Every Senior, at your nearest call 
Have I remained through all 
The spirit of Prophecy grim and gray 
The spirit of Prophecy bright and gay. 
Not only things of good report 
But various things of darker sort 
Have I foreseen. 

Since your first days in the college home 
Thou have I never left alone 
But lessons good or bad foretold. 
And plans for pleasures bold. 
Oft with tantalizing pride 
Have I the very facts decried 
That made you blue all day. 
And oft my spirit bore you up 
Overflowing your joyous cup 
With pleasures rare. 
Through my guidance 
Thou hast been prepared 
For great and small things. 
'Twas mine to foretell what the end would be 
And cause thee thy daily tasks to see, 
Which was well met. 

Since I have been with thee for full four years 
And hast shared alike thy joys and tears 
I come now to reveal to thee 
What thy future yet will be. 

Page Thirteen 



Wiit CoUese Greetings; 




Every Senior, list to what I say — 

A bright and happy Commencement Day 

I prophesy. 

Then when thou enterest broader life 

Thou shalt be prepared for any strife, 

Oh Every Senior. 

When thou lookest back on her years just through, 

Filled with courage and loyalty true. 

Full well you may know 

That this spirit will grow 

When she reaches new fields to serve. 

The '14 Senior will have great fame, 

And well is she worthy of the name. 

Not confined to college halls. 

Not limited by school room walls 

Shall her success be. 

In every place where woman serves 

Will she be found with ready hand 

For every noble cause to stand. 

Our Alma Mater, though she now leaves you, 

Her college spirit will keep her true 

Wher'ere she be. 

With earnest pride will she hear retold 

Of thy success since the days of old. 

Thy glory will her glory be. 

A large endowment will make her stand supreme. 

But not by this alone, 

But with better equipment manned 

As her future success shall demand — 

A new college hall where each student comes 

With eager pride, 

A new gymnasium and society homes. 

These and much more shall her power increase. 

Add to this, that of greatest worth 

Without the which all is vain spent. 

True college spirit and self-government 

For every student. 

Every Senior, I have caused thee to see 

Page Fourteen 



ta^ift CoQege ^vtttinQi 



Full well the course of thy future to be. 
As thou hast been faithful in times just gone, 
So prove thyself in the things to come, 
Living and striving with good demeanor, 
I leave thee to fate, 1914 Senior. 

(Records shakes her head as she places scroll in 
balance.) 

Every Senior — 
Alas! not yet is the balance even! 
Oh, History! Prophecy! Will! can you not yet 
Bring added store my plight to ease? 

History — 
Where is thy College Spirit? 

Every Senior — 
I have forgot my best, my College Spirit, 
Ever near me. 

College Spirit — 
Why hast thou forgotten me 
That have been ever with thee? 

Records — 
Tis ever thus. 

Our nearest good is oft forgotten, 
Stands ready, waiting to be summoned. 
While other aid is sought. 
Yet willingly is service given 
Lest all should come to naught. 

College Spirit — 
Nevertheless 1 will help thee in whatever way I can. 
Through all your college life 
Have I ever been with you 
Though sometimes unrecognized. 
Four years ago I started. 
Endeavoring to instill within you 
The full meaning of college spirit. 
I am indefinable. 
Yet miraculous power I hold. 
Supreme 1 stand majestically. 
Above all group spirit which is strong, 

Page Fifteen 




Wtt CoUese ^vtttinufi 



Above all class spirit which binds us fast, 

Above all society spirit bound to last. 

A summit am I 

Reached only by graduated steps. 

If college spirit you embody 

Discipline you will not need, 

For only deeds which are noble and good. 

Best for the interests of our Alma Mater, 

Does College Spirit propose. 

Loyalty my second name is, 

Loyalty, which means response 

To every college activity. 

Even tho not fully understood 

Still further truly seems the test 

When measuring up to your best 

Petty desires you put aside 

For the one is only small 

While the College towers over all. 

If College Spirit is your guide 

Scholarship will be your pride. 

For higher ideals you will seek, 

For college standards to make broad 

To limits of infinity. 

Every Senior high my place, 

Your greatest acts do we embrace 

Not in ideal words am I expressed 

But noble deeds of right, true, best. 

To show enthusiasm in every way 

To be embodied in every act 

While in college is not my only work. 

Where'er I go I carry the ideal of my Alma Mater, 

Not only in loyalty to her 

In time of financial crisis, 

Not only in helping maintain her 

By sending her students to carry on my work. 

But her fame still further I carry 

By giving to others far and near 

The very best that is in me. 

Page Sixteen 




tS^e College ^reettngst 




Listen, Every Senior, 

Of greatest moment is this — 

I would teach you 

Not for your personal benefit 

But the glory and fame to carry 

Of this college which loyally stood 

Four years behind you. 

Every Senior, to me greatest attention give. 

Behind you stands not personal self 

But a halo of brightest light 

Which from head to foot enshrines you. 

From a shield is this reflected 

Bearing the three shining words, "Knowledge, Faith, Ser- 
vice." 

Along life's path we go 

Directed by this motto. 

To it ever will you remain 

Faithful, loyal and true. 

Your great watchword shall be 

That which stands above all else to thee. 

Knowledge, faith, service. 

Records (placing the scroll of College Spirit in 
balance) — 

Tis well. Thy reckoning is true. 

The balance is full well — 

Thy labors long and preparation 

Well warrants now your graduation. 

Yet e'er thy diploma's granted 

May the College vine be planted 

According to custom old and strong. 

Who wilt thou have this rite perform for you 

And the oration of the vine go through? 
Every Senior — 

The 1914 Senior will I have, 

She of the present year. 
Records — 

With her let this little band. 

Will, History, Prophecy and College Spirit, join hands, 

Who brought thee to this day. 

Page Seventeen 




^t)e CoQege ^xtttixiQi 



(All circle about tree at foot of which the vine is to 
be planted.) 

1914 Senior steps forward and reads — 

As the closing part of every class day is usually the 
planting of the ivy, we are observing the same custom to- 
day, with a change from the ivy to the wild grape vine. 
This branch is a cutting from one great vine just as our 
lives are cuttings from this one institution. We plant this, 
which will bloom in all its fragrance, thus symbolizing our 
hopes that our lives may blossom into fruitful deeds; and 
as this vine extends from tree to tree, may the work we 
undertake grow and spread into true worth and usefulness. 

College Spirit (taking spade) — 
Here, Every Senior, at the foot of this lovely tree 
This vine will plant 
A symbol of your victory fairly won. 
A symbol of your work well done 
You'll leave to others yet to be, 
Of grace and beauty by this tree. 

Will (taking spade) — 
To others' care we'll leave this vine. 

Prophecy (putting in a spadeful of earth) — 
She will spread from tree to tree 
Filling the whole campus with beauty. 

History — 
This vine planting starts a new epoch 
In your life, Every Senior. 

Every Senior — 
Kind friends, without you I could never graduate. 
To History, Prophecy, Will, and College Spirit 
I owe much without which 1 should have been lost, 
And so I thank you for your timely help. 
And now in celebration of my triumph 
Let us, supported by our nearest class, 
Join heart and voices in singing our class song. 

(Freshmen rise and join in class song.) 

Page Eighteen 




Wtt CoUege (Jlreetingg 




EPILOGUE. 

Our play you have heard to the end. 

We hope you have enjoyed it, friends. 

For every Senior's deeds are told 

According- to Class Day custom, new yet old. 

For every Senior's race is done. 

By faithful help is prize is won. 

And those things which to Class Day belong 

In a new way without being- long. 

Now if in your places you will stay 

You may watch us march away. 

(Seniors march away up the campus between daisy 
chains.) 

LOCALS. 

Miss Neville left Sunday to finish preparations for her 
trip abroad. The good wishes of the College go with her. 

Miss Ella Hammell and Arlene Hammell have been 
guests of the College for almost a week before starting to 
Boston, where they will join Miss Neville's party on the 
Canopic. 

Many have been the visitors these last weeks. The 
1913 class were represented at commencement by Helen 
Moore, Elizabeth Dunbar, Lois Coultas, Emily Jayne 
Allen Fay, Anne Heist, Beryl Vickery, Sieverdena Harmel, 
Mayme Severns, May Heflin, Constance Loar, Norma 
Virgin, Nell Taylor. 

The Misses Bullard spent part of commencement week 
at the College. 

Friends and parents of the graduates have been pres- 
ent with us, Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Watson of Sauk Center, 
Minnesota, Mr. and Mrs. Irwin of Tuscola, Mr. and Mrs. 
Kelly, Miss Mame Peavoy, Mrs. Martha Haller have num- 
bered among the College guests. 



Page Nineteen 



Ctie College ^vtttinzsi 



MAY DAY. 

Showers threatening kept the hearts of all excited on 
the twelfth of May, but clear skies were over our May Day 
ceremonies. The harmony of color, the rhythm of move- 
ment in the drills, the dignity of the procession and reces- 
sional made the May Day of 1914 the lovliest of college 
ceremonies. 

. CONTEST. 

Rah! Rah! Rah! Two prizes for the Sophomore 
class in the Wesley Mathers contest. First prize to Helen 
McGhee, second to Miriam Akers. 




Page Twenty 




tIDfje CoUege (greetings! 




GREETINGS BREAKFAST. 

Another step in advance for the Greetings was taken 
Tuesday morning, May 12, when the out-going and in- 
coming staffs together with the electoral committee met 
at the Peacock Inn. Over coffee, waffles and other good 
things many plans and ideas were exchanged. The new 
staff was made to feel what lies before them in an entirely 
different way than any foregoing staff, doubtless. As 
past troubles were told, in order that future similar ones 
may be avoided, no other spirit than that of hope, deter- 
mination and enthusiasm was aroused. Abbie Peavoy, 
Erma Elliott and Geneva Upp made short talks on the 
present standard of the Greetings and its aspirations for 
the future. In a brief interesting way Dr. Marker told of 
how our college paper, a real student activity, has grown 
from a small alumnae pamphlet of which he was the edi- 
tor, business manager and staff. Several amendments 
to the new constitution were made and one hundred dol- 
lars of this year's surplus given as a nest egg for a perma- 
nent library endowment fund. 

From the Peacock Inn v/e went to the Courier office. 
The linotype machines were extremely interesting as ex- 
plained to us. Each member of the staff was given her 
name in metal for a souvenir. 

Altogether the morning was one of profit and interest 
to all. The new staff came home with a firmer deter- 
mination that at the end of next year it could still be said 
of the Greetings, "It has been better this year than ever 
before." Without a doubt the clause in the new constitu- 
tion that provided for such a morning had proved a suc- 
cess. Next year's Greetings will have to prove its last- 
ing effects. 

>^ 
TRACK MEET. 

The 25th of May was marked on the College calendar 
for the track meet. Early in the morning of that day girls 
ran about the campus in gym bloomers and middies and 
Page Twenty-two 




tlTfie CoOege ^vtttinQsi 



practised for the various events. At 9:15 the basketball 
game was called and was won after many excellent plays 
by Martha Kost's team. Then followed the fifty-yard 
dash, the hurdles, the hundred-yard dash, high jump, the 
shot put, broad jump and relay race. The winners in 
these events were presented with pins bought by the Ath- 
letic Association. In the baseball game the class spirit 
was very evident. After a rousing game the Freshmen 
won with a score of 42-15. The Illinois College students 
celebrated their victory in a bigger track meet on our 
campus with songs and yells, adding much to the general 
good time. The enthusiasm was great and every girl 
showed that she had "It." 

The records made were as follows: Running broad 
jump, 12 ft. 6 in.; running high jump, 4 ft.; hop, step and 
jump, 2 3 ft. 10 in. ; shot put, 2 3 ft. 10 in. 

ELECTRA. 

In the pretty setting on the campus of Illinois College 
the Dramatic Club presented the Greek play Electra. 
The characters were students from the various institutions 
of learning of Jacksonville, our College furnishing the 
girls for the chorus. In the presentation and interpreta- 
tion of Greek setting and atmosphere much credit is due 
both to those who took part in the play and to those who 
took upon themselves the training and preparation. 

INSTALLATION OF SENIOR PROCTOR. 

At the last mass meeting of the students, Thursday 
evening, May 28, Miss Hess was installed as Senior Proc- 
tor for next year. Miss Watson, the present Senior Proc- 
tor, in addressing the students, spoke of the difficulty of 
organizing this new form of government. Although we 
have had suggestions from other colleges, we have had to 
make our own adaptations to meet the situation in our 
College. She spoke of the organization of the govern- 

Page Twenty-three 



m 



tE^te CoUes^ ^reettnssi 



ment in its temporary form, of the difficulties encountered 
during the year, and the progress, the growth of spirit, in 
spite of these difficulties. After an appeal to the students 
for loyalty to and earnest support of this new organization 
Miss Watson handed the gavel to Miss Hess as the insignia 
of her office. 

I hardly know Avhat to say. I don't intend to make a 
speech at all, but to thank you for the appreciation shown. 
I do want to say how much I appreciate the efforts of 
Mary, my sister in this office, for everything that she has 
done. I think you girls realize that it has not been an 
easy matter. She has spoken of the difficulties that we 
encounter as organizers of this government and 1 wonder 
if you girls really realize the great advantage and the great 
privilege that is ours, having this government. It is not 
student government. I like to call it self-government 
better. It sounds more that each one of us is a woman 
who is living up to her best and is trying to help the girls 
next to her, or across the corridor. 

As Mary has already said, 1 do believe that the girls 
are not feeling it is a proctorship government any more. 
Next year we hope to have not house government but a 
general student self-government. 

I intend to do my very best for you and for myself and 
that means the College, for we are the college. It isn't 
the building, and it isn't the campus, and it isn't the fac- 
ulty, but it is us, and it's up to us to make this a success, 
and when I say success I do not mean a following of the 
rules and regulations kept in this book. It is simply as 
someone said a while ago, living out the natural way. 
Student government is the natural thing in a woman's col- 
lege. We aren't boarding school girls any more. Next 
Fall when the new girls come I want you as a student body 
to make the girls feel what we stand for. I think that 
student government or self-government is the only way to 
encourage that. 

I am now going to ask that those proctors who will be 
back next Fall, if they will rise to show that they will stand 

Page Twenty-four 



^ije CoUcge ^vtetinQi 




to keep the office they now hold in helping me next Fall, 
to act in the same way they are now acting. Are you 
willing to give the same support that the proctor's are 
doing? 

Pledge of loyalty to the College and to Student Gov- 
ernment. 

To Miss Mothershead the Seniors are indebted for a 
very pleasant evening spent with her in the society halls. 
Curiosity she aroused by the maze of strings and the in- 
teresting name cards. Much merriment was provoked by 
the guessing of parts of the body. Delighted were the 
participators by the dainty tables and place cards, the 
green of the degree seniors and the lavendar of the spe- 
cial seniors mingling together in their decorations. The 
little vases filled with syringa v/e were given as favors and 
remembrances of the evening. 

Many gay times have the Seniors enjoyed these last 
days. One of the pleasantest, most restful times was the 
evening spent on the Elliott porch on Thursday evening, 
in the cool twilight, apart from the maddening crowds of 
examination takers and responsibilities. 

On Wednesday morning, May twenty-seventh, at half 
past eight. Miss Johnston entertained the Seniors at break- 
fast at the Peacock Inn. White roses and dainty place 
cards formed a pretty setting for the delicious breakfast 
served. Even the big appetites for which some members 
of the class are famous could scarcely do justice to the 
occasion. 

MY WASTE BASKET. 

This evening I have been looking at my old waste 
basket as it humbly stands beneath the table. It is an 
inexpensive looking affair, that old basket, but it is brim- 
Page Twenty-five 



tE'tt Collcse (Jlrectingfl! 



^^^ 



ful of memories. It has cheerfully received and hidden 
from sight my failures in themes, in translations, and in 
tests. There are secrets that only my waste basket and 
I share, for we are firm friends. It must be confessed 
that my basket, human-like, has faults. There was a 
time when the basket's too greedy mouth hid an entire 
week's cookery notes, and again its open sides leaked salt 
across the freshly swept floor. Nevertheless, my basket 
seldom failed me in time of great difficulty, nor soon shall 
I forget how quietly it held a stack of dirty dishes while 
the inspector's eye roved around the room. Now though 
its useful days are ended, when I look at its forlorn sides 
I dread to part with my comrade, for the basket brings 
back a year of work, friends and fun. 

May Blackburn, '16. 

PHI NU. 

The election and installation of Phi Nu officers was 
held on the last Tuesday of the school year. Irene Crum 
was elected president; Ruth Harper, vice-president; Mar- 
garet Kuck, recording secretary; Alice Tombaugh, corre- 
sponding secretary; Winifred Burmeister was re-elected 
treasurer; Marie Miller, chaplain; Peril Hess, critic; Marion 
Newlin, chorister. 

The girls who were taken into Phi Nu in 1913-14 gave 
a picture to the society. They have also added to the 
society's pledge for endowment. 

Erma Elliott, Abbie Peavoy and Elizabeth Williams, 
our Phi Nu Seniors, entertained the society at a garden 
party at Erma's home on May 25. The last event of the 
year was the Phi Nu picnic at Nichols Park Friday, May 
29. Of course we all had a glorious time and returned 
home tired but happy. 

BELLES LETTRES REPORT. 

Belles Lettres held her annual open meeting in Music 

Page Twenty-six 




^f)t CoUege (Greetings; 



Hall Saturday evening, May 2. The following program, 
based on the study of the American drama, was given: 
Paper — The Dawn of the American Drama. .Alma Weber 
Quartette (a) Pastoral 

Quartette (b) The Awakening, Op. 19, No. 1 
Freda Fenton Nina Slaten 

Ima Berryman Helen Jones 

Reading — The Man From Home Esse Summers 

Piano Solo — Sherzo B flat minor Chopin 

Eloise Jacobs 

Original Farce — "Council Fires" Audry Berryman 

Belles Lettres Song 

Belles Lettres is glad to announce the following new 
officers for the coming year: President, Alma Weber; 
recording secretary, Johanna Onken; corresponding sec- 
retary, Helen Dinsmore; treasurer, Margaret Coultas; 
librarian, Delia Hurst; sergeant-at-arms, Ima Berryman; 
pages, Irene Irwin, Genevieve Dague. 

The last meeting of the year, on May 26, was the one 
given by the Seniors. A piano solo was given by Lucile 
Olinger, a vocal duet by Nina Slaten and Helen Jones, and 
a violin solo by Helen Harrison. An especially interesting 
number was the original farce by Hallie Clem. The last 
number on the program was the demonstration given by 
the two Home Economics Seniors, Mary Watson and Edith 
Heit, when they served strawberry lemonade, cake and 
mints. At the close of the meeting, our president, Helen 
Harrison, made her farewell speech, presenting the Senior 
token, a comfortable leather arm chair, to the society. 

The annual luncheon in honor of the Seniors in Belles 
Lettres was given at the Colonial Inn Saturday, May 30. 
Miss Alma Weber, president for the coming year, acted as 
toastmistress, and each Senior gave an impromptu toast. 
There were several out of town guests. 

We are always glad to have our old members back 
with us, and this is especially true on Alumnae Day. A 
reception to old Belles Lettres members was given in the 

Page Twenty- seven 



Ci)e CoUes^ ^reettngfi! 



afternoon of Alumnae Day, June 1, in Belles Lettres Hall. 
Many alumnae called during the afternoon. Apricot ice 
and wafers were served. 

THETA SIGMA. 

At the last regular meeting of the Theta Sigma society 
the following new officers were installed: President, Irene 
Merrill; vice-president, Mary Baldridge; recording secre- 
tary, Edna Robb; treasurer, Ethel Glaspie; corresponding 
secretary, Grace Miles; chaplain, Etha Thompson; libra- 
rian, Louise Harries; chorister, Alice Herren; summoner, 
May Bigger; pages, Annie Floreth, Ruth Miller. 

^«? 

LAMBDA ALPHA MU. 

The last meeting of Lambda Mu was full of enthusiasm 
and bright forecast for next year, although a bit saddened 
by the thought that it was the last time just this group 
would respond to the secretary's roll call. We were very 
glad to have as our guest at this time Miss Ruth Davis of 
Atchison, Kansas. 

On Friday night the salad and sandwiches of our out- 
door lunch tasted very good to every member who was 
present at the society picnic at Nichols Park on the twen- 
ty-ninth. All credit to the "eats" committee. 

Lambda Mu is a second time indebted to Rose Ranson 
for a happy afternoon spent at the Ranson home on Mound 
avenue. The good time we had there a year ago was 
fully duplicated on Saturday, May 30. 

The following officers are installed for next year: 
President, M. L. Witbeck; vice-president, Naomi Davis; 
recording secretary, Wylma Cox; corresponding secretary, 
M. L. Powell; treasurer, Hazel Kinnear; critic. Rose Ran- 
son; chaplain, Ola Wendel; pianist, Lucille Reinbach; 
reporter, Ruth Want; sergeant-at-arms, Georgia Hum- 
berd; ushers, Grace Heller, Helen DeWitt 

Page Twenty-eight 




^i)t College ^reetingsi 



^^ 



ACADEMEA. 

The Academea open meeting was held in the old 
chapel Wednesday, May 13, for the Academy students. 
In the business meeting which followed the officers for 
the coming year were elected as follows: President, Mil- 
dred Barton; vice-president, Eloise Strubinger; recording 
secretary, Mary Fowler; treasurer, Marian Jane Robison; 
corresponding secretary, Julia Stuckey; chaplain, Mayme 
Kennedy; pianist, Pauline Jones; prosecuting attorney, 
Ruby Baxter. 

REPORT FROM COLLEGE OF MUSIC. 

The class in Public School Methods visited the depart- 
ments in this method at Springfield, Illinois, April 24. 

The Madrigal Club gave their annual concert April 20 
in the Music Hall. 

Sunday afternoon. May 3, Director and Mr. Swarth- 
out gave a recital at the School for the Blind. 

Mr. Max Swarthout gave a talk on the development 
of the violin, before the History of Music class May 5. 

Mary Violett, soprano, a pupil of Mrs. Hartmann, and 
Mrs. Hartmann were soloists at the presentation of Gaul's 
"Holy City" at Winchester, 111., May 7. 

Miss Beebe, teacher of voice in the College of Music, 
gave a recital before the faculty and a few invited guests 
May 20. Her program consisted of songs from works 
of contemporary American composers. 

A public ensemble program consisting of two eight- 
hand numbers for two pianos, a four-hand number for two 
pianos and a sonata for violin and piano was given in the 
Music Hall May 21. 

The regular students' term recital was given in Music 
Hall May 26. 

The Seniors in the College of Music gave their recital 
on Monday night, June 1. 

Page Twenty-nine 




(E^fje CoUcge (greetingg 



Y. W. C. A. 

The girls who went to Lake Geneva last year and those 
who are planning to go next fall, were entertained by a 
campus party given by Miss Johnston and Miss Anderson, 
who are I. W. C.'s faculty representatives of last year and 
this. The happy reminiscences of last year's delegation 
made the girls of this year very anxious to see what the 
conference is really like, while the helpful hints about 
what to do and what not to do when there, which were 
served with the ice, were eagerly read. 

The May Breakfast, given on May Day morning, was 
altogether a success. It was a good day and the early 
gathering of leaves for garlands had made all appetites 
very keen. As a result of the financial success, the Lake 
Geneva fund is much increased and the treasurer's heart 
much lighter. The selling of ice cold lemonade on Field 
Day had a similar if smaller effect. 

Our organization was fortunate in having Dr. Baker 
for our Y. W. anniversary at Grace Church May 31. He 
gave us a splendid and inspiring sermon. 

ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE. 
1913 Endowment and Improvement Fund. 

Since the last report which was made March 14, 1914, 
there has been paid in a total of $4,371.27 by one hundred 
twenty-four subscribers. Fifty-four of these have gen- 
erously paid the entire subscription, which is greatly ap- 
preciated. Seventy have made partial payments. Of 
the twelve hundred twenty-six subscribers to the fund, four 
hundred sixty-one have now paid in full; five hundred 
thirty-five have paid in part, and two hundred thirty have 
not yet made any payments on their pledges. It is hoped 
that these will make their payments soon, and that many 
of them will find it possible to give the entire amount in 
one payment. The second payment on pledges will be 
due June 4, 1914, and notices will be sent to all subscrib- 
ers as soon as possible after commencement exercises. 

Page Thirty 




Cfje CoEegc (greetings! 



The following" is a summary: 

Total amount pledged $182,242.95 

Balance due March 14, 1914 76,200.07 

Amount paid by 124 friends from March 14, 

1914, to May l5, 1914 4,371.27 

Balance due May 15, 1914 71,828.80 

Total amount now paid 1 10,414.15 

In the Spring the fancies turn not only to thoughts of 
love but also to thoughts of elections for the coming 
school year. The Athletic Association is with the rest of 
the organizations in the election of officers. At a mass 
meeting the nominations of the nominating committee 
were accepted as follows: Esther Fowler, president; 
Edna Robb, vice-president; Alice Tombaugh, secretary. 

^^ 

"I have since wondered if beautiful old Jacksonville 
never grows weary bidding Godspeed to the young lives 
who as students have tarried awhile in her gates. If they 
carry nothing away but the knowledge of how to take a 
victory with modesty and how to come back after a defeat, 
the work has not been in vain. The long streets, the 
graceful elms, the kindly appreciative folk who dwell be- 
neath them, their memory goes with us always." — Extract 
from story "Chums," written by Hettie Anderson Wilson, 
class of 1902. 




Page Thirty-one 



aHiiiimiHmiitiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiMiiiUiiiiiiiHiiHiiiiiiiiiiiitiitiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiimiiiiiiiiniiHmiiiiitniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiMiniiiiiniMiiniiiiiiiHiniiiiiiii 

I THE) TWE)NTY DEPARTMENTS in our store an 

I just like twenty little stores, every one devoted tc 

I the sale and display of articles FOR THE MoDRR^ 

I Woman's weak. 

i Each Department makes a determined and successful 

I effort to show first the attractive new styeES 

I OF THE SEASON. You'll find shopping- pleasanj 

I here. 



Kid Gloves 
Neckwear 
Fabric Gloves 
Linen 

White Goods 
Notions 
Laces and 

Embroideries 



Corsets 

Art Goods 

Petticoats 

Handkerchiefs 

Ribbons 

Toilet Goods 

Jewelry and 



Knit Underwear 
Hosiery 

Children's Wear 
Muslin Underweai 
and Waist! 
Coats and Suits < 
Dresses 1 



Leather 






LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 

FOOTWEAR FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE 

Footwear for all occasions — 
Street Shoes 

Dress Slippers 

Bed-room Slippers 

h: o IP IP El K. s' 

We Repair Shoes 




I J. A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYB 



I THE COLLEGE STORE 

I Pennants, Stationery, Tennis Goods, Drug-s, School 

I Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory 

I Books and Photo Albums 

I "pleased customers" — our motto 

I Goods Delivered 

I Phones: lIlinoiB 57*, Bell 457 Corner South Main St. and Squa' 

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Otto Speith 

pboto portraiture 



Our Portraits were accepted and hung at the National Convention 
in Kansas City 1913 



Formerly Watson Studio 



Southwest Corner Square | 



4 






Soto 
MULLENIX & HAMILTON 

For Everything Sweet 

Hot and Cold Sodas 

216 East state Street 



Coover&Shrevel 

Have a complete line of | 

Drugs, Kodaks, Perfumes, | 
Stationery and Holiday Gifts! 

We do Developing^ & Printing-| 

East and West Side Square | 



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I The most dainty things in Ring's and Jewelry. 

i New and handsome styles of ^oods in Sterling" Silver 

I Highest grades of Cut Glass, and every 

I description of Spectacles and Eye Glasses 

I Fine Diamonds a Specialty 

i at 

X 

I RUSSELL & LYON'S 

I The Oldest Kstablished Jewelry House in Central Illinois 

I West Side Square 

I Both Phones 96 







All the Faculty, Students and Friendi 


1 


Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say 


of the College should have a. Checking 
or Savings Account with 


1 


We can furnish your 
Shoes and Party Slippers 


F. G. FARRELL & CO. 


i 


in the popular styles, 


BANKERS 


i 


leathers, and 


F. E. Farrell, President 


i 


fabrics 


F. E. Crabtree, Vice-President 
H. H. Potter, Cashier 


= 




M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier 



(§rapt)ic 
Concern 



KNGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



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For those who discriminate | 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to | 

please the students who come to our city. We select only the | 

best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. | 

Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and | 

Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. | 

Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all | 

College functions. | 

Vickery 3c Merrigan | 

CATEREF=«© I 

227 West State Street | 



Both Phones 309 



SAFEST PLACE TO TRADE 

fjlLLERBY'^ 

DRY GOODS STORE 



West Side Square 



Brady Bros. | 

E^verything' in Hardware and; 
Paints 1 



Established 1890 



The Jacksonville National Bank 

invites your business 

Capital . . . $200,000 
Surplus . . 34, GOO 

Deposits . . . 1,100,000 

U. S. Depository for Postal Saving Bank 

Julius E. Strawn, President 
Chas. B. Graff, Cashier 
Vice-Presidents: T. B. Orear 

H. J. Rogers, A. A. Curry 

J. R. Robertson 

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Jagksonvill£, /lis 

Low Prices Square Dealing- 
Keep us busy 



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I Coats, Suits and Skirts tailored to your individual 

3 

I measure and form at 

I POPULAR PRICES 

i All work made in our own shop by expert workmen. We 
I guarantee to fit you. 

s 

X 

S 

I JACKSONVILLE TAILORING COMPANY 



233 East State Street 



Opposite Pacific Hotel 



Seraphina — "I didn't get my bed made until noon to- 
day." 

X. — "Was that why you had an engaged sign up? " 
Seraphina — "Why, how did you guess it?" 



iHARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

I Designs, Cut Flowers, 
I Plants 

I Southwest Corner Square 

I Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

I Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

I Greenhouses, Bell 775 

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McGINNIS' 

The Yowngf Ladies' Shoe Store 

See the "BABY DOLL SHOE". 
It's the Latest. 

We carry a full line of Evening Slipper! 
in all colors. 

If it's new, we have it 

JAS. McGINNIS & CO. 

Eaat Side Square 
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Want 

Cut flowers 



F 
E 

R 

N 



FROM 



JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

Both Phones 



Classy styles 
iWe will be pleased to show you our line 

FROST & NOLLEY 

Fashionable Footwear 

For All Occasions 
33 South Side Sq. Jacksonville, 111. 



Job Printing 

Of All Kinds 

John K* Long 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 



213 West Morgan Stree^ 
Illinois Phone 400 i 



H. D. (discussing the Mexican situation) — Have the 
meditators done anything further? 



Dorwart Market 

AlrL, KINDS OF 

FRESH and SALT ME^ATS 
FISH, POULTRY, Etc. 

Both phones 196 330 W. State St. 

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KODAK FINISHING I 

Vulcan Roll Films | 

Cameras from $2.00 up I 

Everything- strictly first class | 

Vail & Vail | 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 B. Side Sq. § 

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PHOTOGRAPHER 



I Successor to McCuUoug^h Bros. 



East Side Square 



I Cameras^ Films^ Papers, 

I Photo Supplies for Kodakers 
IDeveloping:, Printing: and Mounting 

I at reasonable prices 

s 

E 
S 

i Armstrongs Drug Store 

E 

I South West Corner Square 



S. S. Kresge Co. 

5c & IOC Store 

New and Up-to-Date 



iPIPE YOUR HOUSE FOR 

I Jacksonville Railway 
I and Light Co^ 

I 234 S. Main Street 



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H. J. & h. M. SMITH 

Art Needle Work 
and Millinery 

311 West state Street 



HHiinMiiiiHMiniiiiiiiinnMiiniiiiiuniiiiiMiMiMiiiiinnnifiMMiiiiiniiMiiMMiiiiiiniiiiiiiliMiiMnMiii(iuiiiiiiiiiMiMiMiiiiiiiiii(iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiij: 

IN"rEC3FR|-rV I 

Wc have built up our GROCERY and DRUG Departments en a soIid| 
Foundatiox^ of INTEGRITY. In our GROCERY and DRUGS WE| 
SAY WHAT WE BELIEVE, and our customers BELIEVE WH^^tI 
WE SAY. Every item in our store is an example of PURE FOOD,| 
CLEAN FOOD, GOOD FOOD and BEST DRUGS. I 

OURS is a GROCERY AND DRUG STORE with a CONSCIENCEI 

Phone. 800 I^OIBIEP^TS BKyOS. Phone. 800 1 

Grocery—Pharmacy I 

29 South Side Sq. | 



We Sell 

Phoenix Guaranteed 

Silk Hosiery 



DRY GOODS STORE 



Illinois Phone 419 Bell Phone 417 i 

A. L. Bromley | 

Ladies' Tailor | 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and | 

Repairing. Ladies* Man Tail- | 

ored Suits to order. Remodeling i 

of all kinds. Special rates to I 

I. W. C. students. All work | 

called for and delivered promptly | 



M. B. — "1 am so full of chemistry and May Practice 
that I know that when I get up to read my essay I will say 
The test for carbohydrates in mediaeval Oxford was left, 
right, left, right.' " 



111. Phone 57 



Bell Phone 92 



Fresh Drugs, 
Fancy Goods 
Stationery 



H 



Badger Drug Store 

a doors West of Postoffice 

235 E. State Street 
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Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



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I It will pay you to visit 

I SCHRAM'S 

I 

I Jewelry Store 

s 

i college: pins, rings, spoons, etc. 



Len G. Magill 
Printer 

I Bast State Street 111. Phone 418 



T AYLOR'5 

Grocery 

A g"ood place to trade 
221 West State Street 



E. H. — "Where is that girl? Isn't she ready to go? 
A. W. — "No, she's still upstairs fixing up like a fruit 
salad." 



Montgomery & Deppe 

I in their new place on the WEST SIDE OF 
I THE SQUARE ARE SHOWING 

I EVERYTHING IN 

I Dry Goods and Ready-to-Wear Garments 

I Telephone for the Fall Catalogfue 

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IIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIirnilllllllllllllllMllltllllllMllirillinillllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIMIII Illlllllllllllllllllll IIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItllll^ 

College Jewelrv i 

Engraved Cards and Invitations I 

Chafing Dist^es, Copper and Brass Goods | 

Special Die Stationer/ j 

21 South Side Square | 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

Oue block east of College 

HERE TO PLEASE 

Candies Cakes 

Cookies Pies 

Sandwiches Pop on Ice 

Groceries California Fruits 
School Suppiies 




YER 

Brother^ 



Jacksonville's foremost Men's Store 1 

Mackinaw and Sweater Coats[ 

Mannish Cut and Form Fitting | 

Hand Bags, Suit Cases and I 
Trunks i 

I. W. C. Banners and Pillows[ 
SPECIAL DESIGNS ON REQUEST | 



K. L. — 'The dressmaker charged me two dollars for 
making my May Day dress. It cost three dollars alto- 
gether. I could have gone to three hundred picture shows 
with that three dollars." 



ladies' Late Style Sweater 
Coats 



Are Sold by 



^rank Byrns 



Hat 
Store 



C. S. MARTINI 

Wall Paper, Painting | 

and Interior Decorating | 

Pictures and Frames | 

314 W. State St., Scott Block | 

Jacksonville, 111. i 



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Cafe 



Confectionary 



Ipcacock Inn 



Catering- 



Soda 



Candies 



I SKIRT BOXES 

I ROCKERS, SCREENS, 
I DESKS AND 

I BED ROOM CURTAINS 

I AT 

iJohnson, Hackett & Guthrie 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



iCoIIege Girls 

Who Admire 

I Btylish made Clothes should 
I visit the new 

I Royal Ladies^ Tailors 

I Opposite Post Oflfice on East State St. 

|You will find here such made clothes as 
iare only seen in metropolitian centers. 



SHOES 



SLIPPEI 



The only Popular Price Sho'e St( 

in the city 

The only Shoe Store catering 

special orders 

The newest shoes for the least 

money 

JOHNSON BROS. 

Under Farrell's Bank W. State & : 



I SHEET MUSIC, MUSIC MERCHANDISE 

I TALKINC^ MACHINES, RECORDS 

I AND SUPPLIES 

[ 19 SOUTH SIDB PUBLIC SQUARB 
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inHiiMirMiiiiiiiiiiiiiininriiiniMmiiiniirnnnMiMMiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiHiiimiiiliiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiHiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiHiHiiiiiilltimiiiliiimillimiimiililin 

J. BART JOHNSON ^ | 

Everything Musical I 

PIANOS, PLAYER PIANOS, VICTROLAS, | 

IMPORTER OF VIOLINS, AND A COMPLETE | 

LINE OF MUSICAL MERCHANDISE \ 



49 South Side Square 



Dr. Albyn Lincoln Adams 

Oculist and Aurist 
to the State School for the Blind 

323 West State Street 



Practice limited to diseases of the 
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



DR. ALPHA B. APPLEBEEj 
De^ntist I 

3 

326 West State St. [ 



H. M, (in German) — Thie horse answered the caresses 
by gentle snoring. 



DR. BYRON S. GAILEY 

EYE, EAR, 
NOSE AND THROAT 



Office and Residence 
340 West State Street 



Jacksonville's Best and most | 

Popular I 

HO IE L I 

The Home of the Traveling Man I 

Jno. B. Snell, Prop. I 

Rates $2.25, $2.50, and $3.00 per day | 

One Block West of Woman's College 1 

Opposite Post Office | 

Rooms with or without bath | 

Local and Long Distance Telephone | 

in every room. | 

iiimiiiiiiiiiin iiiiiiniii iiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim iimi miiii iiiHtiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiii imiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiitiimiiiiiimiiiiiii 11 iiniiih. 



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Andre & i\ndre 

Everything" in 

High GradeHouse Furnishin 

for E^verybody, Kverywhere 
46-50 North Side Square 



I CAFE BATZ 

I And Annex for LBdies 

I 221-223 East State Street 

illlinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 

230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111 
Illinois Phone 388 



Seraphina — "Can you tell those Webber twins apart? 
I can't tell Alma from Barbara, but if I ever saw them both 
at once I think it would help." 



I Florence Kirk King 
I Hair Dresser 

I special Service in Shampooing 
I Scalp Treatment, Manufacturing 
I Hair into I^atest Styles 
I Work done by appointment 
I 111. Phone 837 503 W. College St. 

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Cheriy's Livery 

Finest Light and Hea\ 
Livery 
Lowest Rates 

235-237, 302-304-306 North Main Stii 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIHIIIIIIHMHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiMiMiiiiimiiiiiiMiiiriiiMiiiiMimiimiimmmmiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMuiMiiiiiiiiiMiiiiMiiii 



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Girls, Patronize our Advertisers | 



Ayers National Bank 

Founded 1852 



Capital 
)^200,000 

Surplus 
^^0,000 




Deposits 
^1,2^0,000 

United States 
Depository 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 

Special Window for Ladies 
Ladies' Waiting- Room 
We make a feature of Ladies' Accounts, and have 
provided facilities for their exclusive use 



OFFICERS 

ll. F. Dunlap, President Q. F. Buffe, Cashier 

Lndrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 

i.. M. Hockenhnll, Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst. Cashier 

C. G. Rutledge, Vice President 



>wen P. Thompson 
$dward F. Goltra 
ohn W. Iveach 



DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhnll 
M. F. Dunlap 



Harry M. Capps 
O. F. Buffe 
Andrew Russel 



iiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHimimiiiii MiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiMiiMiiiiiuiiiiiHiumimiiiMiiHiii 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEG 

I College of Liberal Arts 

I (Full classical and scientific courses) 

I College oi Music 

I School of Fine Arts 

I School of Expression 

I School of Home Economics 

I ^A Standard College — one of the best. 

I Regular college and academy courses 

I leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 

I inently a Christian college with every 

I facility for thorough work. Located 

I in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 

I dignified, old college town, noted for 

I its literary and music atmosphere. 
i Let us have names of your friends 

I who are looking for a good college. 
I Call or address, Registrar' 

i Illinois Woman's College, 

I Jacksonville, 111. 




^HHUIHIHnHIHHUmiHIIIIinilHIIIIIIMHHUIIIUIMmillHUIUMIUIIIHIinHlllllllllMIIIHimilHNIMNMIUIUIIHMUUIUIIIIinllllHMIIMItHINIUIIinimi^^ 



®ije College i§reeting£( 

€jf The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 

<I| Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 

of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the fifteenth of each month. 

HI Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
€jf Entered at Jacksonville PostoflSce as second class matter. 

Contents 

The I^and of Pretty Soon 2 

Editorial ... 3 

A Chafing Dish Story 4 

The First Morning 6 

The Popping of the Pf p-bottle 7 

The Students' Association 8 

The Christian Association 10 

The Athletic Association 11 

Essay Contest 13 

Class Spirit . . 13 

College Spirit 14 

Amendments to the Constitution 15 

L:ike Geneva 16 

The Tuscola Picnic 17 

The Town Girl's Room 18 

Art Notes 19 

Expression Notes 19 

Belle Eettres 20 

Lambda Alpha Mu 20 

Phi Nu .... 20 

Theta Sigma 20 

Y. W. C. A. Notes 21 

Alumnae Notes 21 

The Sophomore Contest 25 

Thk 

Graphic Arts 

Concern 



PRETTY SOON 

I know a land where streets are paved 

With things we meant to achieve; 

It is walled with the money we meant to have saved, 

And the pleasures £or which we grieve. 

The kind word spoken, the promise broken. 
And many a coveted boon 
Are stowed away in that land somewhere, 
The land of Pretty Soon. 

There are ancient jewels of possible fame 
Lying about in the dust. 
And many a lofty aim 
Covered with mold and rust. 

And oh, the place, while it seems so near, 
Is farther away than the moon. 
Though our purpose is fair, we ne'er get there. 
To the land of Pretty Soon. 

It is farther at noon than it is at dawn. 
Farther at night than at noon. 
Oh, let us beware of that land down there 
The land of Pretty Soon, 



Ibe College (Greetings 



)1. XVIII Jacksonville, 111., October, 1914 No. I 

i.cULTY Advisor — Miss Mary Anderson. 

DiTOR in-Chief — Helena Muijson 

5SOcr.\TE AND Alumnae Editor — Winifred Burnieister. 

3SISTANT Editors— Helen Mci'.bee, Elaine Buhrmau. 

JSINESS Manager — Audrey' Berrynian. 

JSiSTANT Business Managers— Ahna Harrael, Mary Harriijon. 



Did you notice on the "Take One, It's Your Colleg-e 
aper, " that the "your" was underlined? The Greet- 
g this year is to be your college paper in the fullest 
;nse, for it will be what you make it. Contributions are 
)licited from the students as the heading on the first page 
,ys, but above all voluntary contributions are asked for. 
is impossible for the few on the staff to know of the 
Dssible hidden talent among the student body. The 
litor cannot depend on the English department for its 
lort-stories because then the paper becomes an organ of 
lat department, which must be avoided in order to make 
le paper truly yours. 

Article I., section 2, of the constitution reads: "The 
jrpose of this publication shall be to record college 
^ents, to assist the alumnae in keeping in touch with the 
)llege, to publish the best literary effort of the student 
Ddy, to serve as an effective organ for college activities, 
> express the atmosphere and spirit of the college, and to 
;rve the best interests of the college in all ways." Em- 
tiasis is put upon two phrases of the purpose in the policy 
F the greetings for this year. 

Page Three 



1E%t CoUfge ^reettns^ 



An alumnae editor has been appointed by an amend- 
ment to the constitution, and an effort is going to be made 
to make this department worth while and in truth keep 
the alumnae in touch with the college. 

Heretofore, the Greetings has been a paper to be prouc 
of in the way in which it expressed the spirit of the school 
Our purpose for this coming year is one measure broader 
for should we not reach out for something better in build- 
ing on past experience? We have tried to make a begin- 
ning in the first issue. This number has been plannec 
with the idea in view to help each girl find her place ir 
college activites so that she wll catch "It" at the beginning 
of the year rather than at the end. Not only to express 
but to help create college spirit, is the foremost thought ol 
the new staff. 

This throws wide open the door of opportunity foi 
boosting to every organization or activity of the school 
Don't wait to be asked for material on a past occurrence 
give us voluntary contribution on coming events and bj 
so doing help the Greetings, your project, and the college 

Whatever your literary ability may be, story telling 
essay writing, rhymes, or well told jokes, develop it b] 
writing for the Greetings. Such material must be writtei 
on regular copy paper which may be secured at the office 
Write across the length of the sheet in a clear distinct hand 
spacing words and lines well, and drop it into the Greet 
ing's box, which always smiles its thanks to you ever 
though you may not be able to understand its expression 
Let me whisper a secret to you: Giving of your bes 
freely, puts you in line for an office on coming staffs. 

A CHAFING DISH STORY. 

Mabel came swiftly down the hall in answer to he: 
dearest friends beckoning finger. 

"Well Rachel, what exciting and really new secre 
have you to tell me now? " 

age Ponr. 



tEPfie College ^reettngai 




"Oh, nothing of the kind, this time; but I do wish 
you would hold this chair on my bed while I put up this 
lovely picture that I bought at the ten cent store. That 
perfectly new roommate of mine has gone for the fifth or 
sixth time to interview the dean, and left me, here on the 
sinking sands of these bed springs, to hang up the decora- 
tions." 

Mabel obediently held the chair in place while her 
tongue flew at a rapid gait. 

"I see you brought a chafing dish back with you this 
time, Rachel." 

"Well, it's really not mine. It's Mary's, my room- 
mate's, you know. Why?' 

"Oh, I was just thinking. I have a stand in my room 
that would hold that chafing dish easily and if you could 
persuade Mary to bring it, we could have a party and some 
fudge in my room tonight. 

Rachel enthusiastically accepted the invitation. 
"Don't you worry. I'll be there with the chafing dish, and 
bring Mary along too. She is the only one who under- 
stands how to run the article. It's different from most 
chafing dishes. Mary said she brought it against the 
wishes of her whole household." 

At eight o'clock that evening, Rachel, bearing the chaf- 
ing dish, joined the crowd of girls in Mabel's room. 

"Mary couldn't come," she explained. "She had a 
date, but I can manage the lamp now, I think. It's all 
ready for action as soon as the stuff for fudge is put in." 

Rachel had just started the lamp when the arrival of 
another girl drew all attention to the opposite side of the 
room, but instead of the merry greeting the crowd had ex- 
pected, they were met by a cry of horror. "Girls! The 
chafing dish! Put it out quick!" 

The whole room seemed ablaze. Rivulets of fire ran 
along the floor, upon the table, up and down the curtains. 
Mabel frantically seized the water pitcher but it was 
empty. The others stood motionless dazed by the danger. 

Page Five 



Wi^t College ^vtttinqi 



A vision of her school burned to the ground flashed 
through Rachel's mind and then, seizing a large felt 
cushion, she tried to beat out the fire, but the flames stub- 
bornly ate their way across the floor. 

"Oh girls, help me, help me!" pleaded Rachel. 
The girls seemed to recover self possession with one 
accord. Some rushed for the fire extinguisher, others 
grabbed cushions to help smother the fire. In a short 
time only charred curtains and woodwork, and hopelessly 
discolored cushions remained to tell the tale of a fire, but 
it was a subdued bunch of girls that left Mabel's room a 
few minutes later. 

May Blackburn, '16. 

THE FIRST MORNING. 

Mrr-r-r-ing!! 

"O, hum! I hope some one answers that telephone. 
Tm too sleepy to get up," thought Judith as an electric 
bell wakened her. 

Dang, dang, dang, dang! 

"Oh, what is the matter? All sorts of bells seem to 
persist in waking me up this morning. It must be late, 
though, for that was the vegetable man and he never 
comes till at least nine-thirty." 

Judith drowsily opened her eyes, but with a start 
glanced about the room. 

"Mary, Mary," she cried, hopping out of bed and run- 
ning over to her roommate. "Mary, get up. Don't you 
know this is the first morning of college? That must 
have been that weird sounding bell that somebody told me 
would come clanging down the corridors at a very early 
hour. Oh, my, it is six-thirty and we have only half an 
hour to get dressed for breakfast. Why, I never have 
dressed in half an hour. Where are my shoes? I can't 
find a thing. Now I have my shoes buttoned up wrong." 

"Well, if you would talk less and quit jumping around 

Page Six 



tS^t CoOtge ^reettng^ 




the middle of the floor, perhaps you might be able to get 
dressed," said her calm sophomore roommate. 

"Now, just look, there isn't a drop of water in this 
pitcher. I suppose I'll have to go get some. I was scared 
to go after it last night for fear I would be doing something 
wrong. Oh goodness, it is ten minutes till seven and my 
hair isn't even combed. You are all dressed, aren't you? 
Please get into my trunk and get out that blue dress. No, 
not that one, the other one. There goes that five minute 
bell — we have to start down now, don't we? Well, I 
suppose I am ready. Oh, my goodness, no, I haven't a 
belt on. I wonder where it is. I know I am going to be 
the last one in the dining room. I don't see why you can't 
help me instead of standing there laughing." 

But Mary could not resist. It was too funny. Had 
she acted that way her first morning at college? 

Genevieve Dague, '17. 

THE POPPING OF THE PEP-BOTTLE. 

For years some sort of a fluid had been corked up, put 
in cases and stowed away within the walls of I. W. C. 
This was known only to those living inside. Outsiders 
were practically unaware of "Its" existence. We heard 
much about this fluid and "Its" power for good, so much, 
in fact, that we became blinded to "Its" faults. It is true 
that "It" hovered in our atmosphere binding us together 
as college students and strengthening our ties to our Alma 
Alater. But in no less manner is it true that "It" worked 
in opposite directions. "It" tended to make us self-cen- 
tered and self-satisfied. 

One morning large signs greeted the girls on the way 
to the dining room. These cards read, "Have You Got 
'It'?" "Got What?" "Well, Get 'It'" and "You've 
Got 'It', Now Keep 'It'." But still "It" wasn't revealed. 
A few days later when the girls went to chapel they noticed 
that they had visitors. An old man, a pump and a bucket 

Page Seven 




Z^ CoUege ^reettngK 




full of "It" stood on the platform. The girls caught the 
spirit intended and brought out case after case. The bot- 
tles popped and bursted, unable to withstand the pressure 
of the mysterious atmosphere. From these bottles, in all 
radiance and splendor, poured forth that which had been 
stowed away so long, "Ginger Pep," or College Spirit. 

And so now we are reaching out and grasping larger 
ideas and by so doing we are showing our true devotion to 
the Illinois Woman's College. 

Mary Harrison, '17. 

THE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION. 

Are you acquainted with the girl who is always look- 
ing down her nose through the big end of the telescope? 
If she is your bosom friend, watch yourself, for what she 
sees through that end of the instrument is so small and far 
away that it doesn't seem worth while to her. Try to 
induce her to reverse the instrument and enlarge her 
vision. We have a big proposition on our hands this fall. 
It will take us all to handle it. Coming back from vaca- 
"tions spent in various parts of the country, we should have 
our lungs so full of fresh air and our minds so filled with 
good things that we will not seem like the same student 
body that worked together last spring. What did you do 
with your vacation, Freshman; or you. Sophomore, and 
you, upper classmen? No matter where you have been, 
you have been storing up energy and happiness, for you 
couldn't possibly use all that comes to you with vacation. 
Please do not pattern after the too careful woman who 
puts away a pair of gloves to save and saves them so long 
that when she does bring them forth to wear at some 
funeral they fall to pieces in putting them on. Use your 
energy now, don't stack it up in a corner and expect to get 
it out on occasion. It's for no funeral that we want your 
enthusiasm and aid now. 

Page Eight 




^f}t €oUtQe (@reeting£( 



The installation of self-government in the College has 
been a big step forward. We shouldn't think of wearing 
clothes of five years ago if we could possibly afford things 
up to date. It takes away self-respect to be shabby or 
dowdy. E. W. Flynn, the famous Chautauqua health lec- 
turer, believes in everyone wearing the best clothes he can 
afford. His advice to a young man is to keep his suit 
pressed if he has to put it under the mattress and to keep 
his shoes shined if he has to spit on them. 

Student Government isn't a fad, but an advance, a 
development that is a sign of progress. In nearly every 
college of rank the student body has asked for it, and v/ith 
the strides we are making as a growing influential college, 
we are very desirous of seeing it here. 

We as a student body have v/orked together on other 
occasions and for other purposes, so we are assured that 
a few of us will not have to stand on the highways with 
a megaphone and boost for a Student Association. If you 
stop to think that a Student Association means practical, 
actual independence of action and thinking, toward 
strengthening of character for women, does it not seem 
worth while to you to make a sacrifice or two and help 
make history in this College? 

How do you like our first booklet? Are you going to 
regard it as a nuisance of don'ts or a really aid? It is a 
beginning, at least, and is tangible evidence of our success 
so far. Above all, let us be sane and natural, and for one 
thing, remember that proctors are just as full of red blood 
corpuscles and vacation effervescence as we are, and aren't 
guaranteed paper patterns by which we are to mark our 
courses. They are simply good souls who are anxious 
to put their best into all student affairs for Alma Mater, 
You old girls know what is expected of you. The new 
students consciously and unconsciously do as you do. Be 
glad of the chance to prove that you have "It" by being 
square, and do it cheerfully. We have no time or place for 
the person with a crust here. Smile and lend a hand. We 



Page Nine 



tlCiie CoOege ^reettngK 



shall soon have an organization of the whole student body 
of which we as individuals and a college will be proud. 

Peril Hess, '15. 

THE CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

To squeeze into a brief article at the head of the Asso- 
ciation notes, anything more than a suggestion of the 
breadth and the wealth of the opportunity for self expres- 
sion offered by the Student's Christian Association is not 
what is attempted here. You have seen the Association 
girls meeting trains and dispensing information on those 
first bewildering days of school. You have accepted their 
hospitality at the welcoming party, have sung with them 
and felt their friendliness. E're now, no doubt, you have 
some inkling of the deeper significance. of this large affilia- 
tion of students that bears proudly the name of a Christian 
organization. Now that you have yourselves become part 
of the Association, you will want to know how best you 
may actively express the enthusiasm for it which is so 
dominant an element in all of its members. We hope to 
give every girl in College something to do. The policy 
for the Association for 1914-15 is: 

1. To deepen the spiritual life of the entire Associa- 
tion. 

2. To keep the membership closely in touch with the 
world's student movement; to avoid provincialism. 

3. To co-poerate with the churches of Jacksonville 
through student Bible classes. 

4. To extend Social Service work. 

5. To increase systematic and intelligent giving. 

6. To make the devotional meetings express the life 
and activity of the Association; to increase their interest, 
sincerity, helpfulness. 

Any plan or suggestion which presents itself or that 
you can make to the cabinet which will further that policy, 
we will be eager to adopt. 

Page Ten 




Wi)t CoOese ^vntinQi 




When you have heard more of the magnitude of this 
world's student federation, you will glory in the bigness of 
it. There is something invigorating and inspiring to know 
that while you are working here at the Woman's College 
under a common purpose and toward a common end, that 
there are young women in forty different nations who are 
taking the same pledge, exalting the same purpose, and 
following the same Christ as you. It is impossible to be 
provincial and narrow and at the same time be an intelli- 
gent member of the Y. W. C. A. And to be an intelligent 
member, read the Association Monthly, attend the weekly 
meetings, be an enthusiastic member of a mission study 
class, and serve eagerly and efficiently on whatever com- 
mittee you may be appointed for. Girls, in your busy- 
ness with your other College activities, do not forget that 
you owe it to that ideal for yourself which you are striv- 
ing to fulfill to make your relation to this most vital of 
college organizations not simply that of a passive member, 
but of an active enthusiast who knows the charm and the 
urgency of her cause, 

Ruth Want, '16. 

THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

The Athletic Association is one of the 
three organizations that is open to every 
member of both the College and Acad- 
emy. It is not only open to member- 
ship, but it is desirous that every girl 
here cast in her lot for it for big things. 

Dr. Marker and the Faculty have 
made dear old I. W. C. standard in lit- 
erary and special lines. Are we girls 
going to make it standard in athletics? 
Are we going into athletics whole- 
heartedly for ourselves, for our classes, 
for our College? 

Page Eleven 




lE'^t CoOese ^xtttinzi 




Heretofore there has been plenty of individual interest 
shown in our Association, so much that almost every girl 
here became a member. But it was unorganized interest 
with no big incentive to draw it out. Each girl enlisted 
in some game, perhaps because she liked it but more likely 
because she had to. 

The biggest thing in athletics , the thing that draws 
the whole College into it, is class competition. Why is 
the Essay Contest the jolliest , best time of all the year? 
Because two classes put up their best and support that best 
with all the enthusiastic loyalty they possess. Multiply 
that two by five and watch athletics boom ! 

Why not form class basket-ball teams, base-ball teams, 
hockey, and captain-ball teams; play for class champion- 
ship; then defend the championship from all other chal- 
lenges. In all probability each class will be large enough 
to have a team contesting in every department of athletics. 

For those interested in the less violent sports, archery 
teams could be organized. Tennis is ever present, with 
a silver loving-cup as a trophy for the most skillful. 

Besides the games for fall and spring, basket-ball and 
captain-ball last all winter. With classes battling for the 
championship in these games, the whole College behind 
them to push and cheer, we would have the gayest winter 
old I. W. C. has ever known. 

These sports are not the only kind of athletics there is, 
or the only kind that we wish to emphasize. Perhaps you 
know picnics, tramps, hare-and-hound chases, etc., belong 
to this organization. 

Do you know that a big half of you girls waste your 
Mondays? True, you clean your rooms and go down 
town. That should hardly account for whole days when 
they are as beautiful as these fall ones are and the spring 
ones will be. Clean on Saturdays and have your Mon- 
days free, joyous days of your own. Get a jolly congen- 
ial bunch together; go for a tramp or a picnic; go to 
Nichols park for breakfast and a morning row. Or, if 

Page Twelve 



(ZCf)t CoOege ^IreetingK 




you wish, bring your class into that also. Take your sis- 
ter class on a picnic. Challenge a non-sister class to a 
hare-and-hound chase and end up with a picnic dinner to- 
gether. You will find it a great deal more fun than spend- 
ing the same amount of money at Peacock Inn, Mondays 
will then mean a big holiday to you. 

Girls, let's work for our classes, and endeavor to make 
them the best in the College in every way. For where 
there is the liveliest class spirit there you will find the big- 
gest and best college spirit. Let's go in shoulder to shoul- 
der to make 1914-15 a really big and wonderful year in 
athletics. 

Esther Fowler, '17. 



THE ESSAY CONTEST. 

The essay contest which usually has come toward the 
end of the year, it is hoped will be given before Christmas 
vacation this year. This is one of the things that we are 
■A\ interested in and a time when the most class spirit is 
shown. If the girls who are thinking of entering would 
begin to think seriously about it now, they would not be 
so rushed when the semester is half over. We are look- 
ing for some of the best essays this year we have ever had 
and we hope many will enter it so it will be bubbling over 
with enthusiasm, pep, and class spirit. 

CLASS SPIRIT. 

As the new student faces the realization of all her 
dreams and enters for the first time the college halls, she 
expects to enjoy all the advantages of the College and re- 
ceive its benefits. Of these benefits there is one which 
is a most vital part of college, and which she cannot 
fail to see all around her and without which she will be out 
of touch and sympathy with the girls she meets. It is 
Class Spirit. Just as enthusiasm gives the otherwise dry 

Page Thirteen 




tEt^t College ^reettngse 



and uninieresting subject or occupation a new meaning, 
so class spirit gives new energy and vigor to college life. 

When class spirit really takes hold of the student, lazi- 
ness and indifference have no place in her character; but 
with no thought of self, she is eager to fit into her notch, 
making the machinery move forward without friction. 
No longer is she a round peg in a square hole, but is anxious 
to put all her energies into service. She thus will get that 
broader vision that college life is what she makes it. 

"Every great and commanding movement in the an- 
nals of the world," says Emerson, "is the triumph of some 
enthusiasm." Does not class spirit have just such a rec- 
ord in college activities? 

Indifference never leads armies that conquer, never 
models statues that live, or breathes sublime music, or 
moves the soul with poetry or the world with heroic ser- 
vice. Enthusiasm of the hand, as Charles Bell says, 
wrought the statue of Memnon and hung the brazen gates 
of Thebes. It opened the tubes of the telescope for Gali- 
leo so that he saw worlds and their systems. It caused 
Columbus, undaunted by doubting and ridicule, to make 
the path from the old world to the new. 

Class Spirit is just as indomitable and by increasing 
strong feeling and loyalty trains for the larger, broader 
spirit, our love and devotion to our Alma Mater. 

Marie Miller, '16. 

COLLEGE SPIRIT. 

Some girls are especially interested in one certain or- 
ganization of the school, others in another. Perhaps 
Sally racks her brains and blisters her feet (treasurer, you 
know) for her class, and Molly suffers from aching mus- 
cles so that her team may win that basket-ball game, while 
Betty worries deep wrinkles into her face in deciding what 
the proctor board should do to a rule-breaker; yet, uniting 

Page Fourteen 






^tie CoUrge ^reettng£( 



all the girls in the various branches of student activity is 
College Spirit. 

This wonderful kind of enthusiasm teaches Sally, Molly 
and Betty that class, society, athletics, or the Christian 
Association is not the chief among student organizations 
and activities but that it is only a part of the whole dear 
college which they call their own. Through this binding 
influence each girl learns that her efforts in one direction 
are more deeply concerned in the advancement of the 
school than in the fraction in which she needs must center 
her interest. A few years ago, how lucky we thought our- 
selves if we happened to be in a high school which had 
plenty of spirit. To us the school was the "best ever" 
and not a flaw could we see in it. College spirit is bigger 
and broader than our old high school spirit. The same 
old pride and love are there as strong as ever, but now we 
try to see how we can help to improve the old order es- 
tablished by other students who have gone before. Col- 
lege spirit makes the student realize that the college exists 
for her and, as she gladly takes what it offers, this same 
spirit teaches her to express her gratitude in loyalty and 
work. On the other hand, as each girl finds some work 
that she may do and does it gladly, she catches this wonder- 
ful enthusiasm called college spirit which makes her col- 
lege life mean far more to her. Find your work, girls, 
now in the beginning, catch the spirit and make this your 
college not only in name but in fact. Helen McGhee, '16. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION. 

At the Greetings Breakfast held last May two amend- 
ments to the Constitution were made and which were 
crowded out of the June number. 

AMENDMENT I. 

The Associate Editor shall act as Alumnae Editor and 
keep in personal touch with all the alumnae associations 
of the College. 

Page Fifteen 



Wi)t College (Jlreetingfi; 



AMENDMENT II. 
The Greetings shall have an Auditing Committee 
v/hich shall consist of the Faculty Advisor, the Registrar 
and one College student chosen by the Faculty Advisor 
and the Registrar from the student body; the student 
chosen shall not be a member of the staff. This commit- 
tee shall certify to the correctness of the Business Mana- 
ger's report and affix their signatures to the final report 
given in the May number of the Greetings. 

LAKE GENEVA. 

It was almost as much fun as coming back to school 
when v/e seven, who were fortunate enough to be going 
to Lake Geneva, met in Chicago. Then when we found 
Dr. Marker waiting for us in the Northwestern station, it 
was indeed a glad reunion. 

That was only the beginning of our good times. From 
the time v/e left the train at Williams Bay and took the 
boat across the lake to the Y. W. C. A. camp until the 
time we took our last ride back to take the train home 
we. felt that every minute had been "worth while." 

The Association camp is located on the hillside over- 
looking Lake Geneva, and from the tents nestled up among 
the trees the view out over the lake is beautiful. 

The day began when we met in the dining room for 
breakfast and sang "Holy, Holy, Holy." Our mornings 
were filled with class-work — good, live classes of enthus- 
iastic girls — conducted by fine, strong men and women. 
We had two lectures every day, one in the morning and the 
other in the evening. 

In the afternoons we were free to do as we pleased. 
We soon found that we did not have nearly enough time 
to visit all of the interesting places we wished to see. We 
visited the Yerkes Observatory, took a boat trip around the 
lake seeing many beautiful summer places and spent other 
afternoons swimming, playing tennis, and walking. Who 

Page Sixteen 




Wi)t CoQege (tlreetingfe 




of us will soon forget the time Dr. Marker took us sailing", 
our trip around the lake when it was so rough we could 
not go across and our long climb in search of the high 
tower, or the beautiful moonlight nights when we sat out 
on the pier and sang. 

It is hard to describe the charm of Geneva, but all 
who go there feel it and come away with ideals a little 
higher, full of enthusiasm and inspiration. Our only re- 
gret was that all of the girls could not have been there to 
share it with us. 



THE TUSCOLA PICNIC. 

"Will all that live within fifty miles of Tuscola, 111., 
please sign here? " 

So read a notice on the bulletin board last May, The 
result was a genuine I. W. C. picnic at Patterson Springs, 
five miles from Tuscola, on Wednesday, Aug. 5. The 
home of Letta Irwin, '14, was the headquarters from 
whence proceeded a carriage to the various stations from 
6:30 a. m. to 12:40 p. m., when the last of the girls ar- 
rived. We drove out to the springs in a hack, where we 
were met by an auto-load from Oakland, making a crowd 
of fifteen in all (not including the drivers). The dinner 
was the really-truly picnic kind, v/hich is all that need be 
said about it, and afterwards there was rowing on the river. 

After so good a beginning every one was eager to 
make the picnic an annual affair. Next year we hope to 
plan on a larger scale. We shall not limit ourselves to a 
fifty-mile radius, and anyone who has ever attended I. W. 
C. will be welcome. The date will probably remain the 
same, the first Wednesday in August. We shall try to 
invite everyone who lives reasonably near, but if anyone 
is overlooked we hope she will write to Tuscola and be 
included in the plans. Decide now to save a day for the 
Tuscola picnic next summer. 

Page Seventeen 



tE'\)t CoQese ^reettngsi 



The charter members of the Eastern Illinois, Illinois 
Woman's College Annual Picnic Society, as someone 
named us, were: Miss Mary Anderson, Macon; Gladys 
Henson, Villa Grove; Ola Wendel, Newman; Hope Hal- 
berstadt, Tolono; Ruth Mattocks, Anne and Lyone 
Schafer, Oakland; Edna and Mabel Larson, Paxton; Cecil 
Allen, Broadlands; Rachel Morris, Allerton; Helen Paw- 
son, Sidell; Corinne Hughes, Waverly; Letta and Irene 
Irwin, Tuscola. 

Letta Irwin, '14. 

THE TOWN GIRLS' ROOM. 

During the summer a room on the ground floor of the 
main building, formerly used for storage purposes, was 
transformed into a cheerful, cozy rest-room for the town 
girls. Such a room has long been needed, but owing to 
limited space has been impossible before. 

The town girls are indeed most grateful for this com- 
fortably furnished room, which has broad, sunny windows 
(in which ferns and geraniums will flourish later) looking 
out onto the middle court and campus. Different ones of 
the girls are bringing curtains, pillows, table covers, and 
pictures to complete the attractiveness of their "I. W. C. 
home." The resident girls and faculty will be welcome 
at any time. 

Every town girl is urged to this room. It is in a con- 
venient place as it is near both the cloak lobby and gym- 
nasium. It is to be used as a dressing room as well as a 
rest room. Those who are obliged to bring their lunches 
will doubly appreciate its use. We hope that later this 
place of so many uses will be designated by a more at- 
tractive name than just "town girls' room." 

Helen Dinsmore, '15. 
% 

Miss Ludwig was married to Mr. James V. Martin, 
June 11, 1914. Their home is to be in Tokyo, Japan. 

'Page Eighteen 




tlTfie CoUese ^reetings( 




ART NOTES. 

We are to have an unusual privilege this year in hold- 
ing- an exhibition of oil paintings by contemporary Ameri- 
can painters. 

This event will be one of the numbers of the Artists' 
Course and will be assembled from the winter exhibitions 
in the New York Academy of Design by the American Fed- 
eration of Arts. 

The Art classes are starting in a satisfactory manner — 
several students enrolling for the full Art course. 

EXPRESSION NOTES. 

The new director of the School of Expression is very 
happy to report an enrollment equal to that of other years 
and to note an increase as the first week advanced. Miss 
Gleckler is still happier to find such an enthusiastic and 
interested spirit among the girls in all lines of Expression. 

There has been introduced into the course this year a 
class in original Public Speaking, which the director hopes 
to make one of the strongest courses offered in the depart- 
ment. The class will study debate the first half of the 
year, from a theoretical and practical standpoint, and the 
second half will study oratory from both standpoints. In 
addition, if enough students desire it, will be offered a 
course in Parliamentary Usage, which will study the con- 
duct of all public assemblies, organizing into courts, con- 
ventions, and legislative bodies for actual practice. All 
literary society members should be interested in this class. 

The second half of Expression Two will be a Shake- 
spearean course, which will study the play chosen from 
both a literary and dramatic standpoint with a view to its 
presentation in the spring. 

Miss Gleckler and her assistant, Miss Shaw, will be 
most happy to welcome at any time interested visitors. 

Page Nineteen 



tirtie CoUege ^vettinzi 




BELLES LETTRES. 

The Belles Lettres girls are back with lots of "ginger 
pep," hoping to help make I. W. C. the best College in 
the Middle West. An interesting and instructive course 
of study is being arranged for the year and every member 
is eager to do her part. The Society is glad to welcome 
Ruth Taylor back as a "new old" member. 

LAMBDA ALPHA MU. 

Twenty Lambda members are back in the College halls 
gradually becoming accustomed to the new quarters on 
second floor Main. Two new pictures, "The Song of the 
Lark" and "Sir Galahad" have been given to the hall by 
members of the Society. 

The Society met as a whole for the first time at a pic- 
nic breakfast at Nichols Park September the twenty-first. 

Friends of Naomi Davis will be glad to hear that she 
has been made head of the Department of Expression in 
Cottey College, Nevada, Missouri. 

if 

PHI NU NOTES. 

Phi Nu is well represented this year though we are 
sorry to lose Margaret Meek, our secretary, whose illness 
prevented her return. 

Erma Elliott, one of our last year's Seniors, will study 
for her Master's Degree at the University of Illinois this 
year, while Abbie Peavoy is teaching at Volga, South 
Dakota. Roma Swarthout has been doing concert work 
the past summer and will go on with it this winter. 

yf 

THETA SIGMA. 

The third year for Theta Sigma has started with very 
promising prospects. Although only fourteen of our 
members have returned, each girl is entering into the work 



Page Twenty 



Cfjc CoUcge ^xtttin^a 




vidth so much enthusiasm that we hope we will not feel the 
lack of numbers. Our new society room, on third floor 
main building, is a great source of interest, its appearance 
having been greatly improved by several new pieces of 
furniture. On Monday morning, Sept. 28, the members 
of Theta Sigma enjoyed a picnic breakfast at Nichols Park, 
followed by a jolly time on the water. 

>^ 
Y. W. C. A. NOTES. 

On Saturday evening, Sept. I9th, all the girls gath- 
ered in the social hall for an informal party. What a glad 
handshaking there was and how plentiful the smiles. Tiny 
favors v/ere given the girls on which were written a wel- 
come and the names of the cabinet officers. The finding 
and putting together of favorite songs helped the girls to 
get acquainted, and the singing of the songs was a real 
pleasure. 

Refreshments of punch and wafers were served. The 
bower was just outside the west entrance to Marker Hall 
and was a most delightful retreat. 

The program for Sunday, Sept. 20th, was led by Miss 
Want. The subject Avas "The Christian Association in 
Our College." Miss Want's talk brought out very clearly 
the object and benefit of the Association, and besides ac- 
qainting the new girls with the work, drew the old girls to 
the work with greater loyalty. A few old girls spoke of 
the benefits they had derived from Y. W. C. A. The song 
so delightfully rendered by Miss Demuth was enjoyed by 
everyone. 

ALUMNAE NOTES. 

This year the Greetings has decided to have a special 
department for the Alumnae. Before, it has been any- 
body's business, and as always, what is anybody's business 
is nobody's. We want all the Alumnae to feel that this 

Page Twenty-one 




Cf)e CoQege ^xtttinfii 




year they have a personal friend in the Alumnae Editor, 
one who will be down in the front hall to receive them 
when they return to I. W. C. to visit, or to whom they may 
write letters filled with things of personal interest. The 
Greetings wants to fill a long felt want, that of helping 
the girls who have gone from I. W. C. to keep in touch 
with each other. 

Winifred Burmeister, 

Alumnae Editor. 

Announcements of weddings and rumors of others 
make their way to the Greetings office. 

On June 3rd Sarah Hughes and Ralph Otis Aikman 
were married in the Methodist church in Hume, Illinois, 
Greta Coe, '06, was one of the bridal party. 

Gladys Lee Maine on June 20th became the bride of 
Chester Arthur Shafer. The cards read "At Home," Hib- 
bing, Minnesota. 

Jessie May Campbell and Edward Wilson Davis were 
wedded on June 4th and will reside in Yorktown, Indiana. 

Esther Asplund and Frank Rucker chose July 22nd for 
their wedding day and Independence, Mo., as their home. 

Another June wedding united Tilman Stout, whose 
mother and sister are I. W. C. alumnae, with Daisy Coons, 
a former student at the Woman's College. 

On August 5th Lucile Jackson was wedded to Albert 
E. Curry. After a journey in the East they returned to 
Jacksonville, where they have established a country home. 

Miss Ruth Patterson, of Lawrence, Kansas, graduated 
in the I. W. C. class of 1911. Later she continued her 
studies at Columbia, New York City. On September 9th 
she was married to Fred B. Hopper and returns with him 
to Jacksonville to make her home in the pretty bungalow 
being built in Diamond Court. 

Page Twenty-two 



^f}t CoUfge (j^rectinffg 



September 30th is the date set for the marriage of Etta 
Blackburn, '94, and Mr. Charles G. Steinhart, of Wilming- 
ton, Illinois. 

1908 — In Edwardsville, 111., on September 21, Hor- 
tense Corbett and Mr, Frank B. Saunders were married. 
Their place of residence remains in Edwardsville, Nine St. 
Andrews Place. 

An announcement has been received of the marriage 
of Miss Clara Baker to James Herbert Kelly, Aug. 28, 
1914. They will be at home in Gunnison, California. 
Miss Baker taught English here last year. 

1856 

Miss Frances M. McGinnis, who for many years taught 
in the public schools of Jacksonville and later in the Illinois 
School for the Blind, passed from life to life eternal on 
September 19th in her eighty-first year. Miss McGinnis 
was a devout Christian and a devoted student of the Bible. 

1867. 

Mrs. Mary Shepherd Kuhl, superintendent of the Na- 
tional Evangelistic Department of the W. C. T. U., has 
recently changed her residence from Champaign, Illinois, 
to Columbus, Ohio. 

1908. 

Mrs. Vera Ross Richter has moved from St. Louis to 
Shelby, Ohio. She writes that her fifteen months old son 
absorbs most of her time. 

Mrs. Hazel Ross Southerland leaves Chicago this 
month to make her home in Denver, Colorado. 

1902. 

Mrs. Gertrude Tanner Day writes from her home in 
Alexandria, La., that she is enjoying life on Evasta Planta- 
tion and that she has for near neighbors Mrs. Jessie Bul- 
lard Fremaux, '04, and her small son born in July. 

1904. 

Announcement has been received of the birth of a sec- 
ond son to Mr. Homer Potter and Mrs. Bertha Ogram Pot- 
ter, the name James Edward. 



Page Twenty-three 



^fje CoUegc ^vtttinzi 



1905. 

Alice Farrell Wadsworth, '05, with her sister, Mary 
Wadsworth, and Lillian Davis, former students of 1. W. C, 
spent the summer in European travel. They were in 
Brussels when war was declared and, journeying to Paris, 
were there when France declared war; crossing the chan- 
nel, they were in London when Great Britain announced 
that the strength of that great kingdom would be given 
her allies to protect them from German invasion. After 
witnessing the panic and distress attending these moment- 
ous events and experiencing some anxieties, they secured 
passage and a safe journey home. 

We are all interested in what last year's Seniors are 
doing. 

Hallie Clem, who is teaching Latin and German at 
Virginia, 111., is succeeding very well as can be seen by the 
way she keeps down the unruly boys by taking off thirty 
in their deportment. 

Letta Irwin is teaching German, Algebra and English 
at Hume, 111. 

Mary Watson is staying at home at Sauk Center, Minn., 
taking the home course in Domestic Science this year, 
which she will soon put into use. 

Geneva Upp is using her brain to its utmost capacity 
at La Kota, S. D., teaching Agriculture and other kindred 
subjects. 

Abbie Peavoy, last year's successful editor of the 
Greetings, is trying to instill into the heads of the small 
South Dakotians some of the history of their own pros- 
perous state at Volga. 

Erma Elliott will represent I. W. C. this year at Illinois 
University, where we expect to see her carry off the honors 
in her post graduate work. 

Clara Kelly is teaching Domestic Science at Fredrick 
Town, Missouri. 

Page Twenty-four 




^fft Cottege ^vntiriQi 



The Special Seniors are nearly all busy either putting 
their training into practice or going on with their work. 

Helen Jones is giving private lessons in St. Louis. 

Helen Harrison and Freda Fenton are continuing their 
study of music in St. Louis. 

Mary Shastid and Lucile dinger are both going on 
M'ith their work under the direction of the Swarthouts at 
Millikin. 

Nina Slaten is now living at Springfield, 111. 

Elizabeth Williams and Hazel Hamilton are both stay- 
ing at home this year. 

Mildred Seamen is expecting to return to I. W. C. and 
take up work tow^ard her degree. 

Florence Haller is teaching Domestic Science in her 
home town and enjoying the work as well as the good 
time she is having. 

Edith Heit is also teaching in her home school at Fort 
Wayne, Ind. 

The advent of a little son, William Lewis, brought joy 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Fay. The mother, for- 
merly Emily Jane Allen, was a member of the class of 
1913. 

THE SOPHOMORE CONTEST. 

"Have we got it? Sure we've got it! We had it all 
last year and we have it again this. We have only been 
waiting to show it. Our beloved upper classmen gave 
us the opportunity when they put us up as candidates for 
the Mantanzas trip. Realizing how hard it would be for 
any one to decide on the "prettiest , wittiest and best 
loved," we endeavored to put ourselves before the public 
eye in such a way that these particular charms, above 

Page Twenty-five 



y^ 



^i)e College ^reettngK 




mentioned, would stand out clearly. What we think of 
ourselves is self evident and the little inscriptions "I look 
good to me," "I'm a soph," "Shout for me," were merely 
to help those who aren't aware of our excellent qualities. 
We also helped the others to decide by going down to the 
dining room in a body, floating balloons full of pep, in the 
"only" colors, "red and white." We helped make our 
wittiness more evident by singing fitting songs, but our 
beauty and lovable qualities spoke for themselves. Some 
of us fearing our unquestioned qualifications for the 
offices would not be noticed, formed a triple alliance and 
in a strenuous campaign tried to win favor by appearing in 
unusual attire in the dining room and by decorating the 
college with flaring posters. Others brave enough to 
stand alone put convincing posters alongside the "trip- 
lets," in the elevator, front hall, and other conspicuous 
places. 

The results of the election were reported at our great 
"sing," each student and faculty member casting their 
votes. From the prettiest, wittiest, and most loved class 
in school were chosen: 

Prettiest — Barbara Weber. 

Wittiest — Mary Harrison. 

Most loved — Marie Louise Whitbeck. 

Hoorah for the upper classmen who appreciate us and 
hoorah for the class with pep. 

A Sophomore. 



Page Twenty-six 



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I GARMENTS FOR YOUNG WOMEN! | 

[ The newest and most popular fashions of t!ie ilay | 

I reach our show room first — straight from the work- | 

I rooms of the New York workers. Attractive styles, | 

i = 

I for the youngs women, especially, are shown here in | 

I profusion. | 



Coats 

Waists 



Suits 
Skirts 



Dresses 
Lingerie 



LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 




COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

Large assortment of footwear 
for every occasion. 

Dress, Street and Bed-room 
Footwear 

s: o :f IP s K. s' 

We Repair Shoes 



I J. A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER i 



I THE COLLEGE STORE f 

z E 

I Pennants, Stationery, Tennis Goods, Drug's, School | 

I Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory | 

I Books and Photo Albums | 

I "PLEASED customers" — OUR MOTTO | 

I Goods Delivered i 

X S 

I Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St. and Square | 

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Otto Speith 

UDonie iportraiture 



Our Home Portraiture won the Silver Medal this year at the 
Peoria State Convention 



349 East State Street 



Studio: Southwest Corner Square 



SEE 

Bonansinga 

For Fancy Fruit and 

Confectionery 

72 East Side Square 



"The Home of the Crispette" 

The Sanitary Pop-corn 
and Crispette Shop 

Pop-corn that melts In your mouth 
Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

East State Street 



4 

JIDl 







I FLORETH CO. 

I Leaders in Milinery, Coats, 
I Suits and all your Dry 
I Goods needs 

I Always lowest possible prices 
I don't forget us 



Coover&Shrevej 

Have a complete line of | 

Drugs, Kodai<s, Perfumes, | 

Stationery and Holiday Gifts | 

We do Developing- & Printing | 

East and West Side Square | 



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Latest in JEWELRY, 
CUT GLASS and 

SILVERWARE 



AT 



Russeil & Lyon's 

Oldest Established Jewelers 
in Central Illinois 

Both Phones 96 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say | 

We can furnish your | 

Shoes and Party Slippers | 

in the popular styles, I 

leathers, and | 

fabrics I 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Member State and National Associations 



McCULLOUGH STUDIO 



EAST SIDE SQUARE I 



D. S. — "Will you please brush that fly off of our 
hats?" 

Dr. H., in chapel — "The organ keeps on blowing when 
we stop." 



<§rapf)ic 
Concern 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAI. OCCASIONS 



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I For those who discriminate 

I We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to 

i please the students who come to our city. We select only the 

I best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. 

I Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 

I Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

I Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 

I College functions. 

I Vickery 3c Merrigan 

I CATERERS 

I 227 West State Street 



[Both Phones 309 



I SAFEST PIvACE TO TRADE 

|fjlLLERBY'§ 

I DRY GOODS STORE 



West Side Square 



Brady Bros. 

Kverything' in Hardware, 
House-furnishing's and Paints 

45-47 South Side Square 



Miss J. — "The tables near the door are shirt waist 
tables. Those at the other end of the dining room are 
tor one piece dresses and pumps." 

Seraphina — "Oh, do we have to wear them there?" 



i 

1 C* V* Frankenbcrg 


E stablished 1890 


1 Ladies' and Gents' Tailoring 


y^/ U 


1 Cleaning, Altering, 
1 Repairing 

1 Improved Machinery, 


Ci.OAKS. SU/TS. FUKS ANOMlLUNERY^ 


1 Best Work 


Low Prices Square Dealing- 


1 215 East State Street 


Keep us busy 



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s s 

I riDuUenli & Ibamilton I 



CLEANLINESS 



Confectioners 

SERVICE 



QUALITY 

Creams, Ices, Frappes, Sundaes, Sodas, Parfaits, 

Mousses and all Hot Drinks 

Home-made Candies and Salted Nuts 

The Store of Merit 

Phones 70 216 East State Street 



I Why pay more for no more? 

I Let us sell you SHOES 

I It means more spending money 
for you 

We cater to your wants 

A. SMITH 

The Popular Price East State Street 
Shoe Man 

WE REPAIR SHOES 



I. M. BUNCE & Co. 



|prfntitf0 



211 East Morgan Street 



D. S. — "I thought you were going bathing this morn- 
ing." 

A. T. (after a hard rain in the night) — "I was but it's 
too wet." 



HARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers, 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouset, South Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greenhouses, Bell 775 



McGINNIS' I 

The Young Ladies' Shoe Store i 

We carry a full line of Evening Slippers! 
in all colors. | 

If it's new, we have it | 

JAS. McGINNIS & 00.1 



East Side Square | 

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ll ^ 

I Want j^ 

I Cut flowers n 

I FROM S 

I JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

i Both Phones 



I You will find a complete line of 

I FANCY GROCERIES 

I at 

I Walker's Grocery 

I Home Cookingf a Specialty 

I Both Phones 205 E. Morgan Street 



Job Printing 

Of All Kinds 

John K* Long 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 



213 West Morgan Stree 
Illinois Phone 400 



Seraphina (shopping) — "I want some succotash 
braid." 



I Dorwari Market. 

I ALL KINDS OF 

jPRESH and SALT MEATS 
j FISH, POULTRY, Etc. 

|Both phones 196 230 W. State St. 

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KODAK FINISHING 

Vulcan Roll Films 

Cameras from $2.00 up 
Everything- strictly first class 

Vail & Vail 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. 

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THE STATIONERY STORE THAT SERVES I 



OUR MOTTO; 
Service and 

Satisfaction 



Milmert'6 



OUR MOTTO: 
Service and 

Satisfaction 



Headquarters for 

STATIONERY, POST CARDS, BOOKS, MAGAZINES, 
PENNANTS, NOVElvTiES, CAMERAS AND 

PHOTO SUPPIvIES 
LEATHER GOODS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 
Table Runners, Matts, Cushions and Piano Scarfs 

Expert Developing and Finishing 

Open Days and Nights until 9:00 P. M. 
Illinois Phone 450 
59 Southeast Corner Square Jacksonville, Illinois 



Miss C. — "I just couldn't get it through her head, I 
just couldn't get it through a Mothershead (mother's 
head)." 



Cafe Bat5 


H. J. & L. M. SMITH 




ant) annex for XaMes 


Art Needle Work 




221-223 East State Street 


and Millinery 






211 West state street 




Illinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 







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Phones 800 

ROBERTS BROS. 

DRUGS AND GRGCCRiES 

We guarantee every purchase 

and delivery or money 

back 

ROBERTS BROS. 

29 South Side Square Phones 800 



S. S. Kresffe C( 

5c & IOC Store 

A popular place for Colleg 
Girls 



The Store tor 



IDRKSS GOODS and SILKS 



^^^9^ 



DRY GOODS STORE 



Kodak Shop 



A. H. Atherton & So 



Under Farrell's Bank 



We Develop and Print Prompt 



Seraphina — "Isn't there a great musician by the name 
of Faust?" 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 



I 230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111. 
I Illinois Phone 388 

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Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



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I Visit I 

I SCHRAM'S I 

I Jewelry Store I 

I We have ,^ood-lookin^£f and good-wearing goods | 

I Will be pleased to show them | 



i All the Facult}-, Students and Friends 
|of the College should have a Checking 
|or Savings Account with 

|f. G. FARRELL & CO. 

I BANKERS 

I F. E. Farrell, President 

I E. E. Crabtree, Vice-President 

I H. H. Potter, Cashier 

I M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier 



yAYLORjl 

Grocery 

A g-ood place to trade \ 
221 West State Street I 



Miss N. introduces Miss Bright as Miss Wright. 

Miss Bright — "It isn't right to say Wright, it's Bright." 



College Printing Specialists 

Year Books College Calendars 

Every Kind of Printing and Binding 

WRITE U5 

Pantagraph Printing and Stationery Co* 

BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS 



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The I^atest in 

Co) lege Jewelry, Society 

Stationery, Bracelet 

Watches, Silver and 

Cut Glass 

AT 

BASSETT'S 

21 South Side Square 



C. J. Deppe & Co. 

Known for "Ready-TO- 

wear" and Popular 

Priced Dry Goods 



i Piepenbrings Variety Store 

I One block east of College 




BROThS? 



HERE TO 


PLEASE 


Candies 




Cakes 


Cookies 




Pics 


Sandwiches 




Pop on Ice 


Groceries 


California Fruits 


School S 


uppiies 



Jacksonville's foremost Store for Men 
and Specialties for Women 

Mannish Sweaters 

Mackinaw Coats, KnittedToques 

Mannish Rain Coats and Hats 

Trunks and Handbags 



Seraphina (nudging faculty member who sat at the 
table serving) — "That's what you get for sitting there." 



Ladies* Late Style Furs 



ARE SOLD BY 



Frank Byrns S^* 



Store 



Cheriy's Livery 

Finest Light and Heavy | 

Livery 

Lowest Rates 



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Cafe 



Confectionary 



Catering 



Soda 



Candies i 



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RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



R. W. to A. W.— "Oh! Have you a floating rib? 
must be careful not to touch it." 



I SHEET MUSIC, MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 

I TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 

I AND SUPPLIES 

I 19 SOUTH SIDE PUBWC SQUARB 



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k<illlHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIUMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinUMlhlltlllllllMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIMIIIIIIIIIIH 

I MoIIenbrock & McCuIIough 



SUCCBSSORS TO 



McDougairs Studio 



234i West State Street 



Illinois Phone 808 



5 

jDr. Albyn LincoivN Adams 




OCCULIST AND AURIST 




to the State School for the Blind 


DR. ALPHA B. APPLEBEE 


323 West State Street 


Dentist 


Practice limited to diseases of the 




Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 






326 West state St. 


Both Telephones 




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Beautiful College Pennants 


•;^Hpxp noX Jl \JlS 


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■E aq :;^upinoM noj^ -^i p-E9J 


Each 9in. x 24in. 


o:|. QMop 9pisdn siij; njn; 


PRINCETON, CORNKIvI., 
MICHIGAN 


pinoAv nOiC M.3ii>i ;snC j 


Each 7in. x 2iin. 




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Any I^eading Colleges of 
Your Selection 




All of our best qualitj, in their 
proper colors, with colored emblems. 


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Either assortment, for limited time, 
sent postpaid for 50 cents and five 
stamps to cover shipping costs. 


DENTIST 


Write us for prices before placing 
orders for felt novelties of all kinds. 


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Both Phones 760 


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Dayton, Ohio 









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COLLEGE GIRLS: | 

See our Motor Coats, Mackinaws and Sweaters | 

Also Ladies' Holeproof Hosiery | 

LUKEMAN BROTHERS 



Girls^ Patronize Our Advertisers 



Ayers National Bank 

Founded 1852 



Capital 
;i5200,000 

Surplus 
^50,000 

Deposits 
^2,000,000 




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Depository 

Postal Savings 
Depository 

Member of 

Federal 

Reserve Bank 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
Special Window for Ladies 
Ladies' Waiting Room 
We make a feature of Ladies' Accounts, and have 
provided facilities for their exclusive use 



OFFICERS 



F. Dnnlap, President 
idrew Russel, Vice President 
M. Hockenhull, Vice President 
as. B. Graff, Vice President 
J. Rodgers, Vice President 



ren P. Thompson 
ward F. Goltra 
in W. Leach 



Arthur Vannier, Assistant Cashier 
DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhnll 
M. F. Dunlap 



O. F. Buffe, Cashier 
R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 
H. C. Clement, Asst. Cashier 
W. G. Goebel, Asst. Cashier 
H. K. Chenoweth, Asst. Cashier 



Harry M. Capps 
O. F. Buffe 
Andrew Russel 



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Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1860 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEG, 

I 

College of LiberalArts 
College of Music 
School of Fine Arts 
School of Expression 
School of Home Economics 

A Standard College — j 

Regular college and academy courses 
leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 
inently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located 
in the Middle West, in a beautiful, | 

dignified, old college town, noted for 
its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking for a good college. j 

Call or address. Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, 111. 




"<ltWIIMtlMWWM«IMH>IIWWIIIIM>llllllimmMHIIHHMIIMMIimiHlllimiHIIIWmilll«IIIMIIIHIMIIMHIIIIIMMMHIWIHIIIWIIMIII^ 



Wi)z College ^reEtingS 

^ Tht College GrteLiii^^s is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illiuois Wouiai!'.-' College. 

€f| Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the fifteenth of each month. 

Ijl Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
€j[ Entered at Jacksonville Postoflfice as second class matter. 

Contents 

Editorial 3 

The Matanzas Page of a Memory Book 4 

Matanzas Jokes 7 

Starting for Dreamland 9 

Sunrise on the Hills 13 

A New Girl's Diary 14 

Roland G. Usher's Pan-Germanism 17 

Y. W. C. A. Notes 18 

Founder's Day 20 

Class Notes — Senior 21 

Junior 22 

Sophomore 22 

Freshman 23 

Society Notes . , 23 

Departments — Art 25 

Expression 25 

College of Music 25 

Clubs— Indiana Club 26 

Egyptian Club 27 

The College Sing 27 

Alumnae Notes 28 

What About the Annual? 29 

Hike Clubs 29 

Exchanges 3° 

Must Attend Chapel 3° 

Thh 

Gkjvphic Arts 

Concern 




1 

-^ 



"Red o'er the {oresi peers the setting sun 
The line of yellow light dies East away 

That crown'd the eastern copse: and chill and dun 
Falls on the moor the brief November day-" 

— Keble 





ICbe ColicQc (3r eetinge 



Vol. XVIII Jacksonville, 111., November, 1914 No. 2 



Faculty Advisor — Miss Mary Anderson. 

EdiTOR-in-Chiev — Helena Munson. 

Associate and Alumnae Editor — Winifred Burmeister, 

Assistant Editors — Helen McGhee, Elaine Buhrnian. 

Business Manager — Audrey Berryman. 

Assistant Business Managers — Alma Harmel, Mary Harrison. 



As the first weeks of school are passing into the first 
months and most of us find that this is a place for work, 
we must realize that time is valuable as such. As 
Dr. Marker has told us, we have paid for the time that 
we spend here and it is up to us to get all we can from it. 
A high standard has been set before us in the classroom 
and by some means, even tho it may necessitate rising 
early in the mornings, we are forcing ourselves to measure 
up to this standard. However, the broadest college life 
does not consist in making good grades alone. Nor does 
it consist of just a leisurely good time. The ideal college 
woman is she who does her classroom work well, enters 
into college activities and is ready for the jolly good time 
when it comes. 

In order to reach this ideal, we must learn to value 
time. Concentration is the greatest of all virtues in study- 
ing. If we can study in spite of surroundings, we need 
not miss our class party or have to waken others with a 
clanging alarm clock. On the other hand, we need to 
learn to make the most of the time spent in having a 
good time. I have seen girls who thought they were hav- 
ing a good time because they were making a noise. If these 
girls had directed the same amount of energy in some 
purposeful way, for instance in a lively basketball game, 

Page Three 




9Sui)a3a§) aS;ii(i3 H'3f, 



we should not have to have so many student government 
rules, we would have a livelier college, and those girls 
would find more real pleasure and at the same time would 
be in fact "making good." 

We desire to make an explanation for an oversight in 
editing the last issue of the paper. The president of the 
Athletic Association, in her article showed in a very en- 
thusiastic way how the girls might make the most of their 
Mondays. It was her thought that, since so much money 
is spent for "eats," some should go for open air sports as 
well. Because the Peacock Inn is a favorite place where 
the girls go for such things, she mentioned it instead of 
making a general statement. It was not her intention to 
advise the girls not to go to this one place. Because the 
editorial staff so well understood the spirit in which it was 
written, they failed to see the business man's point of 
view. We did not intend to discriminate in any way and 
the Greetings urges the girls to patronize the Peacock Inn 
because of their courteous treatment and as one of its ad- 
vertisers. 

THE MATANZAS PAGE OF A MEMORY BOOK. 

Yes, daughter, that's the Lake Matanzas section you're 
looking at now. Where and what was it? Well, I'll 
start in at the beginning. It was a lake about fifty miles 
from Jacksonville to which the upper classmen were al- 
lowed to go on a camping trip. Long before the event 
came off, that was all you could hear about in the halls 
or at the table. Every place you went you heard "Ma- 
tanzas," until the poor people who couldn't go had to 
hold their ears. 

Do you see that grocery bill on that page? That was 
the result of much thot and planning. You think forty- 
two loaves of bread a lot? Well, I wonder what you 
would have said to four dozen loaves when there were 
five less people? I should say we did have good eats. 

Page Ponr. 




Cfje Cottege ^vzttinqi 



Nothing ever tasted quite as good as that beefsteak smoth- 
ered in onions or those carmelized sweet potatoes and 
fried chicken Sunday noon. But the peeling and sHcing 
the onions is quite a different matter. Only one can of 
tomato soup for twenty-nine people! Well, mistakes 
will happen, but that was supposed to be for tomato 
welsh rarebit. 

This is a picture that was taken just before the train 
pulled out. Why is that girl talking so earnestly to the 
brakeman? Because the train was nearly ready to leave 
and a sack with something inside that looked like a jug 
which might have contained gasoline was still reposing 
beside of the station. Was it put on? No, as we pulled 
out everyone's eyes were fastened on that as if by men- 
tal power they might be able to bring it with them, for 
we were wondering how we could cook for twenty-nine. 

That? Oh, that's the station at Lake Matanzas. All 
those trunks and suit-cases? Why, you know that it 
might have been cold and we all had to take plenty to 
keep us warm. Yes, it was all piled into that one wagon. 
Of course it took some figuring to do it, but after the man 
was shown once it was all that was necessary. 

The next picture was taken along the road going to 
Lake Matanzas. On the edge of the picture is pasted what 
is known as a Matanzas sandburr, a special variety, with 
extra long stickers. They account for all the queer posi- 
tions shown in the picture. 

This is the Oak Lodge cottage. No doubt it doesn't 
look as if it could hold twenty-nine people, but it did for 
everything but sleeping. The other cottage is the Doug- 
las cottage, where nine people stayed who didn't mind 
being kept awake at nights. 

Yes, isn't the lake pretty, with the big trees along the 
side and the boats filled with girls out on the water? But 
something that was even prettier was the moonlight on 
the lake at night, just as the moon came above the tops 
of the trees. 

Page Five 



m 



tS^t CoDege ^xtttinzfi 




This next picture is rather indistinct because it was 
taken around the big campfire in the evening, as the pop- 
corn was being passed. Such jolly, good times as we had 
singing, talking and telling stories. 

The next is a picture of several girls just ready to go 
off for a long walk. Oh yes, v/e were far enough ad- 
vanced in the idea of freedom of womanhood so that 
we wore bloorners. But it was more because the boats 
leaked so that our skirts were always wet around the bot- 
tom than any idea of a declaration of independence that 
we wore them. 

This picture was taken just as dinner was put on 
the table Sunday. But how we ever waited to have a 
picture taken after we saw that big platter of chicken is 
more than 1 can see. M3', but didn't it taste good. Noth- 
ing quite like a long row and a walk to make things taste 
like "the good eats we have at home." 

This is a picture of Miss Anderson sitting by her fav- 
orite tree, looking out on the lake. Here is another pic- 
ture of her with the wind blowing her hair, which usually 
looked as if the wind never had touched it. 

These are some of the pictures taken while four of 
the bravest were trying the water of Lake Matanzas to 
see if it was wet. From the squeals and gasps that were 
heard, I guess, it was not only wet, but a little chilly also. 
They were able to keep themselves warm by trying to 
keep their feet off the "itchy" bottom. 

Oh, that's a picture of a jungle that was supposed to 
contain pecan trees somewhere within its depths. If it 
did, we are not able to say where, because all the pecans 
we might have found would not have repaid us for going 
any further into that jungle. 

We had fish Monday noon for dinner, and such quan- 
tities! Platterful after platterful was brought on, which 
seemed to disappear as if by magic. Was it caught by 
the girls who woke everyone up so early in the morning? 

Page Six 




tirte College 4lreettng£( 




I'm afraid that poor little fish would have been lost in 
such a multitude. 

No one really felt as if it were nearly time to leave 
until everyone started to pack and clean the cottages. 
Others were hunting for their summer wraps for which 
there had been so little use. This is a boatful going out 
for a last row. Do you see their long faces? It did 
seem rather a doleful matter when you think that it was 
the last time many of us would ever be there. 

It was a much quieter company that got on the train 
than had gotten off, but that didn't last long. The car 
was soon ringing to the good old I. VV. C. songs. What 
wouldn't I give now to hear, "U rah rah, our dercr 1. W. 
C." sung- the way it was that night! 

Winifred Burmeister, 'i5. 

>?» 

MATANZAS JOKES. 

iMary H. — "I want to put on my niid:'^^', but tlie^e 'sn'i 
any place to put it on," 

Irene C. — "I think bloomers are awful, dirty white 
stockings are worse, but Peril's hat is superlative." 

Helen D. — "Anybody might think by looking at my 
mosquito bites that I am developing muscle." 

Ruth P. — "I have lost the dishrag. If I could see it I 
would know where I put it." 

B. W. — "What kind of nationality are these burrs? " 

R. W. — "Southern Europe — Spanish needles." 

Som.e nev/ words that were coined at Lake Matanzas 
are: "Wuzzy," meaning fudge, and "ishy," meaning the 
bottom of the lake. 

Ruth Patton was "wrong side out under the boat." 

Margaret C. (out in the boat listening to the echoes) 
— "Oh, listen to our shadows." 

It was said that there were oceans of water in the bot- 
tom of one boat. 

Page Seven 




JEi^t College ^reettngtf 



Winifred B. — "The coffee tasted undone." 

Helen D. — "Here, take my camera." 
L.H.— "Where shall I put it? " 
H. D.— "In the Greetings." 

Margaret C. — "The only Latin words I know are 'Wie 
gehts?" 

Ruth P. — "I wish my feet were not so ungainly." 

F. H. and M. H. (coming in from lake in a boat which 

they had paddled canoe fashion.) 

F. H. — "We have named our canoe The C. S.' " 

M. H. — " 'S. C — Christian Science canoe, because 

you think you have one and you ain't." 

By reason of there being two Miss Andersons and two 
Mary Louises in the party they were spoken of as Miss 
Anderson collectively, and Mary Louise collectively, or 
the Mary Louisae. 

We wonder what prejudice Ruth Want has against 
Ethel Glaspie that would warrant her in throwing her 
wash water in Ethel's hat? 

R. P. — "Say, Miss Anderson." 

Miss J, Anderson looks up inquiringly. 

Ruth — "Oh, Miss Anderson — collectively." 

Miss Anderson— "Well, what is it, Ruth?" 

Ruth — "Oh, well, I started to speak to you and then 

thot it would be more polite to include Miss Anderson, and 

— well — 

Miss M. A. — "But what did you want? " 

Ruth — "Oh, I'm so pressed now I don't remember 

what I was going to say." 

R. P. to Miss Jo Anderson — "When I know where one 
Miss Anderson is, it's always the other one I want." 

Page Eight 



Witt College 4^reettngK 




STARTING FOR DREAMLAND. 

Time — Saturday night (the first night), October 3, 
1914. 

Place — Lake Matanzas, at "The Cove." 

Dramatic Personae — Helen, Peril, Irene, Winifred, 
Audrey, Josephine and "The Mary Louisae." 

Scene — Enclosed porch of the cottage, lighted only 
by beautiful moonlight. On the floor are spread four 
mattresses, which are occupied as follows: 

No. 1 — Barbara and Helen. 

No. 2 — Peril and Irene. 

No. 3 — Winifred. 

No. 4 — "The Mary Louisae," 

Audrey and Josephine are inside the cottage at the 
opening of the story. 

Irene — "I'm hungry. Where are those eats?" 

Helen — "Go get those cookies and cheese straws out 
of my suit case." 

Barbara — "And that bottle of olives on the cook 
stove," 

Irene — "All right. Anyone want anything else?" 

(Exits into house.) 

M. L. P. — "Peril, I thought you said you had a box 
of chocolates." 

Peril — "I did. It's in my suit case." 

The M. L.'s — "Can't we have some? " 

Peril (resignedly) — "Oh, I suppose so." 

The M. L.s — "Oh, Irene, Peril said to bring her choc- 
olates out of her suit case." 

Barbara— "And don't forget the olives." 

Helen — "Nor the cheese straws." 

Winifred — "And please bring me a drink of water," 

Irene — "Is there anything else? " 

Peril — "Nothing, dear, only don't knock over any- 
thing more than you can help. My glasses are around 
there somewhere." 

Page Nine 



Witt College Greetings; 



Irene — "I fear I came perilously near to breaking 
something when I knocked over that last suit case. Hope 
it wasn't anything valuable." 

M. L. P. — "Well, I suppose it was mine, and I suppose 
that that jelly glass suffered. I always get all banged up 
up here." 

Peril — "Remember how her suit case fell off last 
year? " 

Audrey (from inside the house) — "Yes, and how we 
rode the wagon and tried to hold them all on? " 

M. L. P. — "It looked as if it had been held on." 

(Irene appears in the doorway with the various eata- 
bles, which she passes to each of the company. Audrey 
and Jo come out and sit on Helen and Barbara's bed. For 
a few minutes comparative quiet reigned. Then) : 

Winifred — "Oh, these awful curlers! 1 can't put my 
head in a comfortable position at all." 

(Groans of assent all over the porch.) 

Peril — "Don't you wish your hair were naturally 
curly, Miss Winnie? " 

Helen (crossly) — "Oh, go to sleep." 

Peril — "Don't be cross, Helen." 

Irene — "Jo, you and Audrey had better bring out 
your mattress and join the crowd." 

Audrey — "Let's do. I'm afraid we'll miss something 
if we don't." 

Jo — "Well, don't anybody say a word till we get 
back." (Exit Jo and Audrey.) 

Helen — "Nobody's going to talk. Everyone's going 
to sleep." 

(Enter Jo and Audrey, with their mattresses). 

Winifred — "Oh, dear, will I have to move over? " 

The M. L's — "Well, don't come over here." 

Peril — "And don't get near this bed." 

Jo — "Oh, shut up, everybody, and help us." 

Page Ten 



Witt CoOese ^xtttinzi 



M. L. W. — "Well, don't shake out vour sheets on us. 
If you've got so much sand, pass it around to others. We 
don't want a sand bath." 

(Irene gives a long sigh and a groan.) — 

Helen — "I do wish you'd get settled sometime and 
go to sleep." 

M. L. P. — "I didn't know that our main object in 
coming to Matanzas was to sleep — we can do that at 
home." 

Peril — "I should say so." 

Audrey — "Let's sing some 'Sleep, Kentucky Babe.' " 

(Peril, Audrey, Jo and Barbara sing. At close of 
song, Helen remarks, sarcastically) ; 

"What a nightmare! You might at least have mercy 
on 'Ship Ahoy' even if you haven't any on us." 

Audrey — "Oh, get over it. Wake up." 

M. L. W. — "Cheer up — and see what's coming next." 

Peril starts singing, "There is a tavern in the town." 
All but Helen and Irene join in. 

Irene — "Oh, I'm so thirsty. Won't somebody get 
me a drink. Barbara, your're a Sophomore — get up, 
please, and bring us a whole bucket of water." 

(Barbara arises, with a sigh, and exits into house.) 

M. L. W. (whispers)— "Hope they forget I'm one, 
too." 

(Everybody quiets down after Barbara has given all 
a drink.) 

Peril — "Well, goodnight, all." 

Chorus — "Goodnight." 

Winifred — "I'm not a bit sleepy, tho." 

M. L. P. — "I never am — at night — if there is anything 
going on." 

(Peril starts singing a German song, after which Au- 
drey is inspired to give another.) 

Helen (very much annoyed) — "Have you any idea 
what time it is getting to be? " 

Page Eleven 



Wtft College Greetings; 




Chorus — "About twelve — or maybe one," 

Helen — "It's nearly three. I know I'll never get to 
sleep, for it takes me two hours to compose myself." 

(Gales of laughter and various puns of word "com- 
pose" proposed.) 

Audrey — "Now, Helen, if you don't like our company, 
you can go up to Oak Lodge and crawl in with somebody." 

M. L. W. — "This is no place for a nervous woman." 

M. L. P. — "Oh, let's all of us go up to Oak Lodge 
and serenade them." 

Helena — "Well go, if you want to — and let us sensible 
people go to sleep." 

M. L. P. — "Now, Helen, you might as well get over it 
and stop showing off that beautiful disposition of yours. 
We're here for fun, and we only have two days and two 
nights, so let's make the most of it." 

Peril — "That's what I say." 

Helen — "Well, if I were some people I'd go jump in 
the lake, or something." 

Winifred — "Oh, get over it, all of you, and let's not 
fuss. Tomorrow — or I guess it's today, to be exact — is 
The Day of Peace." 

M.L. W. — "Sure peaceful here!" 

Barbara — "Oh, let's do go to sleep." 

Audrey — "Where have you been this last half hour? " 

Barbara — "Trying to sleep, but it's impossible." 

(Irene sighs and groans again.) 

Peril — "Poor child — does it want anything, bless its 
heart!" 

Irene (expressively) — "Oh, no.' 

Helen (cuttingly) — "Oh, no — just let everybody en- 
joy themselves. We'll suffer in silence from now on." 

(Laughter again.) 

Peril — "Goodnight, Helen, goodnight all — be com- 
posed, fair Helen." 

Helen — "Of course you want the last word!" 

oilence at last. ^^q be continued) 

Page Twelve 



Wi^t CoUcge ^vtttin^i 




SUNRISE ON "THE HILLS." 

There is, in a small section of my country, a long 
stretch of rolling prairie land that is locally known as 
"The Hills." I had always experienced a keen desire to 
watch from their vantage point the sunrise. Truly they 
were wonderful at any hour of the day, but somehow I 
fancied that at the dawn in the glorious autumn time they 
would be possessed of even greater splendor. 

Upon reaching the summit of the larger hill of the 
range, I was impressed with the feeling of an intruder, 
who had been admitted into that strange gray country by 
mistake, and that even the slightest sound would greatly 
interrupt the mysterious silence. There seemed but one 
assurance that the sun ever lived in that vast gray land — 
the fragrance of wild crabapples which came floating up 
from the misty valley below filling the air with a spicy 
tang. The faint gray outline of the horizon deepened; 
the perceptible brightening announced that dawn was 
rapidly approaching. "The Hills" took on a purplish 
tinge, the eastern sky was streaked with irregular bands 
of crimson and purple. A slight breeze stirred the tall 
aftermath of prairie grasses about me and playfully chased 
the mists dov/n the hillsides, revealing the beauties of the 
maples in their autumn garments of red and gold. The 
sun was partially in view, not dazzling to the eye as yet, 
but glorious to look upon. The mists, in seeming fear 
of so mighty a power, scurried away out of sight; new 
beauties and old landmarks were disclosed on the slopes 
and distant landscape, for the sun had risen on "The 
Hills." Lavina Jones, '18. 



There have been picnics galore this month. Many a 
"table" has decided to enjoy the freshness of the morn- 
ing air. The Faculty have been noted for the kinds of 
fires they build. 

Page Thirteen 




QPbe CoUese <$reettns£( 



y^ 



A NEW GIRL'S DIARY. 

Monday, Sept. 14, 5 a. m. 

Well, this surel}' is lovely weather for starting to 
school. First rain we've had for three months, and then 
to think it had to come just in time to spoil my new hat. 
It just matches my feelings, but that is small consolaion 
these days, when everything is contrasts. 

7 :00 a. m. — That is an interesting looking girl across 
the aisle from me. I wonder if she could be going to 
Jacksonville, too. But then, if she is, she will probably 
turn out to be an old girl, who would think me fresh for 
speaking to her. 

8:30 a. m. — I didn't have to make first advances to 
her, after all, for when she had finished her magazine 
story, she looked around, and seeming to spot me as a new 
college girl, began to be friendly right away. She must 
be a senior, she's so dignified and seems to know so much. 

11:30 a. m. — And now we are actually coming into 
Jacksonville. Irene (that's my new friend) says that is 
the school for the blind that we can see over the tree 
tops, and that it is quite close to the Woman's College, 
only she says we call it I. W. C. I'm so excited. 

12:00 m — I wish I were back home. I know people 
there,too. Here everybody seems to know everybody 
else, but I dont know anyone. It was awfully nice of the 
Y. W. C. A. girls to meet us at the train, though. I al- 
most fell off the steps right into the arms of one, and she 
brought me here, introduced me to the dean, and showed 
me up to my room. Its an awfully bare, queer looking 
place. No curtains, no rocking chairs, and just the bare 
mattress on the bed. I wish my roommate would come 
so we could get fixed up. Theres a bell. I wonder what 
its for. 

4:00 p. m. — Well, 1 will say this, they give us good 
things to eat here. After we got up from lunch 1 thought 
I would look around a little. The Y. W. C. A. girls had 

Page Fourteen 




Kf}e CoOege 4lreetings( 




an information bureau downstairs in the front hall, so I 
went down there and asked if we were allowed to go to 
church on Sundays. I thought the girl at the desk looked 
at me rather funny, but she said, "Yes, certainly. Any 
church you want to." I didn't see any harm in asking for 
I have heard that in some schools they have church right 
in the same building. 

9:00 p. m. — My roommate has come! What a lame 
sentence for such a wonderful fact. 

Tuesday, 9:00 a. m, 

I thought sure the school must be on fire this morning, 
for the awfullest bells kept ringing. 1 jumped out of bed 
and landed in the middle of the floor, while Pauline lay 
there laughing at me. She didn't start to dress until five 
minutes before seven. 

4:00 p. m. — I've registered and of all of the com- 
plicated things! Every faculty member I came up against 
wanted me to take everything but what I wanted to, and 
I usually couldn't take them because there were conflicts. 
I still have one, and I'm sure I don't know what to do. 

Wednesday, 1 1 :00 a. m. 

Our first chapel is over. Dr. Marker, the president, 
gave a very nice talk, that made me feel as if I might 
amount to something;- sometime, after all. And I have 
signed up for two classes, French and mathematics, so 
far. Such a time as I had finding those class rooms. 
Of course they had to be at opposite ends of the building. 
One of the old girls piloted me to the math, room after 1 
Iiad been wandering around on the basement corridor. 
I'm beginning to get straightened out now, though. 

Thursday, 3 :00 p. m. 

I have another roommate. Pauline said she wa;ited 
a girl with more get-up to her; that 1 was too good. I 
certainly was never accused of that before. Seems queer 
1 had to come to college to find it out. My roommate 
nov/ is Ruth Bartlett, another new girl. We have been 
having lots of fun fixing up our room, and have it almost 

Page Fifteen 




^i)e CoUese ^vntitiQi 



finished now. Oh, and I've discovered that the girl I 
came with, the first day, is only a sophomore. 

Friday. 

I got along fine in French this morning because I had 
a cold. During chapel we were invited to the Y. W. C. A. 
party for the new girls, tomorrow night. 

Sunday evening. 

I had a lovely time at the party last night. The girls, 
all looked so pretty and I found out who lots of them were 
that I didn't know before. Went to church this morning, 
and this afternoon to the first Y. W. C. A. service. The 
president and several of the girls gave such nice talks, but 
I'm not sure I want to join. You probably have to be 
awfully serious. I wrote home to mother this afternoon 
that I'm just dying for her to come and see me. It seems 
ages since I left home. 

Tuesday night. 

Yesterday was our holiday and we were as busy doing 
nothing special that I didn't have time to write in my 
diary. Today I have had eight hours of laboratory and 
my head aches so that L can't do any thing else. I wish 
mother would come. 

Friday. 

We are having the most exciting time. The upper 
class girls, that is, the juniors and seniors, are giving a 
camping trip next week and they have room for three 
sophomores. So the three girls who have the most votes 
as "the prettiest, the wittiest, and the one best loved" 
will get to go. The sophomores have been parading 
around all morning in white dresses and red ties, soliciting 
votes. At lunch today they had tables all to themselves, 
and kept singing the craziest songs. It was awfully jolly, 
though. Then toward the last, when they began to sing 
something else, there was a commotion, and several girls 
stood up. I didn't know what it was for, but everyone 
else was doing it, so I did, too. Then someone told me 

Page Sixteen 



Witt CoSege ^ttttinqi 




that it was the college song, and we always stand to sing 
it. 

This evening, at dinner, three sophomores came in 
late, dressed as the prettiest, the wittiest, and the best 
loved. I'm going to vote for the one who was dressed up 
in the clown suit, for she seems to be the wittiest one here. 
I heard one girl say that it was a pity they didn't know how 
to spell Mantanzas, when they put it on their banner. 

1 can hardly wait for the college sing tomorrow night, 
when we will know who gets to go. 

One thing I've noticed, too. The girls who have been 
jolliest today are some of the leaders in Y. W. I guess 
I will join. 

[.wrote to mother this afternoon that she needn't be 
in a hurry about coming to see me, after all, but I wish 
she would send be a big box of eats. 

Oct. 10 — The girls who went to Matanzas last Satur- 
day came back Monday and they've been talking nothing 
but Matanzas ever since. I haven't heard yet of anything 
really exciting that happened up there, but they surely 
had a good time. I believe I will try to be a popular 
Sophomore next year, and maybe I will get to go, too, 
for in spite of all the picnics and parties we have had, it 
seems to be the thing of the year. L. H. 'l5. 

ROLAND G. USHER'S PAN-GERMANISM. 

One of the most interesting books in the library right 
now is Roland G. Usher's Pan-Germanism, which was 
published in February, 1912, almost two years ago. Pro- 
fessor Usher has so thorough an understanding of the 
world movements of the past, so comprehensive a view 
of every nation's movements and intentions, past and 
present, that he is able, with unerring judgment, to assort 
and adjust, with the result that he presents to the fasci- 
nated gaze of the reader a panorama of the world, mov- 
ing directly to the present crisis — and beyond. Where, 

Page Seventeen 



^fft College ^reeting£( 



we wonder, does he get his knowledge of the fundamental 
facts ? 

There is an article in the October Atlantic Monthly on 
'The Main Cause of the War," which he sent from Eu- 
rope six days before Europe declared war. 

Y. W. C. A. NOTES. 

In the past month we have had some splendid meet- 
ings. The trip through the "Ghetto" gave a splendid in- 
sight into the work to be done in our Mission Schools, The 
special music has been excellent and we appreciate the 
way the new girls respond. 

Saturday night, Oct. 1 8, the Y. W. C. A. carnival was 
given. It was a real gala occasion. Everyone came to 
dinner costumed and ready for some fun. Every type 
was represented, from the German wiener man down to 
the little boy in overalls. The first entertainment was a 
vaudeville show. "The Arcadian Tragedy" made a 
good beginning. "The Old Maids of Lee" were very 
clever and handsome, too. "The Sleeping Beauty," 
given by the Academy, was effective and the costumes 
worn by the ladies were very beautiful. "The Strong 
Man." made a hit by the skill evinced in climbing furni- 
ture. The "Die Company" was the specialty of the even- 
ing. Such wonderful speaking, singing and playing could 
be found in Germany alone and the carnival surely 
brought us this one pleasure at least. The friends who 
came to meet Mr. Alfalfa Hayseed when he called were 
good imitators. The amateur performance ranked well 
with the professionals, Mary and her Little Lamb sang 
some beautiful ballads. The Wiener Family have a splen- 
did way of carrying on their business, bringing them suc- 
cess however the wheel of fortune may turn. An unu- 
sual amount of laughter was caused by the Crying Baby 
and the touching way in which the "Mocking Bird" was 
rendered by the Humaphone. During the intermission, 

Page Eighteen 



I JJ Wbt CoUesc ^reetingj! 

tickets were sold for a drawing at the country store. Very 
valuable premiums were received, such as red pepper, 
chocolates, cinnamon sticks and all sorts of other good 
edibles donated by the merchants of Jacksonville. About 
nine o'clock the circus goers went to see the pike. The 
wonderful fortune teller, shooting gallery and crispette 
boy drew the people irresistibly. "Dr. Jekyl and Mr. 
H3'de" proved very fascinating, in spite of the blood- 
curdling sounds issuing from the door. "The Ride for 
Life" and the Midgets attracted great throngs. The more 
intellectual ones visited the Psychological Experts and 
learned the latest views on that subject. The Tango 
Ladies were very beautifully gowned and walked about 
with much grace. The lemonade, hamburger and stick 
candy were refreshing and caused the guests to part with 
their money readily. The Y. W. C. A. highly appreciates 
the support given and feels that a splendid year is be- 
fore it. 

The service Sunday, Oct. 19, on "Our Missions," 
with its notes from Geneva, was well worth while. We 
surely see the aim of the Association more clearly, that 
is, bringing about the brotherhood of man. The system- 
atic giving pledges were taken after the talk, when over 
$120 were pledged, nearly doubling last year's amount. 
Sixty dollars of this goes toward the support of a secre- 
tary in China and twenty dollars pays the scholarship of 
a Japanese girl in a school in Aoyama, a district of To- 
kyo, Japan. Letters are received at intervals from Fumi, 
our own little Japanese schoolgirl. 

Another line of Avork which the Association has been 
the means of bringing about is the Bible classes held in 
the Sunday schools. "Student Standards" is the subject 
of the interesting little book which the classes are using 
as a text, a subject which is of vital interest to every ear- 
nest college student. Mrs. R. A. Gates and Miss Hull have 
the classes at Grace and Centenary churches respectively. 
At each church a fine sized class has been organized. 

Page Nineteen 




tH^e CoSege Greetings; 




On Nov. 1 Miss Olmsted, the city visiting nurse, talked 
to the Association of the practical service which can be 
and is being done here in Jacksonville. She told us of 
the Morgan County Tubercular Clinic, her own work as 
visiting nurse, and the free open air school which is to be 
established. It is hoped that some of our own girls can 
be of service in connection with this work. On Novem- 
ber 2 a benefit concert is to be given by some of our fac- 
ulty and others in behalf of the city work. 

The Y. W. C. A. has been coming before the public 
eye in many ways recently. Thursday evening, Oct. 22, 
the college girls were invited to the Society Halls and the 
Academy girls to the reception room, where tea and wa- 
fers were served by the leaders of the Mission study 
classes for the following winter. The classes and leaders 
are : 'The Young Working Girl, " Miss Robinson ; "Wom- 
en of Five Nations," Ola Wendel; "Immigrant Forces," 
Alice Tombaugh; "Country Life," Barbara Weber and 
Helena Munson, and "Moslem Africa," Esther Fowler. 

A large volume, "Students and Worldwide Expansion 
of Christianity," a report of the Kansas City convention, 
1914, of the Student Volunteer Movement, is in the 
library. It is full of interesting and up-to-date problems 
and may be a great help to the girls in their work. 

FOUNDERS' DAY. 

On the program of Founders' Day before me is a pic- 
ture of that first building, which was completed in l85l. 
Those stately pillars are surely a symbol of a noble be- 
ginning. It is hard for us who are students today to im- 
agine what those years meant, but the more we come to 
know about them, the more we reverence the founder*: 
of our College. 

Because we love our College and are eager to know 
more of its noble foundations, Founders' Day is dear to 
us. Sixty-eight long years, but rather short years for col- 
Page Twenty 



Clie CoOtge Greetings: 



lege years are always short, stretch back of us. During 
this time many strong men have given their support to 
bringing about the materialization of a wonderful vision. 
On Thursday, Oct. 15, especial respect was paid to Archi- 
bald Clark Wadsworth, whose signature, as president of 
the board of trustees, is upon more than half of the total 
number of diplomas given in the history of the school. 
His picture was presented by Dr. T. J. Pitner, with words 
of appreciation of his service. An organ voluntary by 
Director Henry V. Stearns, a violin solo by Mrs. Day and 
a vocal duet by Miss Miller and Mrs. Hartmann increased 
the beauty of the service. 

In a short talk Dr. Harker pictured to us in a vivid 
way the College as it is to be, and told what equipment 
and endowment will be necessary to bring about such an 
ambition. The interesting address of the morning was 
made by Hon. Richard Yates, one of the trustees of the 
school. At the close of the service Dr. Harker read to us 
the quaint little diploma written in Latin which had been 
presented to Margaret Morrison on the very first Com- 
mencement day and is now given to us by her daughter, 
Miss Alice Turley, a member of the class of 1877. 

SENIORS. 

The Senior Class is glad to have Miss Mary Ander- 
son to continue as class officer. The following officers 
were elected at a recent business meeting: President, 
Winifred Burmeister; vice president, Helen Dinsmore; 
secretary and treasurer, Lucile Reinbach. 

With the dignity which caps and gowns always give, 
the Seniors made ther formal appearance in Chapel 
Thursday morning, Oct. 22. The processional was led by 
the Faculty, followed by the Seniors, who were escorted 
by the Sophomores. A special service consisted of the 
College song, the Class hymn, a vocal solo by Miss Miller 
and a short talk by Dr. Harker, closing with a recessional. 

Page Twenty-one 




Wbt CoUese ^xtttinz^ 




JUNIORS. 

The Junior Class has organized with Miss Jennie An- 
derson, class officer of our Freshman year, as our class 
officer again. We welcome her back to our class. 

Election results were: 

Edna Robb, president. 

Wilma Cox, vice-president. 

May Bigger, secretary and treasurer. 

The Juniors stirred up the Freshmen in a lively way 
on Monday evening, Oct. 19, when they entertained them 
at a "wake up" party in the Society Halls. During the 
general "mix up" dates were made for the "talk up" 
which followed. In the "sing up," the Juniors sang some 
of their new class songs and gave a fine demonstration of 
Junior pep. The classes were then very delightfully en- 
tertained in the "speak up" by readings given by Alma 
Harmel and Corinne Hughes. During the time allotted 
for the "eat up" light refreshments were served and a 
charming evening was brought to a close by the "let up." 

SOPHOMORE NOTES. 

The Sophomores are still here this month with their 
"pep," and will be all the rest of the month, too. We are 
very glad to welcome Miss McLaughlin as our class officer. 
We know that we will be livelier than ever, for surely she 
has "lots of pep" stored away with the rest of those ex- 
plosives. 

At a recent meeting the following officers were 
elected: 

President — Mary Harrison. 

Vice president — Johanna Onken. 

Secretary — Genevieve Dague. 

Treasurer — Pauline Herrmann. 

Representative on Athletic Staff — Wilma Miller. 

We started our share in athletics by challenging the 
Freshmen to a "hare and hound chase,' but rain pre- 

Page Twenty-two 



IS^ije CoHese ^reetingst 




vented our going. VVe are hoping for a bright Monday 
soon, when we may lead them a merry chase. 

FRESHMAN. 

The Freshmen as yet have no organization. They 
enthusiastically welcome Miss Hull as their class officer 
and look forward to a year in which the college will know 
that it has a Freshman class which does things. They 
have already given an evidence of their "pep" in the pic- 
nic which they held at Gravel Springs, Two hayrack 
loads of jolly laughing girls found the beauties of the 
woods in the Autumn on the jaunt. 

THETA SIGMA. 

The following officers have been elected to fill va- 
cancies: Critic, Helen McGhee; Chorister, May Bigger; 
Summoner, Alta Marie Miller; Chaplain, Alice Birch; 
Page, Gretchen Franken. 

Word has lately been received from our last year's 
Seniors. Geneva Upp has been elected superintendent 
of the city playgrounds of La Kota, North Dakota, and 
Clara Kelly is having splendid success in her teaching at 
Frederickstown, Missouri. 

Johnsie Rowfand is teaching music and art in the 
public schools of Olney, 111. 

^? 
LAMBDA MU. 

At our last meeting, Helen DeWitt was elected as our 
vice-president, to fill the vacancy left by Naomi Davis. 
Dorothy Pinkston takes Miss DeWitt's place as usher. 

On the evening of the twelfth the girls of the Society 
met for an informal party in the hall. We especially en- 
joyed exchanging news of our former members. Letters 
from various points on the coast tell us that Eloise Wil- 
liams is making a very extended tour of the west. 

Page Twenty-three 




tET^e CoUege ^ttttinqi 



BELLES LETTRES. 

The day was bright, 

The people few, 
When down the street 
Some vagabonds flew. 

With bright red turbans, sticks over our shoulders with 
suspicious-looking bundles dangling from the end, a shiny 
butcher knife and a string of tin cups, we started out from 
I. W. C. "We don't know where we're going, but we're 
on our way." Down the street, up shady lanes and dusty 
roads, across fields, over fences and up the railroad track 
we tramped until we came to an inviting-looking grove 
on a hill. Here we decided to build our fire. Buns, fried 
eggs and bacon never tasted so good before, especially 
"topped off" with sure enough peaches and cream. The 
vagabond party was carried out in a vagabond program 
the following Tuesday. "Experiences With Vagabonds," 
"How 1 Became a Wanderer," "The Time, the Place, the 
Tramp," a poem, and the "Dagos" certainly showed ex- 
perience in such lines. 

The next week a program on "October Leaves" was 
given. All sorts of leaves were represented — Autumn 
leaves, a leave of obsence, and even leaving Europe and 
Lake Matanzas. Miss Florence Taylor gave an interest- 
ing talk on her experiences in Europe last summer. 

During the last month we had two of our old mem- 
bers back with us, Hallie Clem and Marjorie Becker. 

S» 

PHI NU. 

For our work this year a course in the American 
Novel, beginning with Poe, has been arranged and prom- 
ises interesting and profitable programs. 

The annual Phi Nu banquet will be held, as usual, 
at Colonial Inn on November 28. 

On the third Thursday of each month, at 4:15, a 
"cozy" will be held in the hall. Town and out of town 
alumnae will be especially welcome. 

Page Twenty- four 



^!)c College (Greetings! 




ART NOTES. 

Sarah May was the fortunate winner of five prizes at 
the recent Western Montana State Fair. The prizes were 
awarded to some water color studies and china done in the 
studio last year. 

"Have you a vacant hour this afternoon? " 

"Yes." 

"Then won't you come up to the studio and pose for 
the sketch class? " 

At this the girl who has had this sudden and unex- 
pected question thrust at her, blushes and looks horrified 
at the idea. Visions of sitting still for a whole hour, and 
real artists gazing at her, whirl through her head, and she 
tries to make all manner of excuses. But with a little 
persuasion she promises to come, and the girls are de- 
lighted with their model. 

The Sketch class is proving very interesting this year. 
Last month Mary Fowler, Julius Stucky, Mildred Barton, 
Beulah Erixson, Helen Mathis, Sarah May, Helena Mun- 
son and Helen Harper posed for the Friday afternoon 
classes. D. S. Stevens. 

EXPRESSION NOTES. 

There is a program given by the Literary Analysis 
class on Friday and Saturday mornings at 10:30. Any- 
one interested is especially invited to attend these classes 
and is welcome to any of the other classes. 

Miss Gleckler, director of the department, gave a 
very entertaining program at Astoria Wednesday even- 
ing, Oct. 14. 

^? 

THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC. 

The College of Music is looking forward to a very 
prosperous year, with a large enrollmeni and an enthu- 
siastic faculty. A number of last year's faculty are still 



Page Twenty-five 




tE^f^t CoUese #reetmgK 




connected with the school and the new members are 
rapidly getting adjusted to their duties. 

Among the most important additions to the faculty 
is Mrs. Rosalind M. Day, instructor in violin. Mrs. Day 
has had the advantage of wide experience as a teacher, 
and instruction under the best masters on this side of the 
ocean, as well as some of the greatest teachers of violin 
that Europe boasts, including among them Cesar Thomp- 
son, the Belgian teacher, and Leopold von Auer, of Petro- 
grad, the teacher of Mischa Elman and Zimbalist. An 
orchestra has been formed under Mr. Stearns' direction 
which already numbers over twenty ambitious performers. 
They are hard at worl^ on a progam which they hope to 
give before long. 

Arrangements have been completed for the purchase 
of a Victrola, which will be used extensively in lecture 
work. Negotiations are under way which will lead, it is 
hoped, to the formation of a mandolin and guitar orches- 
tra, and in a short time the Madrigal Club and a large 
chorus, to include any in the school and College who may 
wish to join, v/ill be organized. The College of Music was 
well represented on Founders' Day with organ solos by 
Mr. Stearns, a violin solo by Mrs. Day and a duet by Miss 
Miller and Mrs. Hartmann. In the very near future the 
Artists' course, the Faculty recitals and the Sunday after- 
noon Vesper concerts will begin. 

INDIANA CLUB. 

Did some one say Indiana Club? Well, I guess yes, 
and before the year is over you will sit up and take notice 
of these fine representatives from Indiana. You will mar- 
vel at their support of every organization in the College 
and their interest in each other. 

Our officers are as follows: Mary Harrison, presi- 
dent; Edna Babcock, vice-president; Grace Heller, secre- 
tary; Pauline Herrmann, treasurer; Helen Uhl, reporter. 



Page Twenty-six 




Wfit CoOege (greeting^ 



^^ 



With our twenty-eight members to boost, the Hoosier 
Club is bound to do things. 

We had planned a picnic for Saturday, October 10, but 
disagreeable weather prevented our going. All we need 
is a little external sunshine. We have plenty internally. 

THE EGYPTIAN CLUB. 

The idea of forming a club of the girls who live in 
that part of Illinois commonly known as Egypt has been 
suggested and met with enthusiasm. Announcement of 
a meeting for organization will be made soon, and it is 
hoped that every "Egyptian" will show her loyalty and 
"pep" by giving this movement her hearty support. 

THE COLLEGE SING. 
On the night of Sept. 26, the third big college Sing 
came off in a blaze of triumph. The week preceding the 
event was an exciting one for all concerned — for the old 
girls preparing the exquisite lyrics to be rendered — and 
for the new uninitiated ones who accasionally overheard 
such a remark as "green blood" or"It certainly is foxy." 
After dinner the entire student body congregated in two 
society halls thrown together for the evening. Before 
people were fairly in their seats the irrepressible sopho- 
mores — that doughty class of whom you may read further 
in this number of the Greetings — burst upon the scene in 
a peppery song seasoned with ginger. At any rate it 
served to warm folks up and make them want to "lift up 
their voices and burst into song." After the opening 
number "We're Coming," they were all given a chance 
to vocalize on "U-Rah-Rah," and everyone joined in. No 
one could beg off because they didn't know the words, for 
we installed this night our new song book, compiled and 
written by ourselves. It contains just the old songs that 
are prime favorites and several new songs lately written. 
In addition to these good points, we had a number of 

Page Twenty-seven 




tE^i}t CoUese <§reetinss( 




blank pages put in on which to record such songs as our 
students may be inspired to write for various occasions. 
It really is an indespensible little gray book and they sold 
like fresh crispettes. 

If the French language was composed entirely of 
nasals we should all be most proficient, as our rendering 
of "The Typical Tune of Jacksonville" indicated. As we 
look back on that ballad, was it not melodious? Without 
the mel — perhaps. Another feature song was called "A 
Freshman Tragedy" sung gustily by seniors, juniors and 
sophomores. The poor freshies quaked in their shoes the 
rest of the evening. There was also an "Elegy on the 
Faculty" which we are sure must have been appreciated. 
This Sing, the second Saturday night after the opening of 
college, is one of the star events — in fact it is "one of the 
best things we do." How do we do it? To borrow the 
senior chant: 

"We do it all by proxy, by proxy, by proxy — 

We let the sophs and freshmen represent us don't you 

see, 

We think that it is foxy, it certainly is foxy, 

The other people do the work — 

But the credit comes to me." 



ALUMNAE NOTES. 

Zola Stum visited with friends at I. W. C. on the 2 3rd 
and 24th of September. 

Mrs. Nina Turner Green, who was a graduate of the 
'09 class, also visited 1. W. C. in the past month. 

Mrs. Annette Rearick Lohman is the proud mother of 
a baby girl. Mrs. Lohman graduated in 1912. 

Sunday morning Dr. Marker received word from his 
daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth Marker Riddell, that he had an- 
other grandson, Richard Roulfe. 

Page Twenty- eight 




^^e CoUege Greetings! 




An item overlooked last month was the marriage of 
Helen Ryan to Sterry Long on Aug. 4 They are now liv- 
ing at Parma, Idaho. 

Ella Newman, a graduate of the Domestic Science 
department, is now head of the department in Jackson- 
ville. We all wish Miss Newman success for the coming 
year. 

Bess Brecken is at her home in Jacksonville again 
this fall. 

>»» 
WHAT ABOUT THE ANNUAL? 

From other college papers we see that other schools 
have their annual boards appointed and at work. Where 
is ours? What are the Juniors going to do about an an- 
nual ? During these early weeks and months of school 
much is happening which is not being made use of in the 
should-be ever ready note-books of the annual editors. 
The Juniors better get busy if they are alive to the 
situation. 

Last year the Annual proved a profitable undertaking, 
not only in a financial way, but to the student body, as a 
book of extreme interest. It was received v/ith such en- 
thusiasm that there should be no hesitancy about the suc- 
cess of one for this year. The Seniors and Sophomores 
and even some of the Freshmen are already clamoring 
for one. A rumor is abroad to the effect that if the 
Juniors don't give us one, the Sophomores are standing 
ready to take the matter into their hands and push it with 
their renowned vigor. Will you allow this. Juniors i" 

-£? 
HIKE CLUBS. 

During the last month five hike clubs were formed, 
one of which is made up of faculty members. Most of 
the girls have been put on one of the clubs. We may well 
be proud of the fact that through these clubs we, as Col- 
lege women, come to be able to walk long distances with- 

Page Twenty-nine 



^f}t College ^vntin^si 




out fatigue. Not only as physical exercise is walking a 
pleasure, but in this way as in no other we may learn the 
beauties of the out of doors. 

EXCHANGES. 

Our exchanges this month have not been very nu- 
merous, but it has been interesting to note how other 
schools have been "buckling down to business," too. 

The Illinois Wesleyan Argus has some interesting ac- 
counts of experiences in the war zone. 

The Hedding Graphic might be improved by a story 
or two. College activities seem to take up all the space. 

The Quassui Quarterly was the object of a great deal 
of interest. We need to come in touch with the v/ork 
done in other lands in order to realize hoM-^ high a standard 
they hold. 

MUST ATTEND CHAPEL. 

Brown University, Providence, R. 1., will return this 
fall to the plan of a strictly enforced daily chapel attend- 
ance. Attendance at the daily college religious service has 
for some time been voluntary at this institution, chiefly in 
consideration for the Roman Catholic and Jewish students 
who are found at the university in large numbers. The 
results have been unfavorable, and as the chapel services 
are undenominational, all students will henceforth be re- 
quired to attend. A new department for religious educa- 
tion has been established at Brown and the authorities are 
planning in a very definite way to promote the spiritual 
life of the student body and the faculty. 



Page Thirty 



ijiiiiiiiitiiiiiimiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiMimiiiiiiiniii iiiimiiiiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiii| 

I GARMENTS FOR YOUNG WOMEN! | 

I Tht' nt^west aiul most p(>]»ular iashiciis ni tht- '\-\.y | 

I reach our show room iir.st--strai^ht from the work- | 

I rooms of the New York workers. Attractive stvles, I 

for the young- women, especially, are shown here in | 

profusion. | 



Coats 
Waists 



Suits 

Skirts 



Dresses 
Lingerie 



LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 




COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

Largfe assortment of footwear 
for every occasion. 

Dress, Street and Bed-room 
Footwear 

h: o z^ 1=^ IE K. s' 

We Repair Shoes 



I J. A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OI!I:R?:;;vER 



i THE COLLEGE STORE | 

j Pennants. Stationery, Tennis Goods, Dru;Li's. School | 

i Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory | 

I Books and Photo Albums | 

i * 'PLEASED customers" — OUR MOTTO I 

I Goods Delivered | 

i Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St. and Square I 
iMiniiinniiUiMiP ''■'''■''''■■''"■■■'"'"MiiiiiiMiMiiiiiinnniuminniiiiMiiiHMiiMiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiMiKMiiMiniiiiinHinMnnniiiiiiiinniJMiiiiMirHinMiiiiiiniininMriiii^ 



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Otto Speith 

1bome K^ortratture 



Our Home Portraiture won the vSilver Medal this j-ear at the 
Peoria State Convention 



349 East State Street 



Studio: Southwest Corner Square 



I SEE 

I Bofiaosinga 

3 

I For Fancy Fruit and 

I Confectionery 

i 

I 72 East Side Square 



i COTRELL & LEONARD 



ALBANY, N. Y. 




MAKERS OP 
CAPS 

GOWNS and 
HOODS 



I To the American Colleges' and Uniyer- 
I sities from the Atlantic^ to the Facific 
I Class contrarts 3 specialty: 



"The Home of the Crispette" 

The Sanitary Pop-corn 
and Crispette Shop 

Pop^corn that melts in your mouth 
Roasted and 5alted Peanuts 

East State Street 



WE SELL SERVICE! 

We do not ruu an ordinary type-setting 
plant — 

We leave that to the Other Fellow. 
When you have a job that requires 
quick action, send it to the only 
modern equipped shop in the city. 
Modern Machinery and the Ability to Use It 

The Roach Press 

^08 HmsL Stiite Su-ftri 



FLORETH CO. 

Leaders in Millinery, Coats, 

Suit:-^ anu ail your Dry 

Go>'ds needs 

Alway.s lowest possible prices 
don't forget us 



Coover& Shreve 

Have a cianplete line of 

Dmi^'S. Kodaivs. P^Tfiini'jN. 
Stationery and HolidLiy Gift;- 

We do Developing" & Printing 
East and West Side Square 



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1 Latest in JEWELRY, 




i CUT GLASS and 


Mai his, Kamm & Shibe say 


1 SILVERWARE 


We can furnish vour 


[ AT 


Shoes and Party Slippers 


1 Russell & Lyon's 


in the popular styles, 


1 Oldest Established Jewelers 


leathers, and 


1 in Central Illinois 


fabrics 


Both Phones 96 

i 





PHOTOGRAPHER 



Member State and National Associations 



McCULIvOUGH STUDIO 



EAST SIDE SQUARE 



Seraphina — "Aren't you a Freshmore?" 
Prep. — "Oh, I'm so happy!" 
Soph. — "What's happened?" 

Prep. — "I've just decided whom I'm going to have 
for my case." 



(§rapi)ic 
Concern 



^rinterfi, ^ubUsifjerg, Stationers; 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



WIUIHUUIIIIIIUIIIIUUIlUWIIUUIIIIIIIIIIUUIIIIIIIItUIUMIIIIIIIIIHIIIIUHIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIHIIIHIIIIUIIIIUIIHIIIIIIIIimlHIIIUIIIUUUWIIHIIUUUIIIIUIIUIIIIIIU 



dfiiiliiiiimiiiiiiiHiiiiiitiiMiiiiiiiiiuMiiitiuriiniiiiiiiMtiiiiiiiiiiiinrmniuiii!MiHiiiininiiiiimiHiiiiiHHiiiHiiiiininiiiiininisnri:ni:Hi!Hii!!tHn!iiiiitMi:ii!i:nini^ 

I For those who discriminate 

I We simply suggest tliat it has been our coiistr.!it effort to 

I please the studeuts who come to our city. We sciect oo.ly the 

I best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. 

I Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 

I Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

I Telephone 227. Al! packages delivered. We cater for all 

I College functions. 

I Vickery 5l Merrigan 



OAXERERS 



227 W. State St. 



IBoth Phones 309 

I SAFEST PLACE TO TRADE 

IfjlLLERBY'^ 

I DRY GOODS STORE 



West Side Square 



Brady Bros. 

Kverything- in Hardware, 
House-furnishing-s and Painti 

45-47 South Side Square 



Miss M. — "Mary has a coat of many colors, like Jo- 
seph's. 

M. N. — "Joseph who?" 



C* Y. Frankcnberg 


Established 1890 


Ladies' and Gents' Tailoring 


^J^/a K 


Cleaning, Altering, 
Repairing 

Improved Machinery, 


CJ.OAKS. S "']^^^^^^^^'"-'-''^^^ 
- '''^^'^ Jacksonville, fjuu 


Best Work 


Low Prices Square Dealing 


215 East State Street 


Keep us busy 



•IIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHUIIIHIIIIIIHIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIUIIIIII 



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nDuUenu & Ibamilton 

Confectioners 



CLEANLINESS 



SERVICE 



QUALITY 

Creams, Ices, Frappes, Sundaes, Sodas, Parfaiis, 

Mousses and all Hot Drinks 

Home-made Candies and Salted Nuts 

The Store of Merit 

Phones 70 216 East State Street 



Why pay more for no more? 

Let us sell you SHOES 

It means more spending money 
for you 

We cater to your wants 

A. SMITH 

The Popular Price East State Street 
Shoe Man 

WE REPAIR SHOES 



I. M. BUNCE & Co. I 



211 East Morgan Street 



Miss M., at Wednesday night talk — "When the Senior 
rises, it is customary for the girls at the table to stand back 
and let it pass." 



IHARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

I Designs, Cut Flowers, 
I Plants 

I Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 
Store: Bell Phone 154, 111, 182 
Greenhouses, Bell 775 



McGINNIS' j 

The Youngf Ladies' Shoe Store 1 

We carry a full line of Evening Slippersf 
in all colors. I 

i 

If it's new, we have it | 



JAS. McGINNIS & CO.j 

Bast Side Square | 

E 

■MimnilWIIIItnlllllllllllinimilHnMtlllltllllllllllMmilllHIIIIIMIIHIHIIIiniHIIIIIIMIIItlllHIIIHttHIIHIIIIIUIIIIIHIIIUHUIlllUIIIIIIHIIIIIWIUIIIIIIIIWIIIHH 



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I 



Want 

Cut flowers 



F 
E 
R 

N 



FROM 



JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

Both Phones 



s 

I You will find a complete line of 

I FANCY GROCERIES 



at 



I Walker's Grocery 

I Home Cookingf a Specialty 
I 

I 

I Both Phones 205 E. Morgan Street 



Job Printing 

Of All Kinds 

John K* Long 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 



213 West Morgan Street 
Illinois Phone 400 



Miss M. to A. M. G. — "Go into the next room and 
when there are three or four of you, let me know." 



I Dorwart Market 

I ALL, KINDS OF 

|fRESH and SALT MEATS 
I FISH, POULTRY, Krc. 

3 

X 

|Both phones 196 230 W. State St. 

^iHmiiniiiiiiiiMiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiitiiniiiiiiiiiiiiii 



KODAK FINISHING 

Vulcan Roll Films 

Cameras from $2.00 up 
Everything strictly first class 

Vail & Vail 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. 

IIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIMMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHMIIIIIIHIMIIIimimi 



iiiiiiiiiiMiiiHiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiMiiiiiiiiMiiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiMHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniMiMiiiiMiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiniii£ 

THE STATIONERY STORE THAT SERVES I 



OUR Morro; 

Service and 

Satisfaction 



OUR MOTTO: 

Service and 

Satisfaction 



Headquarters for 

STATIONERY, POST CARDS, BOOKS, MAGAZINES, 
PENNANTS, NOVELTIES, CAMERAS AND 

PHOTO SUPPLIES 
LEATHER GOODS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

Table Runners, Matts, Cushions and Piano Scarfs 

Expert Developing and Finishing 

Open Days and Nights until 9:00 P. M. 

Illinois Phone 450 

59 Southeast Corner Square Jacksonville, Illinois 



Miss H. — "What kinds of minerals do we expect to 
find in igneous rock ? ' 

M. L. P.— "Steel mines." 



Cate 

Hn^ annex for XaMes 

221-223 Hast State Street 
Illinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Art Needle Work 
and Millinery 

211 West state Street 



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Phonbs 800 

ROBERTS BROS. 

DRUGS AND QROCERIES 

We guarantee e\'ery purchase 

and deliver}' or mone}' 

back 

ROBERTS BROS. 

29 South Side Square Phones 800 



S. S Kresixe Co 

5c & IOC Store 

A popular place for Colleg-e 
Girls 



The Store tor 



I DRESS GOODS and SILKS 



^ ^^^gm^ 



DRY GOODS STORE 



Kodak Shop 



A. H. Atherton & Son 



Under Farrell's Rank 



We Develop and Print Promptly 



A. B.— "I heard one of the teachers say that goldenrod 



full of maderia germs." 



Freshman, in Coliege Alge'nrp. — "Ho\v do you spell 
p sub one? " 



I E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

I Proprietor of 

I City Steam Dyk Works 

I Dry Cleaning rif FMUi.y 

I Waists and Dresses 

I a Specialt}' 

I 230 East State St. Jacksonville, 111. 



I Illinois Phone 388 

^iniiiiiiimmimi' »iiiiiiiiiii>ii..ii,|iiiii, „„„„ MiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiniiiiiiMiii iiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiii iim iiii 



ideal Bread 

is bttter 
so are the Cakes 



SliiiiiiiiiiiHiininiiiMiiiiiMiiiiMiiirMniiiiiiMiiMuiniinMiiinniiiiiiinMiNiMiMiMiiMniiiiiniiiiniMMiinniMiiiiiiiiiiMinMMiiuiiMiiiMMniMnHinriniiuniiiiMnMiiniiiiiMii^ 

I Visit I 

I SCHRAM'S I 

I Jewelry Store | 

I We have good-lookinj^ and good-wearing goods | 

I Will be pleased to show them | 



All the Faculty, Students and Friends 
of the Colletre should have a Checking 
or Savings Account with 

F. G. FARRELL & GO. 

BANKERS 

F. E. F'arrell, President 

E. E- Crabtree, Vice-President 

H. H. Potter, Cashier 

M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier 




AYLOR'S J 

Grocery | 



A g^ood place Id trade 



221 West State Street 



Freshman — "How long have those Anderson sisters 
been here? " 

Upper Classman — "What Anderson sisters? " 
Freshman — "Why, Miss Mary and Miss Jennie," 



College Printing- SpecfaHsts 

Year Books College Calendars 

Every Kind of Printing and Binding 

VVRJTE us 

Pantagraph Printing and Stationery Co* 

BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS 



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<iHiHiiiuiiniiMiiiiiiHiiMniiiiiinniiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiim«iiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiMiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinHniiiiiiiiiiiniiiini^ 



The I^atest in 

College Jewelry, Society 

Stationery, Bracelet 

Watches, Silver and 

Cut Glass 

AT 

BASSETT'S 

21 South Side Square 



C. J. Deppe & Co. I 

Known for "Ready-to- | 

wear" and Popular | 

Priced Dry Goods I 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 



HERE TO PI.EASE 




BROTHEDi: 



Candies 
Cookies 
Sandwiches 
Groceries 



Cakes 

Pies 

Pop on Ice 

California Fruits 



School Suppiies 



Jacksonville's foremost Store for Men 
and Specialties for Women 

Mannish Sweaters 

Mackinaw Coats, KnittedToques 

Mannish Rain Coats and Hats 

Trunks and Handbags 



Mollenbrock & McCulIough 



SUCCESSORS TO 



McDougairs Studio 



234i West State Street 



Illinois Phone 808 



Ladies* Late Style Furs 



ARE SOLD BY 



Frank Byrns ^^* 



Store 



SiHiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiuiuiuiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Cherry's Livery | 

Finest Light and Heavy! 

Livery | 

Lowest Rates | 

235-237, 302-304-306 North Main Stieet| 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIH IIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIH^ 



^>nt!tiiiiriii!iiiiiiitii[riiiiiiiii!MfiiiiiiiriiiiMii!iiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit iiiriiii iiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiJiiiiiiiMriiiiiitiiiriiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiijiitiiiHiiiiiiiiiiriiiiii:. 



Cafe 



Confectionary 



||^€-EwOC 



ill 



Ca.tering' 



Soda 



Len G, Magill 



Printer 



I East State Street 111. Phone 418 



Candies i 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



F. H. in mass meeting — "Thiink tlie matter over and 
decide if we want to organize ourselves into a constitu- 
tion." 



SHEET MUSIC, MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 

TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 

AND SUPPLIES 



I 19 SOUTH SIDE PUBWC SQUARB | 

^iiiiHiniiiiiiiiiiiiniMMiinuuHiHiiiiniMiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiMiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiniMiMiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiim^ 



for the home 



ANDRE & ANDRE 



for the home 



STUDENTS 

Headquarters for Room Furnishings 

The Best Goods at the Price, no matter what the Price 

ANDRE & ANDRE 



THE GIFT 
STORE 



THE GIFT 
STORE 



|Dr. AivByn Lincoln Adams 
I OCCULIST AND AURIST 

i to the State School for the Blind 

s 

c 

I 323 West State Street 

3 

a 

I Practice limited to diseases of the 

s 

£ Kve, Ear, Nose and Throat 

s 
s 

i Both Telephones 



FOR YOUR DEN 5 

Beautiful College Pennants 

YAI.E AND HARVARD 
Each gin. x 24in. 

PRINCETON, CORNEIvE, 
MICHIGAN 
Each 7in. x 2iin. 

4— PENNANTS, Size 12x30—4 

Any Leading Colleges of 

Your Selection 

All of our best quality, in their 
proper colore, with colored emblems. 

Either assortment, for limited time, 
sent postpaid for 50 cents and five 
stamps to cover shipping costs. 

Write us for prices before placing 
orders for felt novelties of all kinds. 

The Gem City Novelty Co. 



DR. ALPHA B. APPLEBEEf 

3 

Dentist | 

326 West State St. I 



We will pipe your house for | 

GAS I 

or wire it for | 

ELECTRICITY | 

at cost I 

Jacksonville l^ailway & i 

Light Company I 

Two years to pay 224 S. Main St. 3 



DR. A. C. KINGSLEY 

DENTIST 

409 Ayers National Bank Bldg. 

Both Phones 760 



I 2420 Bittner Street 

I Dayton, Ohio 

Tiiiiiiiiiiiii iintiiiiiiKiiiiiiMiiii iiiiiiiH iiiiiiiiiini MiiiiiiiiiiiiiiA iiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini; 



iniiriiiiiiiiNiiiiimimiiiiiiiiimiliiiniimmmiiiiiiiliinillMiiiiMlMliiiiliiiiiiiiiMlitiiMliiiiiiiiiiiniiniiniriiiHMiiiniiiMiniMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir iiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiii^ 

COLLEGE GIRLS: | 

3 

See our Motor Coats, Mackinaws and Sweaters | 

Also Ladies' Holeproof Hosiery | 

LUKEMAN BROTHERS I 



Girls^ Patronize Our Advertisers | 

i 



Ayers National Bank 

Founded 1852 



Capital 
$200,000 

Surplus 
$^0,000 

Deposits 
^2,000,000 




United States | 

Depository I 

Postal Savings | 

Deposiiory I 

Member of | 

Federal | 

Reserve Bank i 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
Special Window for Ladies 
Ladies' Waiting- Room 
We make a feature of Ladies' Accounts, and have 
provided facilities for their exclusive use 

OFFICERS 



M. F. Dunlap, President 
Andrew Russel, Vice President 
R. M. Hockenhull, Vice President 
Chas. B. Graff, Vice President 
H. J. Rodgers, Vice President 



O. F. Buffe, Cashier 
R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 
H. C. Clement, Asst Cashier 
\V. G. Goebel, Asst. Cashier 
H. K. Chenoweth, Asst. Cashier 



Owen P. Thompson 
Fdward F. Goltra 
John W. I^each 



Arthur Vannier, Assistant Cashier 
DIRECTORS 

George Deitrick Harry M. Capps 

R. M. Hockenhull O. F. Baffe 

M. F. Dunlap Andrew Russel 



uinitiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiMiiuiiHiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniHiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHii 



■4y?''' f 4- ; 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS 



OMAN'S COLLEG 



College of LiberalArts 
College of Music 
School of Fine Arts 
School of Expression 
School of Home Economics 

A Standard College — 
Regular college and academy courses 
leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 
inently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located 
in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 
dignified, old college town, noted for 
its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking for a good college. 

Call or address, Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, 111. 




•IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIHUIIIHIIUIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIHIIIIilllllMIHIHimWIIHIIIItlllllNUIHIIIIIIIIIHIIIIHIIIIHIIIWIWHHHIIWmiHIIIIIIIII 



tKije College Greetings 

<[f The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
^ Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the fifteenth of each month. 

tjl Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
fjf Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 

Contents 

Dr. Horace Reed-A Tribute 2 

Editorial . . 3 

Dr Barker's Chapel Talk 4 

Adoption of The Constitution 5 

Tommy Pumpkin's Thanksgiving 7 

Karly November Morning *'.... 8 

Ruined New Idea 9 

Halloween Party 11 

Circus Day 11 

Starting for Dreamland 12 

Matriculation in German Schools 15 

Athletic Association 16 

Y.W.C.A. Notes 17 

Alumnae 18 

Society 20 

Locals 21 

Expression Notes 23 

Home Economics 24 

Art Notes 24 

Missiouri Club 25 

Endowment Gifts 25 

No Annual This Year 26 

Thb 
Graphic Akts 

COKCBKK 




REV. HORACE REED, 
D. D., L. L. D. 





From life to life eternal Dr. Horace Reed, one of 
the most disting-uished and most widely known 
ministers of the Methodist Episcopal Church, pass- 
ed at noon on Sunday November the fifteenth. 

In 1895 Dr. Reed was named a trustee of Illinois 
Woman's Colleg^e and for nearly twenty years he 
was intimately associated with its administration. 
He rejoiced in its progress and was watchful for 
opportunity in finding- friends who would aid in its 
advancement. 

As a minister and leader in church activities Dr. 
Reed served as pastor of many larg-e churches in 
the conference, and in the cities where his work 
was appointed he never failed to manifest a breadth 
of intrest that extended beyond the bounds of his 
parish and enlisted his service in all that pertained 
to the welfare of the community life. 

During the recent session of Illinois Conference 
at Shelbyville Dr. Reed in compliance with an invita- 
tion extended to him celebrated his golden anniver- 
sary in the ranks of the ministry by preaching a 
special sermon, which was given with the power 
and vigor characteristic of his discourse. And thus, 
with a well rounded life of nearly seventy four 
years, his course has been run and from his co-labor- 
ers and from the Lord whom he served he receives 
the"Well done"of his finished course. 



ZCbe College (3reetinQ6 

Vol. XVIII Jackionrille, 111,, December, 1914 No. 3. 

Faculty Advisor — Miss Mary Anderson. 

Editor-in-Chik*^ — Helena Munson. 

Associate and Alumnae Editor — Winifred Burmeister. 

Assistant Editors — Helen McGhee, Elaine Buhrman. 

Business Manager — Audrey Berryman, 

Assistant Business Managers — Alma Harmel, Mary Harrison. 



EDITORIAL. 

During the last month events have rapidly taken place 
which will go down in the records of the college. We 
have been pushing forward to a fuller college life with 
rapid strides. The length and meaning of these strides 
no one can fully realize. The withdrawal of the charter 
of the College Council, the granting of a charter to the 
Student's Association, and the adoption of the constitu- 
tion of the new association have rapidly followed one 
after the other. 

The formation of this largest of all organizations, 
made possible by the earnest endeavor of the trustees and 
faculty to co-operate v/ith the students for the highest de- 
velopment of all, gives us opportunity to stretch out and 
develop to an untold extent. It means a bigger college 
and, above all, bigger students. However, in our en- 
thusiasm for doing things, we must not forget the big prin- 
ciple of co-operation. The granting of this charter to us 
does not mean that we have been given the right to "run 
things." We cannot succeed if we take this attitude and 
try to work against the faculty. Only when we realize 
that because of their sympathy with us and their desire to 
co-operate with us did the faclulty make this possible for 
us, will we be able to accomplish the bigger things. 
Therefore, let us take co-operation as our watchword! 

Page Three 




Wi)t College #reettnss( 



PRESIDENT MARKER'S CHAPEL ADDRESS. 

A year and a half ago, March 5, 1913, it was my 
pleasure and privilege to inaugurate Student Government 
in the College by the organization of the College Council. 
I regarded that as one of the most important events of my 
entire college administration. It was my joy to see that 
it was also appreciated by both faculty and students. 

An Editorial in the College Greetings at the time ex- 
pressed so clearly the spirit of both faculty and students, 
that I cannot do better than quote it at length: 

"College spirit has been the goal for which we have 
striven for several years, but not until we as a student body 
could sacrifice something, could do something bigger than 
we had yet done, something that made us forget self for 
the time, did the college spirit come. The interest and 
feeling of the past month when we have been giving all 
our thoughts and time to endowment has brought us all 
to a clearer realization of our latent loyalty. Our ideals 
must now be to keep the current of our enthusiasm in the 
right direction. The loyalty and enthusiasm we have 
shown for endowment, a temporary interest, must now be 
shown for the College as a college." 

Nothing has given me more pleasure and more hope 
for the future or the College than the increasing loyalty 
all the students have shown in everything pertaining to 
college advancement. You have shown yourselves eager 
and yet thoughtful to share in college responsibilities and 
keenly alert to the higher college interests and to college 
honor. 

It is therefore a delight to me to say this morning that 
the experiment in student government, begun by the or- 
ganization of the College Council, has fully met our ex- 
pectations. You have shown yourselves worthy of the 
confidence reposed in you. 

The College Council has done its work well and has 
advanced every interest for which it was organized. Es- 
pecially it has unified all college activities, it has promoted 

Page Four. 



Ci)e Collese ^nttinzi 



college spirit, it has conserved college loyalty and enthu- 
siasm, and it has stood for the highest ideals of honor and 
true womanliness. Under its guidance a still better or- 
ganization has been worked out, and at its suggestion, I 
now have the honor to present to you a charter for a Stu- 
dents' Association, and as soon as the new association is 
formed and the officers elected and installed, the College 
Council, having finished its work, its charter will be with- 
drawn at its own request and it will cease to be. 

The following. resolution was unanimously adopted by 
the College Council at a meeting held October 29th: 

"In view of the fact that a Students' Association is 
about to be organized, with power to control all student 
activities, the Council feels that the work for which it was 
organized can be carried on much more efficiently by the 
proposed organization. The Council heartily endorses 
this larger movement, and would suggest to President 
Harker that, with the installation of the officers of the 
new association, the work of the Council be considered 
complete, and that the charter granted to it be with- 
drawn." 

(Signed) Alma B. Weber. 

Secy. Pro tem. 

I regard the granting of this charter as one of the 
crowning acts of my administration as President and this 
day, October 30th, 1914, as one of the red letter days in 
the history of the College. 1 congratulate the entire body 
of students on the honor conferred upon them by trustees 
and faculty in the granting of this new charter, and confi- 
dently believe that you will exercise your new powers and 
duties with womanly thoughtfulness and with increasing 
ability. 

THE ADOPTION OF THE CONSTITUTION OF THE 
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION. 

On Thursday morning, Nov. 12, 1914, a mass meet- 
ing was held which is one to be remembered. At this 

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meeting the constitution and by laws of the Students' As- 
sociation were read. Article by article it was adopted 
with few objections, which showed good hard work by the 
constitution committee, which consisted of Peril Hess, 
Helen Dinsmore, May Bigger and Ruth Want, assisted by 
the Faculty Student Government committee made up of 
Miss Mothershead, Miss Neville, and Miss Jennie Ander- 
son. The constitution has been under way practically all 
fall and great care was taken to make it cover our par- 
ticular needs. 

This formation of ourselves into an organized body is 
really a wonderful sign of our awakening latent ability. 
Nothing that has ever been done by us as students has had 
such deep, sincere significance as this organization. It 
gives to our college life a new purpose and deeper mean- 
ing. To be a success it must mean that we as students 
are united by a feeling of "altogetherness" that goes over 
and beyond the bonds of class or society. Let it never be 
said of us, "Yes, they have a Students' Association, but it 
isn't a success." We of the middle west are criticised for 
indifference of action and opinion. Every man cannot 
light the fuse of the cannon, but dozens can carry ammu- 
nition to be shot off. Apply the figure to yourself and re- 
port for duty. 

We are indebted to the trustees, the President, and the 
faculty for our liberal charter. With sincerity of purpose 
and loyalty to the College, we pledge ourselves to prove 
that we are worthy of the rights granted us therein. 

On November 19th and 20th the following officers of 
the executive board were elected by the entire student 
body as the constitution of the Students' Association re- 
quires : 

President — Peril Hess. 

Vice-President — Audrey Berryman. 

Secretary — Ruth Harper. 

Treasurer — Ruth Want. 



Page Six 




tKJje CoUege (^reetinss! 




TOMMY PUMPKIN'S THANKSGIVING. 




A happy family of pumpkins lived in one of the many 
shocks of corn that dotted Farmer Brown's fields. How- 
ever, they were not to live there always, for one day about, 
two weeks before Thanksgiving Farmer Brown and his 
hired men drove into the fields and loaded this family with 
all of their neighbors into huge wagons. While many 
were taken to town and sold, this family and a few rela- 
tives were placed in the spacious cellar of the farm house. 

Father and Mother Pumpkin with all the aunts and 
uncles were the first to be laid on the floor, then came the 
cousins and the children and on the very top was little 
Tommy Pumpkin. They were not as comfortable as 
they had been in the corn shock, but they soon became ac- 
customed to their new surroundings and were quite happy. 
The conversation among the apples and nuts was par- 
ticularly interesting to them. It was all about Thanks- 
giving. "What does Thanksgiving mean?" they asked 
eagerly and although the apples and nuts tried to explain 
to them, all the information they could obtain was a very 
confused jumble of ideas about company, turkeys, pies, 
cranberries, cakes and good times. Now that their curi- 
osity had been aroused, they asked question of everyone, 
but received no satisfactory answers. 

The day before Thanksgiving, Mrs. Brown came into 
the cellar with little Dickie Brown. After filling several 
pans with apples, nuts and vegetables, she turned to the 
pumpkins and picked out several of the aunts and uncles 
saying, "I think these will make very nice pies for Thanks- 
Page Seven 




tS^t College ^reettnstf 



giving dinner." Pointing to little Tommy she added, 
"Dickie, you may take that little one up to make a jack-o- 
lantern for the table." 

The pumpkins were carried up a long dark flight of 
stairs till they were brought into the sunny farmhouse 
kitchen. There the aunts and uncles were soon made into 
lovely golden pies and placed on the pantry shelf. 

It was here Tommy found them later, at first they did 
not recognize him for great pieces were missing in his 
sides and his internal structure was completely demolished. 
They spent that day and night in a frenzy of excitement. 

At last the great day came. Tommy was soon taken 
from the shelf and placed in the center of a long, long 
table. There he could watch everything because he had 
eyes now, thanks to Dickie Brown. From this favorable 
position he saw the guests come and then the dinner as it 
was served. After what seemed a long time the pies were 
brought on. Tears came into his eyes as he watched his 
aunts and uncles disappear. 

When the people had gone, Dickie took Tommy down 
in the cellar and placed him near his mother and father 
saying, "I think it's a shame Cousin Fred couldn't he here 
today. I'll save this until he comes so he can see it." 
Tommy was very glad to be home once more. He spent 
days relating his impressions of the feast and answering 
t|ie innumerable questions asked by his curious relatives. 

Marion Jane Robinson. 

AN EARLY NOVEMBER MORNING. 

What a glorious morning it was! One of those rare, 
beautiful mornings of early November that is almost in- 
describable to those who do not live in this climiate. The 
air, so different from that of the congested city, was 
fresh and full of fragrance caught up from the verdure of 
Mother Earth, The cows in the nearby pastures, yet wet 
with the night's heavy dew and the white and black wooly 
Pag« Eight 




tS'fit CoOese ^^reettngs; 



y^ 



sheep in the distance were standing with heads erect, nos- 
trils dilated as if they, too, were at every breath filling their 
lungs with the cool Autumn air. The big red sun had just 
made its appearance. It stood at a standstill on the 
horizon as if it were waiting for the stars to make a hasty 
retreat. The eastern sky was ablaze with the red, yellow, 
pink, lavender and gray rays of the sun while the other 
part of the heavens was as blue as turquoise, with a few 
small stars here and there. The tall trees, which on 
every side touched the sky, were strikingly beautiful in 
their new brilliant clothes. The dew-covered pastures 
dotted here and there with shrubs were even more beauti- 
ful than in the summer. There was nothing to mar the 
beauty or stillness of the morning. An occasional cock- 
a-doodle-doo or the sweet trilling of a song bird were the 
only signs of life. As I looked upon the sleeping world 
from my little twelve-paned farmhouse window I won- 
dered that it was my first realization of the beauty of 
things about us. 

Armeada Grace Brown, '18. 



THE RUINED NEW IDEA. 




"Oh dear, let's do have something different this year, 
Jane. I'm dreadfully tired of the same old kind of Hal- 
lowe'en party. A few stalks of corn propped lamely 
around the walls of the old barn, several jack-o-lanterns 
sputtering and smoking and the fortune-telling games we 
have played for ten years ! For myself, I intend to let my 

Page Nine 



I 




K^t CoUege 4lreettngs( 




ears listen to any whispering new ideas," said Eleanor. 
Then she and her chum chatted gaily on to other subjects. 
The next day as Eleanor was walking briskly down 
the leaf-strewn country road, her idea came and whispered 
in her ear. Why not have a party right out in the field.? 
The corn wigwams, the bright bonfires, the rising moon 
would make the loveliest Autumn setting. And besides, 
what a novelty it would be to send out invitations read- 
ing: "Please come to my field party on All Hallowe'en's 
Eve." Jane approved, so merrily began the planning 
of games, the creation of pies, and the sculpture of pump- 
kins, and Eleanor was happy in her new idea. 

At the mystic hour of midnight on the next-to-the-last 
of the beautiful days of the most beautiful of fall months, 
with a gentle flutter and rustle, out from the dozens of 
wigwams dotting the cornfield, came the little wee people 
dancing. But their happiness changed to consternation 
when they saw the unlit bonfires and the mutilated pump- 
kins. Then their dainty little queen, seated in majesty 
upon a golden maple leaf, gathered her subjects about 
her. 

"Our place of revels has been desecrated," said the 
tiny, dignified prime minister. "The thoughtless mortals 
plan to have it for themselves tomorrow eve, the only day 
of the year on which we may hold court before the hour 
of midnight. How wicked of them to take this spot, sa- 
cred to us at this one time of the year, since time im- 
memorial! Oh, queen, let us teach them a lesson." And 
at once the whole concourse agreed. 

Hallowe'en came, Eleanor and Jane and their friends 
gathered at the field, and fun ran high. But what pos- 
sessed things? The lovely dry leaves burned brightly, 
but marshmallows would not toast. "Pop!" they would 
go, and fall into the fire. Apples took to themselves 
wings and flew away into dark corners, and if an unwary 
hand attempted to pursue them, what hordes of tiny briers 
pricked it! Eleanor, sitting propped up against a corn- 
shock, was tormented by tiny, fluttering sounds, and now 
Page Ten 



^fft College ^reetmgg 




and again some invisible creature tickled her ear. She 
thot she could catch faint echoes of whispering voices, 
and yes, she was sure, every time she felt of her ear, a 
suspicion of a mocking laugh came from the blade of corn 
above her head. Such mysterious performances got on 
here nerves, and when she proposed a sing in the near-by 
home, the rest of the crowd seemed glad. As they trooped 
out of the field and up the road, they might have seen the 
happy, little, wee people dancing and prancing gleefully 
around the deserted merrymaking place. Eleanor and 
her new ideas bothered them no more. 

Helen McGhee, '16. 

HALLOWE'EN PARTY. 

It was a glorious company in motley array that gath- 
ered in the old chapel on Hallowe'en evening in response 
to an invitation given by the College Specials. Here be- 
fore witches, gobblins, ghosts, bandits, and many other 
characters, all became interested in "The Fate of Every 
Girl," which was cleverly given. In seven acts were pre- 
sented the charm of infancy; childhood days; when big 
dolls figured most prominently; school days, with its 
skates and apples; sweetheart days accompanied by 
candy, special deliveries, and a diamond ring; the joy of 
the wedding day; home-sweet-home; and in the dim 
candle light, the approach of old age. 

From the chapel, all proceeded to the post office, 
where much merriment was aroused by the messages 
each received from the Hallowe'en Prophet. 

In the society halls, yawning faces of pumpkins and 
demons held sway over the imitation of 1. W. C.'s new 
victrola. The delicacies of pumpkin-pie-tarts and fruit 
punch added much to the pleasure of the occasion, 

CIRCUS DAY. 

"Ladies and gentlemen! Please give your whole and 

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W^t College ^reettngiS 



undivided attention to the great circus procession which is 
now going to pass before you. First marches the band, 
grand, gorgeous, and gaudy; lumbering closely behind, the 
elephants, monstrous and magnanimous; following the 
elephants a terrifying, trembling train of tigers snapping 
their jaws at friends and foes alike; in great cages long, 
lengthy giraffes, lordly looking lions, babbling babboons, 
obnoxious ormithorehyuchi, prickly porcupines, ravenous 
rhinoceroses, lumbering leopards, and rampant rolbucks; 
and now, ladies and gentlemen frisking, frolicking toward 
you a marvelous display of those foolish fellows we call 
clowns; then lovely ladies enrapturing, enticing, and en- 
chanting mounted on black and white palfreys that prance 
impatiently while the bewitching beaming riders blush on 
everyone. Remember, ladies and gentlemen, before you 
moves the greatest show on earth!" 

. Francis Sconce, '20. 

STARTING FOR DREEMLAND. 

(Continued from last month) 

SCENE II. 

Time — The next night. 

Place — Same as scene I. 

Personae — Same as Scene I, without Barbara and 
Irene. 

Helen — "I wish Barbara and Irene would hurry back 
with those apples." 

Feril — "Probably they're having a hard time to get 
any." 

Winifred — "They can't get many because we have , 
to have them fried for breakfast." i 

Audrey — "Well, I won't eat any fried, anyway. I 
prefer mine raw." 

Helen— "Mary Louise." 

The M. L.s together— "What? Which one?" 

Audrey — "That's the Mary Louisae — or Mary Louise 
collectively speaking." 

Page Twelve 



^i)t College ^reettngse 




Helen — "Mary Louise Witbeck, come over and visit 
me." 

M. L. W. — "What for?" 

Helen — "Oh, just for fun. We might have a sort of 
progressive slumber party and all change beds and part- 
ners." 

M. L. W. — "Or we might have everybody kiss every- 
body else goodnight. I know a girl that teaches in a 
boarding school who has to go tell each girl on her corri- 
dor goodnight, and kiss them all." 

Peril — "Well, start something like that here, and 
watch me run for the lake." 

Helen — "Well, you needn't think anyone would run 
after you." 

Audrey — "There come the girls. Let's pretend to be 
asleep." 

Jo — "I wish you were." 

(Irene and Barbara enter softly, whispering to each 
other as they stumble over the mattresses on the floor. 
Peril gives a well-simulated yawn and pretends to have 
just awakened.) "What time is it?" 

Irene (whispers) — "Sh — about 12 o'clock." 

M. L. P. alond— "Isthatall?" 

Helen — "Hello, Barbara." 

Audrey — "Where are the apples? " 

Jo — "Give me one." 

Barbara* — "I thot it was funny if you had all gone to 
sleep already." 

Audrey — "I wish we had." 

Peril— "So do L" 

Helen — "Now, isn't it the limit! Everybody's sleepy 
but me tonight." 

TheM. L.s— "We're not." 

Peril — "Did you have any trouble getting the ap- 
ples?" 

Irene — "We shocked 'em to death, coming over in 
these costumes. They were all in bed. Ruth had to get 

Page Thirteen 



Wi^t College ^vtttinQi 




up and unlock the screen and everybody wanted to know 
what we wanted, and we couldn't tell them for fear they 
wouldn't let us have any apples, so we went out to the 
kitchen and got some bread and butter and finally slipped 
out when they weren't looking." 

Barbara — "But mum's the word. Don't breathe a 
word in the morning." 

M. L. P. — (sitting up in bed) — "Isn't that someone 
coming down the path?" 

M. L.W. — "Oh, girls — it's a man. He got behind that 
tree." 

Winifred — "Is the back door locked? " 

M. L. W.— "Yes, I locked it." 

Peril — "Well, if he comes any nearer, Pritz, you stand 
up and let him get a glimpse of you in those curlers and 
he certainly won't come any further." 

M. L. P. — "He's listening." 

Helen — "Oh, 1 know you can't see that far away with- 
out your glasses." 

M. L. W. — "It's not far — it's right down here.' 

Barbara — "Well, you all can scare him away. I'm 
going to sleep." 

Helen — "Come on, let's see if it is a man." 

M. L. W. — "All right — come on, Mary Louisae." 

M. L. P. — "Oh, I'm afraid there might be snakes out 
there and I'm lots more afraid of them than of men." 

"Fritz" — "Anyway, nobody can get in." . 

Jo — "Well, nobody would want to if they once got 
a glimpse of all these beds out here." 

Peril — "Oh, let's go to sleep. That's some of their 
attempts to liven things up. There's nobody there." 

M. L. P. — (Silently laughs). 

Winifred — "Stop shaking the porch so when you gig- 
gle, Mary Louise." 

Helen — "Well, if nobody will do anything else, guess 
I'll begin composing myself for sleep." 

Peril— "Goodnight, all!" 

Page Fourteen 



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^iit College ^^reetingg 



MATRICULATION IN GERMAN SCHOOLS. 

One of the most vital characteristics of the German 
people is their love of formalities, which regulates even 
the most personal details of their daily life. Not only in 
the cities, but even in the smallest departure. No elevator 
may be in use, unless it be examined at fixed intervals. 
These and similar laws, in fact, all tend to realize the Ger- 
man ideal of government, which strives to make order a 
citizen's first duty, or to express this thought in the 
Kaiser's own words: "Ordnung ist die erste Buerger- 
pflicht." 

It is therefore not surprising that really important 
questions, such as the education of the young, are regu- 
lated with the utmost care. Three months before a 
child's sixth birthday the Ministry of Culture notifies the 
parents that their boy or girl must attend school at the be- 
ginning of the next semester. The first move to matricu- 
late, therefore, is made not by the father or mother, but by 
the schoolboard in behalf of each child in the Empire. 
The parents then take their small son or daughter to see 
the principal or "Direktor" of one of the schools in the 
district in which they are taxpaying members. The neces- 
sary factor in this enrollment is to have the child's birth 
and vaccination certificates, and, if he be of Christian par- 
entage his "Taufschein" or minister's statement of bap- 
tism. After this interview the child is matriculated in the 
school, although his work does not begin until the com- 
mencement of the next term, whether it be Easter or 
Michaelmas. This is the case in all public schools. It is 
also a universal regulation that no student over twelve 
years of age can matriculate in a city or state institution, 
unless he has been vaccinated for the second time. 

The "Volksschulen" or free public schools even en- 
gage a physician to perform this operation in case the 
pupils cannot afford to have it done at home. To ma- 
triculate in these schools no examination is required, the 
child is merely obliged to show his most recent "Zeugnis," 
which is a certificate of his previous work. 

Page Fifteen 



tirte CoUege ^vtttinqi 




For admission to the "Hoehere Toechter Schulen," 
which are girls' school for the higher classes, and to the 
"Gymnasia," however, a very rigid examination is de- 
manded, even if the prospective student is leaving one 
public school to enter another merely perhaps on account 
of his father's change of residence. These matriculation 
examinations even for the very young children are very se- 
vere and complicated and for more advanced pupils they 
usually cover a period of at least five days and are most 
exacting. The student writes a theme, translations from 
the Latin, Greek, English, French or which ever lan- 
guages his specific course may require, and given a number 
of mathematical problems to solve. If the average of 
these written examinations are marked IV. or V., which 
is equivalent to our 60 per cent and less the pupil is not 
permitted to take the oral examinations. If they are III. 
or above, however, he takes his "Muendliche Pruefung" 
and his parents are notified by the government whether he 
of these examinations deviate slightly in the different 
of these examinations leviate slightly in the different 
kingdoms, grand duchies and duchies of the Empire, but 
the general regulations are carried out with equal exacti- 
tude in Prussia, Saxe- Weimar or A'nhalt. 

Thus when his subjects matriculate in school in their 
infancy, William II. has seen to it that accuracy is planted 
in their young minds, so that they may grow up to be more 
valuable members of his community in general and better 
soldiers in particular. 

Margaret Goldsmith, '17. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

At a mass meeting Tuesday morning, November 10, 
the Athletic Association adopted its new constitution. The 
main distinguishing point are: First, the athletic staff, 
which includes the executive committee and a representa- 
tive from each class is to supervise all enterprises for the 
promotion of athletic spirit and interest and control all 

Page Sixteen 




Cfie CoSese ^reettnstf 




matters not otherwise provided for; second, the awarding 
of trophies and honors to those winning first place in track 
events, to those girls making college teams and show- 
ing especial ability in the sport or event in which they par- 
ticipate; third, a provision stating that only those who 
have paid their dues are members. 

At the same meeting the association voted to put in 
a hard tennis court which is to cost $l5o. The court is 
to be a gravel one on a bed of cinders. We congratulate 
ourselves on this step as it is something we have been try- 
ing to do for several years. We can certainly prophecy 
the liveliest tennis tournament next spring that has ever 
occurred on our campus. 

Y. W. C. A. NOTES. 

The Geneva meeting held October 22nd was very in- 
teresting. The girls who had the privilege of going to 
the summer conference told of the beautiful camp in its 
appeal to the physical as well as to the spiritual nature. 

The association had the great pleasure of having Miss 
Corbett, the field secretary, as a guest for a few days. 
She had charge of the meeting for November 1st. The 
subject was "A Bigger View." She gave the members a 
wealth of information on the splendid equipment, in of- 
fices and office force that the Y. W. C. A. has. How 
great the work really is and how valuable was forcibly 
brought out. We cannot help feeling proud that we have 
a part in this great organization. 

Another treat came November 8th when Miss Olm- 
sted, the city's visiting nurse, told the association of her 
work. Much interest was aroused in the open air school 
and pledges have been made to help in buying the equip- 
ment. 

The meeting for November l5th, "The Rogues Gal- 
lery of the New Testament" was well conducted. Helen 
McGhee with the help of some of our new girls, Marjorie 
Barr, Aisla Allen, Reba Gaskins, showed types found in 

Page Seventeen 



W^t CoUese ^nttinfii 




the Bible which are not good ones to copy. 

The association received a letter from Miss Coppock, 
our Y. W. C. A. Student Secretary of Shanghai, China, 
which reads like a fairy story. Se tells of the school over 
there and its great work, adding bits of information about 
the customs and manners of the people that make it worth 
reading. Any one interested will find the letter on file 
in the association room. 

The attitude of all the girls toward the Week of 
Prayer was beautiful. The great crisis which all Chris- 
tian enterprises abroad are facing today was the theme 
for the prayers and is one that touches a responsive chord 
in every Christian heart. Every corridor is commended 
for its good attendance. 

The Association Monthly will be found on the maga- 
zine rack of the library. Do not fail to read it. Time is 
limited but one must not fail to keep in touch with the 
great movements of our association. In the November 
issue are articles on India, and China, and an especially in- 
teresting one on "War Times and Our Secretaries. 
Abroad." It shows the effect of war on the work of the 
association all over the world. 

The annual Christmas bazaar will be held December 
10th. Many useful and pretty Christmas gifts will be on 
sale. Your hearty support is solicited. Remember De- 
cember 10th! 

ALUMNAE NOTES. 

Cards were received by the friends of Francis Free- 
man announcing her marriage on the fourth of December 
to Mr. DeWitt T. Hartwell. They will be at home after 
the first of January at Marian, 111. Miss Freeman gradu- 
ated in the Home Economics department with the class of 
1913 and taught last year at Marian. 

At the home of Mrs. Edward Lambert Clifford in 
Evanston, 111., on October 17, an afternoon was held 
for the members of the Illinois Woman's College Associa- 

Page Eighteen 



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Kf)t College (^reetingfi 



tion. This was the semi-annual meeting of the associa- 
tion and was a social rather than a business meeting. 
About twenty-three were present although it was a rainy 
afternoon. Mrs. E. C. Fready is president of the associa- 
tion and Miss Clara Allan, who is a teacher in the Engle- 
wood High School, is secretary and treasurer. Miss 
Emma Mott, who has been doing fine work for a number 
of years as the director of the art department in the public 
schools of Chicago was also there. Among other guests 
were Miss Celia Cathcart and Laura Bannister, former 
students of I. W. C. 

During the last month a meeting of the Woman's 
Home Missionery Society of the Illinois Conference was 
held in Jacksonville. Mrs. Anna Stoward, who is presi- 
dent and Mrs, Lillian Griffith are both daughters of I. W. 
C. Among the delegates to the convention were quite a 
number of former students and also mothers of the present 
students. 

Mrs. Emma Graves Perkins of the class of '75 spent 
a few days in Jacksonville last week. She was returning 
to her home in San Francisco after attending the National 
Executive meeting of the Woman's Home Missionary So- 
ciety in Syracuse, N. Y., of which she is one of the most 
efficient officers. She is chairman of the Bureau of Ori- 
ental Work in San Francisco and is doing a wonderful 
work. 

Miss Nellie Reese of the class of 1900 has been re- 
cently elected president of the Woman's Club in Pana, 111. 

An item in the Northwestern Christian Advocate men- 
tioned the marriage of Miss Ruth Randle to Mr. Everett 
Warner. Mrs. Warner's mother was Mary Stookey, a 
member of the class of '76. Mrs. Randle's home is now 
in Springfield. 

The following taken from a letter written by Eliza- 
beth Dunbar, '13, assistant principal of the High School 
at Raymond, 111., did our hearts good: "I can't get along 
without our httle paper for it keeps me in touch with the 
college as I can do in no other way. I am putting it on 

Page Nineteen 



Ci)e CoUege ^netin^s 




the reading table in our High School and I notice that our 
students are reading it. I hope it may be the means of 
bringing some girls to the college." 

LAMBDA MU. 

Lambda Mu held an informal reception at the Colonial 
Inn November 14th, and altogether, there were about 
forty members and friends who enjoyed the evening to- 
gether. In the dining room a color scheme of pink and 
white was carried out; pink Killarney roses, the society 
flower, were much in evidence. In the receiving line 
were Miss Mothershead; Miss Neville; Mary Louise Wit- 
beck, president of the society; Helen Dewitt, vice presi- 
dent; and Wylma Cox, secretary. 

Among the out of town guests were Homer Wherley 
of Astoria, Fred Walker and James Rowland or Rushville, 
Ray Stickel of Greenfield, Alfred Cox of Murrayville, 
Charles Stewart of Urbana, and Mr. and Mrs. OIney Wit- 
beck of Belvidere, and Roy Ousley of Brocton. 

S» 

PHI NU NOTES. 

The "cozy" held in the hall last month was a fine 
success. A number of our former members were there 
and it is hoped that they will come often. Refreshments 
were served and it was not until the dinner bell rang that 
anyone realized that the afternoon was gone. We left 
with a feeling of reluctance saying what a cozy time we 
had had at this first "cozy" and looking forward to the one 
on November 19. 

Two quarts of cream could not be allowed to go to 
waste simply because they were not taken to the picnic so 
the society bought them at reduced rates and the plans for 
a pan-cake breakfast were made. Such panccakes! 
None ever tasted better and they disappeared even faster 
than hot cakes usually do. Long before eight o'clock 
the last scrap had vanished and even the tantalizing odor 

Page Twenty 




tliiz CoUese ^xtttixiQH 



was gone from the halls. We hope we can again indulge 
in "the cakes that Margaret made." 

The annual Thanksgiving banquet is to take place at 
the Colonial Inn on the 28th of November. There will 
be a number of guests, former members of Phi Nu, whom 
we will be especially glad to see. This is always the 
great event of the society year. 

BELLES LETTRES. 

The Belles Lettres library is now being catalogued. 
Faculty and students will be welcome to use these books. 

Word has been received of the death of Genevieve 
Dague's father on October 30 in San Antonio. The fun- 
eral was held in Danville, Mr. Dague's old home. 

Several of last year's Belles Lettres girls were 
Woman's College visitors at Thanksgiving time. 

Miss Irene McCullough spent the Hallowe'en week 
end with Alma Harmel and Margaret Coultas. 

THETA SIGMA. 

The life and novels of Bjournstjerne Bjournsen, the 
emminent Norwegian author, are to form what promises 
to be a very interesting course of study for the next two 
months. Book reviews of two, "Arne" and "Mary" have 
proven to be exceptionally interesting. Bjournsen, who 
received the noble prize in 1911, has written many novels, 
which are worthy of more consideration than our modern 
authors, as a rule, obtain. 

A very entertaining feature of one meeting was the 
answering of roll call by limericks. 

LOCALS. 

There have been a number of visitors this month: 
Mrs. Loveless, Mrs. Pawson, Mr. and Mrs. Witbeck, Mrs. 
Long, Mrs. Wilson, and Lela Waltrip have spent several 
day with daughters and friends. 

Page Twentj-one 




tirije CoUege Greetings; 




The second academy class is very glad to announce 
its class officer, Miss Berger. At the time of organization 
the following officers were elected: President, Marian 
Jane Robison; Vice President, Louise Land; Secretary and 
Treasurer, Thelma Walker. Although you have not 
heard much about our class, it will not be long until you 
do as we are a class full of "pep!" 

The Indiana Club had a picnic at Nichols Park Octo- 
ber 30. An unusually good picnic supper was enjoyed 
around a camp-fire. 

The Third Preps are glad to welcome Miss MacCoy as 
their class officer. The results of their election are: 
President, Nora Alexander; Vice President, Mary Fowler; 
Secretary, Ruby Baxter; and Treasurer, Jane Parkison. 
On November 2, the class enjoyed a masquerade party 
given by Mamie Kennedy at her home. The following 
Saturday the Fourth Preps entertained them at the home 
of Lena Johnson. A waffle breakfast at the Peacock Inn 
given by Miss MacCoy on November 16, was the latest 
of their social functions. 

Miss Mary Anderson gave a delightfully informal tea 
for those of third floor Marker on Monday, November 16. 

The Seniors cooked a sumptuous meal for themselves 
in the new students' kitchen Wednesday evening, Novem- 
ber 18. Fried chicken, combination salad, mashed po- 
tatoes, sweet potatoes, cake, and ice cream were a few 
of the things prepared. 
. The German Club held its first meeting November 1 8. 

During the last month try-outs have been held for 
the College and Academy Glee Clubs. We should have 
good lively music for every student event with two such 
promising organizations. 

A national convention of the Inter-Collegiate Prohi- 
bition Association is to be held at Topeka, Kansas, Decem- 
ber 29-January 1. One thousand delegates are expected. 
From the items sent to the office by this association, we 
see that a number of colleges are giving credit courses 

Page Twenty-two 




^f)t CoHtge Greetings; 




dealing with tiie liquor problem under the department of 
Economics and Sociology. The University of Southern 
California and Oregon Agriculture College are among the 
latest to adopt this plan. 

The standard of the Agricultural College of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois has been raised so much that over three 
hundred flunked last month. 

According to press reports, British colleges are hard 
hit by the war, Cambridge having only 1,5 00 students 
against 3, 5 00 last year, and the other universities being 
diminished in proportion. Belgium students are flock- 
ing to Cambridge in dire need. The University of Illinois 
is sendng a car load of clothng in response to a plea for 
aid. 

EXPRESSION NOTES. 

The first of the informal students recitals was given 
Wednesday, November I8th in Expression Hall by second 
semester students of last year and this semester's begin- 
ning students. There will be several of these student re- 
citals given each month, to which all are invited. Phcy 
are not in the nature of a formal program, but are simply 
the exhibition of what is accomplished in private lessons, 
in the establishment of elements of expression, showing 
the progress of the students. 

Miss decker is ready to announce that if the interest 
displayed is sufficient, a dramatic club will be organized 
in a short time. It will not be a departmental club, and 
is open to any one interested. The membership is to be 
chosen by two try-outs, which are to take place the first 
week after the Christmas holidays. A committee of the 
faculty will act as judges at the try-outs. The number of 
members to be chosen from the applicants and the nature 
of the try-outs will be announced later. The club will 
not be an independent organization, but will come under 
the Students' Association and have student officers. Miss 

Page Twenty-three 




Wt^t CoUese ^rtttinzti 




Gleckler should like to see and talk with all those inter- 
ested as soon as possible. 

Much interest has been shown in conversation among 
the girls themselves, for the beginning of a course in par- 
liamentary usage. Miss Gleckler should like to have this 
interest chrystalized in actual application and will all those 
who wish to take this course please see me Miss Gleekler 
before Thanksgiving, so that the necessary supplies and 
materials may be obtained in time to begin the class at the 
first of next semester. 



HOME ECONOMICS. 

On Saturday evening, November 7, the Misses Walk- 
er, Leicht, and Ames were hostesses to the girls of the 
Home Economics department at a very informal party in 
the Domestic Science room. The time was spent in blow- 
ing soap bubbles, making candy, popping corn and making 
it into balls. During the evening it was suggested that a 
Home Economics club be organized for the purpose of 
studying certain topics which are of special interest and 
which could not be taken up in the various classes. The 
consumers' league and the pure food laws were mentioned 
as being suitable subjects. 

On Friday evening the girls met to organize this club 
and the following officers were chosen for the coming 
year: 

Advisors — Misses Walker, Leicht, and Ames. 

President — Wilma Cox. 

Vice-President — Winnifred Burmeister. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Anna Moore. 

Program Committee — Hazel Kinnear, Grace Miles, 
Madeline Land. 



ART NOTES. 

Miss Knopf has her picture, "The Pine Woods" on ex- 
hibition with the American Artists Annual Exhibition, now 

Page Twenty-four 



tS^tie College ^reetinssf 



being- held at the Chicago Art Institute. This is the most 
important exhibition held in Chicago during the year and 
it is an honor to be included among the exhibitors. 

Dorothy Virgin, Ruth Young, Genevieve Meyers, 
Zella Rishel and Genevieve Spiece have recently enrolled 
in various art classes. 

Miss Knopf spent the week end, 14-15 in Chicago, 
seeing the American Exhibition and other exhibits in 
smaller galleries. 

THE MISSOURI CLUB. 

The Missouri Club appears on the scene this year, 
fewer in number but with just as much energy and push as 
ever. The new girls are a lively bunch and show great 
promise of keeping up the Missouri standard both in work 
and play. - 

Our officers are as follows: Marie Johnson, presi- 
dent; Alma Mitchell, treasurer; Edna Robb, reporter. 

The ten of us enjoyed a table party in the dining room 
Thursday night November I9th. The black and yellow 
and the Missouri mule were much in evidence. Just 
watch us. 



ENDOWMENT GIFTS. 

The chapel hour Nov. 3, was a time of rejoicing when 
Dr. Marker made announcement of two valuable addi- 
tions to the endowment fund. A gift of one thousand 
dollars was given by some friend in Jacksonville who 
withheld her name. With his characteristic twinkle in 
his eye Dr. Marker waited for the applause to cease only 
to add that he had had another happy surprise. Ten 
thousand dollars has been given to establish an endowment 
fund in memory of Nellie Beatrice Jarman by her aged 
father of Onargo, 111. The applause which followed 
showed with what hearty co-operation the girls will enter 
the next campaign. As never before the old chart seemed 

Page Twenty-five 



^t)e CoQege ^rtttinqa 




a thing of the past. How anxiously we will watch to see 
the squares marked off on a new one! 

1913 ENDOWMENT AND IMPROVEMENT FUND. 

Payments to this fund continue in a very gratifying 
way. Since the last report in May 355 subscribers have 
paid in $24,816.23, making the total amount now paid 
$135,230.38, and the balance remaining unpaid only 
$47,012.57. 

Of the 1226 subscribers to this fund, 561 have now 
paid in full. The Finance Committee hope that the 
friends who have not yet made their first or second pay- 
ments will now respond promptly. It is also hoped that 
all the subscribers will plan definitely to make full payment 
by next June, which is the final date for the settlement of 
the fund. 

NO ANNUAL THIS YEAR. 

The question was raised in the last issue of the Greet- 
ings concerning an annual for this year. It seems that the 
Juniors had been quietly making plans for the publica- 
tion of the "Illiwoco" for this year and asked permission 
to do so. After earnest consideration the Heads of De- 
partments decided that it is not advisable to publish an 
annual this year for two reasons: First, "There is undue 
pressure of work laid upon a few students which of neces- 
sity affects the more serious work of the college; second, 
the expense involved is heavy and should not be under- 
taken by the students two years in succession." All of us, 
sity affects the more serious work of the college; second, 
a decision, but are ready to abide by whatever is for the 
greater advancement of the school and its work. 

Eureka College Pegasus has a fine plan for putting 
class spirit to good use in giving different classes a chance 
to edit one of its numbers. Surely class enthusiasm will 
be well spent in the competition for the best number. 

Page Twenty-six 



I 



itJinHiiiirNiiMrnMiiHiiiiiiinMiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiiiiiiimiHiiiMininiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiMiitiiiiHiiiiiHn 

B = 

i GARMENTS FOR YOUNG WOMEN! 

The newest and most popular fashions of the day | 

reach our show room first — straie'ht from the work- i 

rooms of the New York workers. Attractive styles, | 

for the young- women, especially, are shown here in | 

profusion. | 



Coats 
Waists 



Suits 
Skirts 



Dresses 
Lingerie 



LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 




COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

Larg-e assortment of footwear 
for every occasion. 

Dress, Street and Bed-room 
Footwear 

h: o IP IP E i^ s' 

We Repair Shoes 



J. A. OBBRMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER 1 



THE COLLEGE STORE | 

Pennants, Stationery, Tennis Goods, Drug-s, School | 

Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory | 

Books and Photo Albums I 

"PLEASED customers" — OUR MOTTO I 

Goods Delivered | 

Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St. and Square | 

mHHiiiimiuiiuiiiimiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiMiiiniHiiiiiiiinHiiHiiHHiiiiiiutiinimiiiiiMunniiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiuiuMniiHniiMiiiHniiiiMiiMiHU 



giiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiniiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiHiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiniiriiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiinMiniiminiiniiiMininiiiimniiiin 

I 349 East State Street Studio: Southweat Corner Square 

i Otto Speith 

I Ibome {Portraiture 




Official Catalogue 

of Pictures Accepted 
in the Exhibit of 

A. OF A. 

Mary Carnell Philadelphia, Pa. 

E. E. Doty Battle Creek, Mich. 

H. S. Holland Charleston, S. C. 

The Daniel Studio Jackson, Miss. 

J. B. Schrlever Scranton, Pa. 

J. E. Van De Sande....New Smyrna, Fla. 

Carl Schlotzhouer Lancaster, Pa. 

S. H. Wmard Corona, Cal. 

The Tomllnson Studio Trenton, N.J. 

The Brown's Studio.. New Bedford, Mass. 

Fred H. Reed Wichita, Kan. 

Otto Spleth JacksoDTiUe, 111. 

Louis Dworshak ^^~' 

S. L. Fowler 



that we 1 
Hundred. 

Very often we a. 
our membership list 
for a concession and tht. 
important that we have a i. 
The first thing that the Ph 
piiers' Association of A» 
needs is a large membership, 
we can get anything we want 
is within reason. 

ARE YOU GOING TO 
YOUR PART? 



Picture Exhibit. 
The Picture Exhibit at the Con- 
vention was a grand success both 
in the number of prints submittetl 
and in the superiority of the work 
displayed. There were 5-50 prints 
.submitted, out of which there were 
19V which rated high enough to be 
placed in the accepted class. 



Clippings of the Official Catalogue of our standing in Photographers 
Association of America 



I COTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 



MAKERS OF 

CAPS 

GOWNS and 
HOODS 



I To the American Colleges and Univer- 
1 sities from the Atlantics to the Pacific. 
I Class contracts a specialty: 




WE SELL SERVICEI 

We do not run an ordinary type-setting 
plant — 

We leave that to the Other Fellow. 
When you have a job that requires 
quick action, send it to the only 
modern equipped shop in the city. 
Modern Machinery and the Ability to Use It 

The Roach Press 

308 Eait State Street 



I FLORETH CO. 

X 

s 

I Leaders in Millinery, Coats, 

I Suits and all your Dry 

I 

I Goods needs 

I Always lowest possible prices 



Coover & Shreve 

Have a complete line of 

Drugs, Kodaks, Perfumes, 
Stationery and Holiday Gifts 

We do Developing- & Printing- 
Bast and West Side Square 



i DON T FORGBT US 

s 
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Latest in JEWELRY, 
CUT GLASS and 

SILVERWARE 



AT 



Russell & Lyon's 

Oldest Established Jewelers 
in Central Illinois 

Both Phones 96 



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3 

Mathis, Kamtn & Shibe say I 

We can furnish your | 

Shoes and Party Slippers I 

in the popular styles, I 

leathers, and I 

fabrics i 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Member State and National Associations 



I McCULLOUGH STUDIO 



EAST SIDE SQUARE I 



M, B. (sitting behind two seniors who have on their 
caps and gowns) — "I wish they would take off their hats 
so I could see." 



sartg 

Concern 



printers!, ^ublisifiersi, Stationers; 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



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^iiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiMiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiinHHniiiiimiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiHiiniiuiiiiiiitiiiiiiHHiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiHHiiimiHiii^^^ 

I For those who discriminate 

I We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to 

I please the students who come to our city. We select only the 

I best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. 

I Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 

I Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

I Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 

I College functions. 

Vickery 3c Merrigan 



CATERERS 



227 W. State St. 



fBoth Phones 309 



I SAFEST PLACE TO TRADE 

IfjlLLERBY'^ 

I DRY GOODS STORE 



West Side Square 



Brady Bros. 

Kverything- in Hardware, 
House-furnishingfs and Paints 

45-47 South Side Square 



1 SEE 


"The Home of the Crispette" 


j Bonansinga 


The Sanitary Pop-corn 


f For Fancy Fruit and 


and Crispette Shop 


1 " Confectionery 


Pop-corn that melts in your mouth 
Roasted and Salted Peanuts 


1 72 East Side Square 


East State Street 



i. C* V* Frankenberg 

I Ladies^ and Gents^ Tailoring 

I Cleaning, Altering, 

I Repairing 

I Improved Machinery, 

I Best Work 

I 215 East State Street 



Established 1890 




Cloaks. Suits. ruHS.'<tmMiLUN£RY^ 



Low Prices Square Dealing 
Keep us busy 



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riDuUenir Si Ibamilton 

Confectionetfi 



CI.EANI.INESS 



SERVICE 



QUALITY 



Creams, Ices, Frappes, Sundaes, Sodas, Parfaits, 

Mousses and all Hot Drinks 

Home-made Candies and Salted Nuts 

The Store op Merit 



Phones 70 



216 East State Street 



Why pay more for no more? 

Let us sell you SHOES 

It means more spending money 
for you 

We cater to your wants 

A. SMITH 

j 

j The Popular Price East State Street 
Shoe Man 

WE REPAIR SHOES 



1. M. BUNCE & Co. I 



iprfntftts 



211 East Morgan Street 



A Cubists's use of marks of punctuation. 
r • He uses the bracket, period, dash, comma. 



r 



question mark, and the exclamation point. 



HARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers, 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greenhouses, Bell 775 



McGINNIS* I 

The Yottngf Ladies' Shoe Store | 

We carry a full line of Evening Slippersf 
in all colors. I 

If it's new, we have it f 



JAS. McGINNIS & 00.| 

East Side Square | 

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I 



Want 

Cut flowers 



FROM 



F 
E 

R 

N 
S 



JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

Both Phones 



You will find a complete line of 

FANCY GROCERIES 

at 

Walker's Grocery 

Home Cookingf a Specialty 
Both Phones 205 E. Morgan Stree^^ 



Job Printing 

Of All Kinds 

John K* Long 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 



213 West Morgan Street 
Illinois Phone 400 



E. R. at bonfire picnic trying to shield her face from 
the fire — "I'm afraid I'm to be sunburned." 



I Dorwan MUi 

I ALI^ KINDS OF 

IFRESH and SALT MEATS 
I PISH, POULTRY, Etc. 

iBoth phones 196 330 W. State St. 



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KODAK FINISHING 

Vulcan Roll Films 

Cameras from $2.00 up 
Everything- strictly first class 

Vail & Vail 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 B. Side Sq. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIinlltinillirillllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIKIHItllllllllllllll IIIIIMHIIIIIIItlllllll IIIIJ: 

THE STATIONERY STORE THAT SERVES I 



OUR MOTTO; 
Service and 

Satisfaction 



Milmert'6 



OUR MOTTO: 
Service and 

Satisfaction 



Headquarters for 

STATIONERY, POST CARDS, BOOKS, MAGAZINES, 
PENNANTS, NOVELTIES, CAMERAS AND 

PHOTO SUPPLIES 
LEATHER GOODS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

Table Runners, Matts, Cushions and Piano Scarfs 

Expert Developing and Finishing 

Open Days and Nights antil 9:00 P. M. 
Illinois Phone 450 
^ 59 Southeast Corner Square Jacksonville, Illinois 



R. P. — "I wanted to put up a poster for people who 
run through the halls. The speed limit must not be ex- 
peeded.' " 



(Tate Bat5 

I ant) annex for Habics 

221-223 East State Street 
I Illinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Art Needle Work 
and Millinery 

211 West state street 



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Phonss 800 

ROBERTS BROS. 

DRUGS AND GROCERIES 

We guarantee every purchase 

and delivery or money 

back 

ROBERTS BROS. 

29 South Side Square Phones 800 



S. S. Kresge Co. 

5c & IOC Store 

A popular place for College 
Girls 



The Store tor 



DRESS GOODS AND SILKS 




DRN GOODS STORF 



Kodak Shop 



A. H. Atherton & Son 



Under Farrell's Bank 



We Develop and Print Promptly 



W. H. M. S. Delegate — "Thank you so much for 
showing me around. 1 must be going down town now." 

Student — "If you can wait a minute, I'll get per and 
go with you." 

W. H. M. S. Delegate — "Who is per? " 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

I City Steam Dye Works 
Dry Cleaning of Fancy 
I Waists and Dresses 

I a Specialty 

B 
3 

I 330 Bast State St. JackBonrilie, 111. 
I Illiaoit Phone 388 

^WHilUHIIINIimillllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Illllllll Illltlll Illllllll IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIH 



Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



HIM* 



Visit 
SCHRAM'S 

Jewelry Store 

We have good-looking and good-wearing goods 
Will be pleased to show them 



All the Faculty, Students and Friends 
of the College should have a Checking 
or Savings Account with 

P. G. FARRBLL & CO. 

BANKERS 

F. E. Farrell, President 

E. E. Crabtree, Vice-President 

H. H. Potter, Cashier 

M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier 



T AYLOR' 

Grocery 

A g-ood place to trade 
221 West State Street 



s 



"That big dog you gave us actually does police duty 
at our house. 

"So? 

"Yes. He spends most of his time in the kitchen with 
the cook." Ex. 



College Printing: Specialists 

Year Books College Calendars 

Every Kind of Printing and Binding 
WRITE vs 

Pantograph Printing and Stationery Co^ 

BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS 



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The Latest in 

College Jewelry, Society 

Stationery, Bracelet 

Watches, Silver and 

Cut Glass 



AT 



BASSETT'S 



21 South Side Square 



C. J. Deppe & Co. 

Known for "Ready-TO- 

wear" and Popular 

Priced Dry Goods 



I Piepenbrings Variety Store 

i One block east of College 

I HERE TO PLEASE 

I Candies Cakes 

I Cookies Pies 

I Sandwiches Pop on Ice 

I Groceries California Fruits 

I School Suppiies 




BROTHE 



Rs! 



Jacksonville's foremost Store for Men 
and Specialties for Women 

Mannish Sweaters 

Mackinaw Coats, KnittedToques 

Mannish Rain Coats and Hats 

Trunks and Handbags 



Mollenbrock & McCuIIough 



SUCCESSORS TO 



McDougall's Studio 



234i West State Street 



Illinois Phone 808 



Ladies* Late Style Furs 



ARE SOLD BY 



Frank Byrns ^** 



Store 



Cherry's Livery 

Finest Light and Heavy 

Livery 

Lowest Rates 

23S'237, 302-304-306 North Main Stieet 



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ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEG] 

College of LiberalArts 
College of Music 
School of Fine Arts 
School of Expression 
School of Home Economics 

A Standard College — 
Regular college and academy courses 
leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 
inently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located 
in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 
dignified, old college town, noted for 
its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking for a good college. 

Call or address, Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, 111. 




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tlTije College i^reetingg 

Cjl The Colle J^e Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 

<ff Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the fifteenth of each month. 

<j| Subscriptions, $i oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
^ E'lt red at J icksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 

Contents 

Scandinavian Customs 3 

Christmas-tide in Cornwall 6 

Community Christmas Trees 8 

A Christmas Dilemma 10 

Jane's Christmas Carol 13 

Christmas Proclamation 14 

Christmas Carols • • • 15 

Christmas Recipes 15 

Twilight Thoughts 18 

Editorial 19 

Attention All! . , 20 

Home Economics 22 

ExpressionJ 22 

Music 23 

Art 24 

Society Notes 24 

New Basis of Membership for Y. W. C. A 26 

Y. W. C. A, Notes 28 

Calendar 30 

Jokes 32 

Locals 33 

Alumnae Notes 34 

Exchanges 35 

Senior-Junior Banquet 35 

Sophomore Notes 36 

What's in a Name? 36 

Egyptian Club 37 

Edwa d Howard Griggs I^ectures 37 

Thk 
Graphic Arts 

COMCBRH 



There's a song in the air! 

There's a star in the sky! 
There's a mother's deep prayer, 
And a baby's low cry! 
And the star rains it's fire while the beautiful sing, 
For the manger of Bethlehem cradles a King! 

In the light of that star 

Lie the ages impearled; 
And that song from afar 
Has swept over the world. 
Every hearth is aflame, and the beautiful sing 
in the homes of the nations that Jesus is King! 

We rejoice in the light. 

And we echo the song 
That comes down through the night 
From the heavenly throng. 
Ay! we shout to the lovely evangel they bring, 
And we greet in his cradle our Saviour and King! 

— Holland 





I 



^be College (grcetinQS 

Vol. XVIII Jacksonville, 111., Christmas, 1914 No 4 

SCANDINAVIAN CUSTOMS AND THEIR ORIGINS. 

If we investigate tlie origin of customs that are ob- 
served today at Christmas time, we wander far back into 
the ages of pagan rites and ceremonies to find their begin- 
nings — long before the Christian era began. 

Many of these rites and ceremonies were celebrated 
at the period of the winter-solstice, in Scandanavia, Rome, 
Greece and Egypt, where the pagan people feared, as the 
days shortened in the darkest month of the year, that the 
sun was dying and when the sun began to stay with them 
a little longer each day, they had a time of rejoicing. 
When the Christian teachers brought them light through 
the truth of the Gospel, the rites of the Christian religion 
were transplanted into the old pagan rites, partly because 
it was impossible to alienate these people from their cher- 
ished traditions and partly because the Christian leaders 
themselves believed that by adapting the features of the 
sun festivals as a conciliation to those who had broken 
with old beliefs and vowed allegiance to the new faith, 
Christianity would be rendered more acceptable and thus 
more effectually promoted. So it came about that the 
harmless features of the pagan festivals came to belong 
to Christmas. 

Many of the observances of Chrismas are derived from 
the worship of our pagan Scandinavian ancestors and are 
still cherished by the Scandinavian people. Two of the 
most popular customs are the hanging of mistletoe and 
the burning of the yule log. It is very interesting to note 
the legends connected with these customs. 

In the religion of the Druids, the mistletoe was re- 
garded with great reverence, because it was believed to 

Page ThrM 



^f)e CoUese ^vtttinqn 




possess wondrous curative powers. They called it "All 
Heal" and offered it as a sacrifice on their altars. 

The burning of the yule log is an ancient ceremony 
that originated with the Scandinavians, who at the feast of 
Juul at the winter-solstice, used to kindle huge bon-fires, 
called yule fires, in paying honor to their great god, Thor. 
The higher the flames leaped, the greater pleased was 
Thor. They soon learned that the trees upon which mis- 
tletoe clung made the brightest fires. They believed that 
Thor himself had caused the mistletoe to grow on these 
trees to let them know which were best for making great 
fires in his honor. So when anyone met under the mistle- 
toe in the great forests, no matter if they were great 
enemies, they dropped their weapons and greeted each 
other kindly and would not take up arms against each 
other until the sunrise of the next day. This was their 
tribute to Thor. They began to take the mistletoe into 
their dwellings and hang it over the doorways and no 
enemy could enter underneath it without becoming a 
friend to the people living inside. From this came the 
habit of greeting with a kiss people who step under the 
mistletoe. 

According to the old legend, the Scandinavians were 
the first people to have the Christmas tree. In the eighth 
century Saint Winifred tried to show the people that the 
Druid priests had made them worshipers of trees and not 
of a living God and on Christmas eve he hewed down the 
great oak tree around which they had gathered to offer a 
human sacrifice. As it fell, a young fir tree seemed to 
appear miraculously beyond it, so Saint Winifred told them 
that this little tree which pointed to the sky was the living 
tree with no stains of blood upon it and it should be the 
sign of their new worship. He told them to carry it to 
the chieftains hall and go no more into the shadows of the 
forest to keep their feasts, but to keep them at home with 
laughter and songs and rites of love. Now the Scandina- 

Page Four. 




QTtie CoUtqt ^reeting£( 



vian people, with whom the custom originated, still keep 
these rites of love and the custom of the Christmas tree. 

The custom of making gifts seems to have been from 
the earliest times, the expression of a thankful heart, 
though we like to think that it is because the Wise Men 
brought gifts to the Christ Child at Christmas time. The 
Scandinavian people have curious ways of giving presents 
at Christmas time. The Julklapp is a gift wrapped up in 
innumerable coverings. The person who brings it arrives 
unexpectedly, raps noisily at the door and throws or 
pushes the Julklapp into the room. He must come and 
go like lightning without revealing who he is. Great 
efforts are made to so conceal the gift that the person who 
receives it, after much trouble in undoing the wrappings, 
may need to search and search to find it. Sometimes a 
tiny gold ring is hidden in a heavy box or a little gold heart 
in a Christmas cake. Occassionally a man contrives to 
hide in the Julklapp and thus offer himself to the lady of 
his choice. 

Another custom which is found in the better class of 
Swedish homes is for the Christmas presents to be given by 
two masked persons — a man and a woman. The old 
man carries a bell and rings it, the old woman carries a 
basket full of packets which she delivers to the addresses. 

The simple folk of the Scandinavian countries have a 
vivid sense of the nearness of the supernatural on Christ- 
mas Eve. On yule night no one should go out for he may 
meet all kinds of uncanny beings. In Sweden the Trolls 
are believed to celebrate Christmas eve with dancing and 
revelry, and the little Trolls are thought to ride over the 
heath on wolves to their assemblies. On Christmas morn- 
ing between cock-crowing and day-break it is highly dan- 
gerous to be out. 

It is also a folks-belief that Christmas eve is the time 
when the dead revisit their old homes, so the living pre- 
pare for them with dread, yet with a desire to make them 
welcome. When the festivities are over and everyone 



Page Five 



tB^e €oUtqt ^reettngsf 



has gone to rest, the parlor is left tidy and adorned, with 
candles lighted and a great fire burning. The table is 
covered with a festive cloth and filled with food and a 
jug of yule ale. The chairs are wiped clean with a white 
towel and in the morning are wiped again and if any earth 
is found they believe some kinsman, fresh from the grave 
has sat there. 

Not only these customs of the Scandanavian people but 
most all of the observances of Christmas have had their 
beginning long, long ago and little do we think when we 
are gathered for the Christmas festival in memory of God's 
Gift to the world, that the rites and customs we are ob- 
serving have been handed down from those pagan people 
who were groping for, yet did not know, the one living 
God. 

OlaWendel, '16. 

CHRISTMAS-TIDE IN CORNWALL. 

In the little county down in the southwest corner of 
England, many of the ancient Christmas customs of "mer- 
rie England" are observed. It is only in the gardens of 
Cornwall that one may find the real Christmas roses, 
whose petals strewed the snow on that first Christmas 
night. When these cherished flowers begin to bloom 
one may feel sure that Christmas is near. 

For days before, the air is heavy with clove, cinnamon, 
and saffron, for the wonderful cakes and puddings which 
are indispensable at this time of the year. The confec- 
tioner's shops are gay with cakes made in Christmas shapes 
and decorations. Most of the shops are beautifully decor- 
ated with real greens, from the abundance found in the 
country round. The hedges are green with rich growths 
of rough but beautiful furze, bristling with yellow blos- 
soms like small candles. There are many ever-green 
trees, but even the leafless trees look summer like in their 
rich draperies of ivy. Everywhere may be seen the glossy. 

Page Six 



®f)e College ^reettng£( 




brilliant holly bushes, with berries so large and thick, as al- 
most to hide the leaves. The church is decorated with 
ever-green. Probably at no time of the year do the old- 
fashioned buildings look so attractively beautiful as when 
decked with yew and myrtle and Christmas flowers. 

In Cornwall a tree is considered necessary, but a very 
different one from that to which we are accustomed. The 
favorite sort is a holly bush, not too large, to stand on a 
table, but sturdy enough to hold gifts. The trimmings 
are often poor but abundant, for although the Cornish 
working people have little money to spend on tree decora- 
tions, they are by no means lacking in holiday spirit. 

On Christmas eve, on all sides, may be heard the sound 
of children's voices singing carols. With an almost un- 
earthly beauty they come ringing over the hillsides, 
"Nowell, nowell, nowell, nowell, 
Born is the King of Israel," 
or "Hark the herald angels sing," or many another strange 
old carol. 

The carolling continues all through the Christmas 
week but bursts out in full force on New Years Eve, for 
the Cornish people do not end their holidays with Christ- 
mas Day. That is only the real beginning, to them. Shops 
are not open for three or four days. Football posters an- 
nounce a series of holiday games. The day after Christ- 
bas, boxing day, is almost more of a holiday than the twen- 
ty-fifth itself. Even the train service is very much lim- 
ited. The origin of the holiday was the occasion upon 
which the poor people assembled and unpacked boxes 
which their rich neighbors had sent to the church for them 
on Christmas day. The twenty-eighth is kept as Holy 
Innocent's Day, on which no one washes anything, not 
even a dish, because of the superstition that "you will 
wash one of your own family into the grave within the 
year." 

At midnight on New Year's eve, when the muffled 
chimes begin to toll, there is an intense silence while the 



Page Seven 




tSht CoUese ^vtttinzi 




ringers scurry up the dark stairways to snatch the leather 
mufflers from the clappers before the twelfth stroke shall 
sound. Then bursts forth a deafening combination of 
chimes, fog-horns, band instruments, and steamer whistles, 
welcoming the New Year, and announcing the end of the 
Cornish Christmas. 

Louise Harries, '15. 

COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS TREES. 

How fortunate are the children who have a Christmas 
tree in their homes, but there are thousands who do not 
have this treat or have even seen a Christmas tree. No 
doubt this fact brought about the idea of the big out-door 
tree, to which both rich and poor can come with their 
Christmas spirit and feel that they really are helping some 
one else to have a merry Christmas. 

The first out-door Christmas tree in the United States 
was erected in Madison Square, New York, on Christmas 
eve, 1912. This tree was a great success and it seems al- 
most, as one writer has said, as if "the star which shone 
from the topmost twigs of this gigantic tree must have shot 
off sparks, which fell all over the country, for on the 
Christmas eve of 1913, the Christmas tree stars came out 
one by one in many places between the Atlantic and Pa- 
cific oceans." 

The community Christmas trees are generally lighted 
every evening during Christmas week and programs are 
given around the tree by different choruses and glee clubs. 
A spectator has said in reference to the first celebration 
in New York, "Some people came in furs and in their auto- 
mobiles, many by trolley and subway and more walked 
from a distance. Scattered through the crowd were hun- 
dreds of outcasts, and it was noticed that silver was passed 
quietly from gloved hands to bare ones." 

The first year that the tree was erected in New York, 
there were from five to fifteen thousand people present. 

Page Eiglit 




Wiit College ^reettngii 




They began coming at half past four. After the singing of 
"Holy Night," by the Oratorio Society, a child was taken 
from the crowd and it pushed the electric button which 
lighted the beautiful star of the upper branches and the 
thousands of lights on the trees. After supper the pro- 
gram was continued. A military band played patriotic 
and religious selections, there was also a quartette of 
church soloists and later a negro chorus of a hundred 
voices sang old-time plantation songs. The crowd did 
not leave until at midnight, when the Metropolitan chimes 
sounded the notes of "America," and the lights were 
turned out. 

When the people in the capital of the United States de- 
cided to have a community tree there was no debate as to 
where it should be placed. The capitol plaza was the one 
spot in Washington for the nation's tree. The tree was 
beautiful and surely a heart-warming spectacle. "In the 
crowds that surged about it were representatives of the 
diplomatic service from many lands, little foreign kiddies 
having an American Christmas, army and navy officers, 
a full force of Uncle Sam's big civil service family, and all 
kinds and conditions of people, black and white." At the 
foot of the stairs, the marine band played continuously and 
when 't broke into the strains of "Hark, the Herald Angels 
sing," the crowd around the tree burst into song. 

It probably will be of interest to the girls here in 
school, to know that Miss Olmsted, the visiting nurse in 
Jacksonville, is hoping to have a community tree here this 
Christmas. She is working together with the Commer- 
cial Club and they are looking forward to giving the chil- 
dren of Jacksonville a merry Christmas. If all plans are 
successful, the public school will have charge of the music 
and the city has promised to wire and light the tree. 

Is this not a wonderful idea to carry out in the cities, 
where so many poor children hardly know of the beauti- 
ful Christmas and its meaning? The little children who 
gather about the decorated shop windows at Christmas 

Page Nine 



JEfit CoUege ^reettngs: 



time, are all very anxious to know what it all means and 
often times they know only that it is a time when friends 
give gifts to each other. They have no idea that it is the 
Saviour's birth we are celebrating and that the gifts we 
give are only small remembrances. By bringing the 
people together around a big out-door tree, many of them 
hear for the first time the glad song telling of the birth of 
Christ, which brought — Peace on earth and good will 
among men. Johanna Onken, '17. 

A CHRISTMAS DILEMMA. 

The shades of evening deepened. Outside the whirl- 
ing, writhing, twisting snow flakes filled the air and so 
thickened it that the hurrying people on the street below 
seemed only moving shadows to Emily Louise, as she 
stood watching them from her window in the topmost 
story of Harding College. 

it was Christmas eve, a time when all should be re- 
joicing, but Emily Louise, the sweetest and prettiest Fresh- 
man in college, was homesick and lonely, desperately so. 
Fate had determined that she must spend that holiday of 
holidays miles and miles away from home in the dreary 
and deserted college with four or five other just as miser- 
able girls. Even her roommate was gone. 

Perhaps it wouldn't have been so bad if Miss Ryan had 
been left in charge of them. But Miss Medalie! Im- 
possible! 

It was shameful, so Emily thought, that she should 
have to come away out here to acquire college culture, and 
untold wealth of knowledge just because it was her Aunt 
Mehitable's alma mater, and because that venerable lady 
had firmly asserted that unless her niece complied with her 
wishes she should not be included in her will and should 
not receive the sapphire necklace which had come down 
from their Norman ancestry. For the sake of the neck- 
lace Emily Louise came. 

Page Ten 




Ci)e CoUese Greetings; 




Visions of the Christmas tree, the gifts, the music and 
laughter of the festival revelers at home flashed vividly 
before her, and before she realized it she was relieving her 
emotion by tears. Of course it was silly, but she couldn't 
help it. There was one consolation, however, she was 
just a Freshman instead of a Senior and could weep oceans 
without disgracing herself. 

By chance she turned and glanced into the mirror only 
to discover, to her horror, that her eyes were attaining an 
unbeautiful red and fast becommg 

"Two walking baths, two weeping motions. 
Portable and compendious oceans." 

Being unable to permit that, she hastily removed all 
traces of her tears with some of the nice new pink Parisan 
powder which Sarah Adelaide had given her and wandered 
out to see if the other prisoners were as miserable as she. 

She found them all in Marion's room lamenting their 
woes. 

"Oh, I just know we shall all die of loneliness," 
mourned Margaret. Several others corroborated her 
statement. 

"I won't get to hang up my stocking," sobbed little 
Anna. 

"Anna Courtney! You don't mean to say you hang 
up your stocking! That's a child's game," exclaimed 
Marion. 

"Yes, I do," acknowledged the weeping Anna stoutly. 
"Its loads of fun and there is always something especially 
nice way down in the toe. It's so exciting to feel the 
lumpy packages and wonder what they are." 

"Oh," wailed Margaret, hiding her face in a pillow. 
"Please stop talking. It makes me feel worse than ever." 

"Girls," cried Mildred, who always came to the rescue 
in times of need. "We are here; there is evidently no 
chance of getting away, so lets make the best of the propo- 
sition. You all have lovely boxes from home. Why not 
have a big spread in my room for our Christmas dinner? " 



Page Eleven 



Wi^t College ^xtttitiQi 



The atmosphere brightened perceptibly. 

"Oh, don't wait until tomorrow. Have it tonight," 
came a suggestion. 

"I suppose we shall have to invite Miss Medalie? " 

"Certainly." 

So it was agreed. 

That night, as the merry-makers prepared their feast, 
Mary brought consternation upon them all by exclaiming, 
"Girls, among all these dainty eatables there isn't a morsel 
of fudge. I simply must have some." This, indeed was 
quite characteristic of that young lady for she absolutely 
could not exist without candy, especially fudge. In fact, 
her one dream was to possess a confectioner's store of 
which she should be chief manager and consumer. 

"Ruth is gone and not one of us can make respectable 
fudge. What shall we do? " came from one of the party. 

"Draw straws," suggested another. 

They did and the lot fell to Miss Medalie. The girls 
gasped inaudibly. Somehow they couldn't conceive of 
that august personage doing such a trivial thing as making 
fudge. But she did, and in doing it she threw aside the 
grandeur and icy reserve and became as jolly and com- 
panionable as any girl there. 

So fun and laughter reigned and the girls forgot their 
isolation. 

That night cuddled in their "comfy" little bed Emily 
Louise and Mary recounted the joys of their pleasant even- 
ing. 

"Wasn't it perfectly lovely? " whispered Emily Louise. 
"Great," mumbled Mary through a chocolate cream 
which she had discovered on Emily Louise's table. 

"And isn't Miss Medalie a dear?" continued Emily 
Louise. 

"Yes,' breathed Mary, and then estatically, "And 
doesn't she make heavenly fudge!" 

Page Twelve 




^e College Greetings; 




Then followed dreamland, and Christmas eve passed 
into Christmas day, bringing peace and gladness to all, 
even to the inmates of Harding College. 

Maud Strubinger, '18, 

JANE'S CHRISTMAS CAROL. 

For the first time during that last busy day before 
Christmas vacation, Jane was alone. Even Jean, her 
room-mate, was away practicing carols. Propping her- 
self up among the pillows on her cot she leaned against 
the window sill and watched the blizzard outside turning 
the campus white. 

"How good it is to be here in this old school," she 
thought, "and oh, what a good time I've had since I've 
been here ! My last Christmas vacation at school ! Only 
one more thing today, the special Christmas services in 
chapel. Goodness, but I hate to think that this is the last 
time I'll go through all the excitement of the last day be- 
fore vacation. From the very minute I woke up this 
morning I had an unusually Christmasy feeling — even 
more than I've had all week." 

The two girls had awakened early, too excited to sleep, 
and had talked about the things that had to be crowded 
into that last short day. It had been almost impossible 
for them to keep still during their classes. All over the 
building girls rushed here and there, finishing their pack- 
ing, slipping little gifts into trunks when no one was look- 
ing, laughing and talking about their trip home. Trunks 
scraped across the floors as the girls pushed them from 
one part of their room to another. 

Jane surveyed their room from her perch on the cot. 
It was straight now and nearly everything packed. She 
could scarcely wait until she and Jean would leave tomor- 
row. "Oh dear," she sighed, "there's another thing I 
hadn't thought of; this is the last Christmas Jean will spend 
at our house. How will I ever get along without her 

Page Thirteen 



(S^e CoOese ^vtttingi 



now? Why, even the rest of the family think of Jean 
and Christmas together as much as I do." 

It was almost dark now and Jane, tired out from ex- 
citement, leaned back sleepily among the pillows. 

"Jane, Jane, it's time to go to chapel — hurry up," 
and several girls pounded on the door, before they rushed 
into her room. She jumped up and ran down the hall 
with them, getting into chapel just as the first lines of 
"Silent Night, Holy Night" were sung. Jane could hear 
Jean's voice in the chorus. 

Jane Murrey awoke suddenly and looked about her in 
a startled manner. Where was she and what had she 
been doing? Where was Jean and the girls and chapel? 
The large library, the red coals in the fireplace in front of 
her, the dim twilight outside only helped to confuse her. 
Then suddenly she remembered. She was no longer in 
college, had been away four years, and was now spending 
the holiday with an old friend. It had been only a dream ! 
And Jean! How she did want to see her. For some rea- 
son Jean had never answered that last letter written al- 
most two years ago. But what was that she heard? Sure- 
ly it was the same song and the same voice she had heard 
in her dream. 

"Silent night! Holy night! 

All is calm, all is bright: 

Round yon Virgin Mother and Child! 

Holy Infant, so tender and mild. 

Sleep in heavenly peace." 
Jane ran into the next room and there was Jean, the 
same old Jean of her dream, the same Jean, whose favor- 
ite carol was "Silent Night, Holy Night." 

Helen Ost, '17. 

CHRISTMAS PROCLAMATION. 

December 24th has been set aside as Illinois "House" 
Red Cross Seal Day. On this day every house in Illinois 

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tS^t College Greetings; 




must have a Seal on its entrance. It will cost one penny 
but will tell a story to the passerby that the inmates are 
helping to exterminate the great white plague. Get your 
Seals now. If there is no agent in your town write to 
headquarters, and Seals will be sent at once. 
Very sincerely yours, 

Harriet Fulmer. 
111. 1914 Red Cross Seal Campaign Headquarters: 
1212 Hartford Bldg., 85 Dearborn St., Chicago. 

CHRISTMAS CAROLS. 

What a good feeling it gives us when we begin to sing 
Christmas carols at chapel. For we know then that it will 
not be long until we will go out to sing carols and then go 
home for the holidays. 

Carol singing is one of our college traditions. Under 
the auspices of the social service department of the Y. W, 
C. A. the girls are formed into groups to practice the 
carols. The churches are glad to give us the names of 
any who are sick and shut in and the night before we go 
home for the holidays we go out and sing to them. 

We think then, that these songs which we have al- 
ways known and loved, have never sounded sweeter than 
they do when sung out in the cold, clear air, and we seem 
to feel more deeply the spirit of Christmas. 



CHRISTMAS RECIPES. 
Fondant. 




2 cups sugar , 

2-3 cup water 

1-8 teaspoon cream of tarter 



Page Fifteen 



Zf)t College ^reettngsf 



Method — Mix ingredients in a smooth saucepan and 
heat gradually to the boiling point. Boil until mixture 
forms a soft ball when tested in cold water, stirring slowly 
only until sugar is dissolved. Wash sugar from sides of 
saucepan with a damp cloth. Pour into a buttered dish. 
Do not scrape the pan. Cool without disturbing until a 
dent made with the finger holds its shape. Stir until 
creamy and when stiff enough knead with the hands until 
smooth. This may be worked into cream candies, choco- 
late creams, or filling for dates. 

Candied Orange Peel. 

To candy orange, lemon, or grape fruit rind, soak over 
night, then cut into tiny strips with scissors. Boil in 
three waters for twenty minutes each and drain. Have 
ready a syrup made by boiling equal parts of sugar and 
water, and in this boil the rind until transparent. Drain 
and roll in fine granulated sugar. The grape fruit straws 
are especially delicious. 

Marshmallows. 

2 cups of sugar 
1-2 box Knox gelatine. 
Method — Dissolve the gelatine in 10 tablespoons of 
water. Cook the sugar with 10 tablespoons of water for 
2 minutes, then add the dissolved gelatine and beat for at 
least twenty minutes. 

Line a pan, sides and bottom, with powdered sugar. 
Pour the beaten candy into it and cover with powdered 
sugar. Let it stand a while before cutting. 

French Nouget. 

Boil 2 cups of sugar, 1-2 cup white Karo syrup and 
5 tablespoons water until brittle when tried in cold water. 
Also boil 1 cup sugar and 5 tablespoons water until it 
forms a soft ball in cold water. 

Beat the whites of three eggs in a large platter and add 
to them the above mixtures as they are ready, beating con- 
Page Sixteen 



MdBUBBKi 



tB^e College ^reetingtf 




stantly. Add nuts, figs or dates and beat until cool. 
Flavor as desired. Pour into buttered plates and cut into 
squares. 

Peppenninta. 

Melt the fondant over hot water adding a few drops of 
hot water and flavoring. Stir constantly to avoid the 
formation of a crust. Color may be added when melted. 
Drop from the tip of a spoon upon oiled paper. Winter- 
green may be used. 

English Toffee. 

2 cups brown sugar 

4 tablespoons weak vinegar 
1-4 cup butter 
1 cup nuts 
Cook the butter, sugar, and vinegar over a moderate 
heat. Boil to the snap stage. 

Spread the broken nuts in a well buttered pan or 
plate and pour the syrup over them. Mark in squares. 

Panouchi. 

1 cup milk 

1 tablespoon butter 

3 cups light brown sugar 
1 teaspoon vanilla 

3-4 cup nuts, pecans or English walnuts 
Bring the milk and butter to the boiling point; add the 
sugar and cook to the "hard ball" stage. Remove from 
the fire, cool without jarring, add the nuts and vanilla, 
and beat until creamy. Pack in a buttered pan or plate 
and mark in squares before it is too cold. 

Fried Marshmallowt. 

Toasted marshmallows have become so common that 
we welcome a change in fried ones. Cover the bottom of 
a pan with melted butter and fry the marshmallows to a 
delicate brown over a moderate heat. 



Page ScTwtMB 



Wift College 4^reettngs; 



TWILIGHT THOUGHTS. 

The sunset brings the close of parting day; 

The brilliant landscape fades into the night; 
A solemn stillness lies o'er all the way; 

In vain I look about me for the light. 

As night tide turns the gladness into gloom, 

And mystic wind sighs ghostlike through the trees, 

This trembling heart forbodes of darkening doom 
And stern reality its right decrees. 

Yet in sweet friendships' healing stream is found 
The balm to aid the soul, to cheer the hour 

And memories dear of Freshman days abound, 
As many as spring breezes in a bower. 

The flight of time goes on, the hour will come 

When school-day joys will cease and years unroll 

The grimness of our fate for us to hear 
And freeze the genial current of our soul. 

As up the heights and down the steeps we go 
And each with each our joys and burdens bear, 

The germ of fame is born to grow and glow 
Till all the world amazed will stop and hear. 

Let honor spur us on to distant goal, 
Let duty fill our lives with useful toil, 

Until at last we reach the topmost knoll 

And see the tangled threads of hope uncoil. 

Ruth Mendenhall, '18. 

Page Eighteen 




^t €o\kqt ^xtttinqi 



m 



Faculty Advisor — Miss Mary Anderson. 

Editor in-Chief — Helena Munson. 

Associate and Alumnae Editor — Winifred Burmeister. 

Assistant Editors— Helen McGhee, Elaine Buhrman. 

Art Editor— Dorothy Stevens. 

Business Manager— Audrey Berryman. 

.\ssistant Business Managers— Alma Harmel, Mary Harrison. 




A Merry Christmas and a Happy New 
Year is the wish of the Greetings for 
everyone. 





What has college meant to you? What does Christ- 
mas mean to you? Has college helped you to find added 
meaning in the Christmas spirit? Are you better enabled 
to bring the spirit of joy and love to those in your home 
community because of your experiences here at school? 
How are you going to show during these three weeks vaca- 
tion, what college has done for you? 

Each one of us may well pause to think of how we, 
personally, would answer such questions. If each one of 
us has not found fuller meaning in the spirit of Christmas 
from the singing of carols, from our happy associations 
with new-found friends, from the broader life of college 
in general, we have not received all that college life has 
had to give. If, however, we can go home, slip quietly 
into our old places, make the people of the community feel 
that we have come home to be one of them, and by an 
unpretentious influence help them to find the real Christ- 
mas joy, the sacrifice which has been made in order that 
we might be in school will not have been in vain. 

There are many ways in which we can help to ra- 
diate the true Christmas joy without exchanging expensive 

Page Nineteen 




W^t College ^^reetingtf 



gifts. Many of us can enter heartily into the fun of prep- 
aration by helping our smaller brothers and sisters to make 
the hearth look festive with evergreen which need cost 
nothing. An evening around the fire spent in telling jolly 
stories, cracking nuts, and popping corn is far more near 
an ideal Christmas Eve than one spent in the crowded 
shops, scrambling frantically for the last unpurchased gift. 
If it has not been customary to sing carols, you may be 
the means of gathering a group of young people together 
for such a purpose. The simple ways for bringing joy to 
human hearts are innumerable and each one must find 
them for herself. Your increased ability to help others 
and the manner in which you offer this help will be the 
best of what college has meant to you. 



ATTENTION, ALL! 

A short story contest has been arranged by the staff 
of the Greetings which is open to any student of the Illi- 
nois Woman's College. A prize of $5.00 will be given for 
the best short story, $3.00 will be given as a second prize, 
and a subscription to the Greetings for the remainder of 
the year will be the third. The contest will close Feb. 10 
and all stories must have been put in the Greetings box 
by that date. 

Put on your "thinking caps" and make them yield 
you returns. Any stories which you have already writ- 
ten and which have not been published in the Greetings 
hitherto may be entered. 

The right is reserved to use any material which is 
handed in, at a future date. The right is also reserved to 
withhold the prizes if the stories submitted do not merit 
them. 

Putting things off till tomorrow takes almost as much 
time as doing them now. 

Page Twenty 



tlfn CoUege ^vutin^i 




The Survey gives a short account of the effect of the 
war on the international Y. M. C. A. work. Over 200,- 
000 members of the European association and nearly 
every one of the secretaries are reported to be in the ranks 
of the fighting armies. The Paris association building has 
been transformed into a hospital left in charge of the wife 
of the secretary, while he is gone to war. The president 
of the French National Y. M. C. A. Committee is chair- 
man of the French Red Cross Society. John R. Mott has 
given up his journey among the colleges of the levant and 
has gone to help in association work in Europe. 

One editor makes the suggestion that, when the time 
for peace making comes in Europe, the United States 
should put the following proposition to the nations of the 
world : 

"It is time for us to abandon offensive armament and 
the insane policy of preparation for war. The United 
States will reduce the size of its navy in common with 
other powers, the measure of reduction to be agreed upon 
between us. The United States will enter a compact to 
build no more battleships for five or ten years as common 
consent may determine. The United States will bind her- 
self to maintain only such armed land forces as are neces- 
sary for purposes of national policing, this to be the pro- 
gram of all powers. 

"The United States will join in establishment of a per- 
manent court of arbitration at The Hague for settlement 
of all questions of international controversy and will agree 
that her navy shall become part of a world navy for the 
purpose of enforcing decisions of this court should such 
action be necessary." 

At the fall election two women were elected to fill the 
office of county superintendent of schools in two counties 
of Illinois. 



Page Twenty-one 




W^ CoOtge ^reetingK 



HOME ECONOMICS. 

Some of the members of our department had an op- 
portunity to show their skill along domestic science lines 
on December 3rd, when we celebrated the birthday of 
Mrs. Ellen H. Richards. The stunt, given at that time, 
emphasized the high cost of living at the present time as 
compared with that of colonial days. An interesting 
paper was read by Edna Babcock on the life of Mrs. 
Richards, whose work on the development and betterment 
of the home will always stand out in the history of home 
economics. 

The various sewing classes have succeeded in com- 
pleting twelve suits of clothing for the children of the 
fresh air school. 



EXPRESSION NOTES. 

The second students' recital occurred Friday after- 
noon, December 11, at 4:1 5. Those who took part in 
the program were: Marion De Pew, Helen Butler, Ber- 
nice Beachy, Hazel Ingram, Marceline Armstrong, Clara 
Lane, Anne Floreth, Mary Fowler, Lucille Rexroat and 
Alma Harmel. 

Miss Gleckler read for the Missionary Societies of 
Grace, Baptist and Congregational Churches, and for the 
Centenary Aid Society the first week in December. 

Great interest has been displayed in the Dramatic 
Club which is to be organized in a short time. Forty- 
seven girls have applied for membership. It has been 
decided that only five Academy students can be members 
of the club, being associate members with no power to 
vote or hold office. They will stand on equal footing 
with other members in the choice of casts for plays. 
When an Academy student enters college, she may be- 
come an active member of the club without further try- 
out. 

Page Twenty-two 



W^t CoIUge ^tettin^i 



-{^^'4 A U) i^ ^ 



During the month of November there have been a 
number of registrations, notably in Mrs. Day's violin class, 
and also in the development of the orchestra. The open- 
ing number of the Artists' Course, Mrs. Helen Brown 
Read's recital, occurred Nov. lOth, before a large and 
enthusiastic audience. 

The first of the faculty recitals was given by Miss 
Louise Miller on Monday evening, Dec. 7th. The faculty 
were heard in a number of out of town concerts and a 
concert in town. Miss Demuth and Miss Miller gave part 
of the program before the Virden Woman's Club on Nov. 
20th, and on Nov. 2 7th, Mrs. Hartmann, Mrs. Day, Miss 
Demuth and Mr. Stearns gave a program before the Wo- 
man's Club of Waverly. On Tuesday, Dec. 1st, Mrs. Day 
talked to the South End Woman's Club of her experiences 
in Russia, and on Friday evening, Dec. 4th, Mrs. Day and 
Mr. Stearns appeared before a large audience at the Chris- 
tian church in a complimentary concert given by the men 
of the church to the women of the church. 

On Sunday, Dec. 1 3th, will occur the second of this 
year's series of vesper concerts. An interesting feature of 
the program will be the singing of a number of old Christ- 
mas carols by the Madrigal Club. There will also be solos 
by Mrs. Hartmann, Miss Demuth and Mr. Stearns. 

Two student recitals have been given during the 
month of November. The programs were made up of 
students from all departments of the conservatory. These 
recitals are to be held every other Thursday at 4:15, and 
are considered a part of the musical education of every 
student. A great deal of benefit will be derived from these 
recitals if they are attended regularly. They are not open 

Page Twenty-three 




{E|)e CoIItge ^rtttinfifi 



to the public, but to students in all departments of the 
college. 

Much interesting work is expected to be done by the 
Academy Glee Club during the year. Elections for offi- 
cers brought out the following results: 

President — Anna Reavis. 

Vice-president — Julia Stuckey. 

Secretary — Frances Sconce. 

Treasurer — Ruth Marker. 

Director — Miss Demuth. 



ART NOTES. 

As the Christmas time draws near great interest is 
being taken in the arts and crafts department of the art 
studio. Consequently many pieces in china, leather and 
metal are being executed. 



BELLES LETTRES. 

One of the most enjoyable Belles Lettres meetings 
of the year was given when Miss Miller entertained us with 
a "Pianologue" — a romance with piano accompaniment. 

"A Mock Thanksgiving Dinner" was the subject for 
the Thanksgiving program. Everyone was given a menu 
card on which she was to write her guess for the names of 
the courses. The latter were represented by papers or 
talks on the appropriate topics, such as "Modes of Dress- 
ing," "Turkey," "The Sahara Desert," and others. All 
who guessed every course and those who were not as clev- 
er, were served with tea and wafers afterwards. 

Thanksgiving proved a jolly Belles Lettres reunion. 
What fun we did have listening to the experiences of "our 
teachers!" The Belles Lettres who were back were Hallie 
Clem, Letha Irwin, Freda Fenton, Esse Summers, Louise 
Gates and Marjorie Becker. 

Pag« TwcDt7-fonr 



Wi)t College (Greetings; 



Instead of our regular program on December 8th, we 
gave a presentation of "Council Fires," written by Audrey 
Berryman. 

The annual Christmas banquet M^as held in Belles 
Lettres Hall, Saturday evening, December 12th. The 
Hall and tables were attractively decorated in the society 
colors — black and gold — and yellow roses, the Belles Let- 
tres flower. After the dinner, an excellent informal pro- 
gram was given, consisting of readings, piano and vocal 
solos. In all there were about forty members and guests 
present, including several alumni. 

j^ 
THETA SIGMA. 

Theta Sigma was glad to welcome back one of her 
former members, Johnsie Rowland, who came to spend 
Thanksgiving and the week-end. 

On the Tuesday before Thanksgiving, Irene Merrill 
and Anne Floreth entertained Theta Sigma at a splendid 
Thanksgiving feast in the scoiety room. The many good 
things to eat were in evidence for only a short time, which 
is probably the reason we had such a good time. 

Some members of the society have recently enjoyed 
themselves very much at house parties. Grace Miles took 
Ethel Glaspie and Louise Harris home with her to spend 
Thanksgiving. The following Saturday, Helen McGhee, 
Mary Baldridge, May Bigger and Edna Robb went to Hel- 
en's home in White Hall to spend the week-end. 

PHI NU. 

The Phi Nu banquet was held at Colonial Inn on 
Tuesday evening, November 2 8th. This event, always 
dear to Phi Nus, was very enjoyable. After the banquet, 
Miss Crum introduced Miss Neville, our toastmistress for 
the evening. Miss Frazee, Miss Tombaugh, Miss Hess and 
Miss Rowe responded to toasts from Browning's Rabbi 
Ben Ezra. 



Page Twenty-five 




Wt^t CoUese Greetings: 




Phi Nu was glad to have back for this occasion Miss 
Frances Frazee, Miss Constance Loar, Miss Erma Elliott, 
Miss Dora McKee, Miss Ethlyn Wisegarver, and several 
of its old members in the city, Miss Lillian Davis, Miss 
Millicent Rowe and Miss Frances Boyd. 

New lights have recently been put in the hall, which 
add greatly to its attractiveness. 

The study of American writers is proving extremely 
interesting and helpful, as the programs are being worked 
up well. 

LAMBDA MU. 

Since Thanksgiving, the society has been greatly ap- 
preciative of the abundance of light made possible by the 
indirect lighting system, established in the hall at that date. 

The regular program of Dec. 2 was beautifully sup- 
plemented by a reading, "The White Swan," given by Miss 
Gleckler. 

In accordance with last year's suggestion, the final 
meeting before Christmas was observed as Old Members' 
Day. There were many letters and messages from old 
Lambdas — all touched with a wistfulness to be back at 
L W. C. After light refreshments, we lingered, held by 
that intangible feeling of "togetherness" newly stirred by 
these letters from absent friends, until the last dinner bell 
sounded. 

NEW BASIS OF MEMBERSHIP FOR THE Y. W. C. A? 

On November 4, the National Board of the Young 
Woman's Christian Association decided to recommend to 
the 1915 convention an amendment of the constitution, 
to be inserted under Article II., membership. This plan 
was worked out by the commission on the re-statement of 
the student basis and, because of various returns from the 

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Wf^t Collese ^rtttinQSi 




summer conferences and consultations with a commission 
working on the same thing for the Y. M. C. A., the form 
of the recommendation accepted by the National Board 
was a little different from that considered during the sum- 
mer. Now the proposed amendment stands thus: 

"Any student Young Women's Christian Association 
may be admitted to membership whose constitution em- 
bodies the following provisions: 

1. The Young Women's Christian Association of 

affirming the Christian faith in God, the Father; 

and in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord and Saviour; 
and in the Holy Spirit, the Revealer of truth and Source of 
power for life and service; according to the teacher of the 
Holy Scripture and the witness of the church, declares its 
purpose to be: 

1. To lead students to faith in God through Jesus 
Christ; 

2. To lead them into membership and service in the 
Christian Church; 

3. To promote their growth in Christian faith and 
character, especially through the study of the Bible; 

4. To influence them to devote themselves, in united 
effort with all Christians, to making the will of Christ 
effective in human society, and to extending the Kingdom 
of God throughout the world. 

II. Membership. 

Any woman of the institution may be a member of the 
Association provided: 

1. That she is in sympathy with the purpose of the 
Association; 

2. That she makes the following declaration; 

"It is my purpose to live as a true follower of the Lord 
Jesus Christ." 

III. Qualifications for leadership. 

1. All members of the cabinet commit themselves to 
furthering the purpose of the Association. 

Page Twenty-seven 




t!Dt)c College (Greetings; 




2a. Two-thirds of the cabinet members shall be 
members of churches which are entitled to representa- 
tion in the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in 
America, and only those delegates who are members of 
such churches shall be entitled to vote in conventions. 

Or 2b. A majority of the cabinet members, includ- 
ing the president, shall be members of churches which 
are entitled to representation in the Federal Council of the 
Churches of Christ in America, and only those delegates 
who are members of such churches shall be entitled to the 
vote of conventions. 

This amendment requires for adoption a two-thirds 
affirmative vote in the 191 5 convention and also in the 
national convention of 1918. 

Y. W. C. A. NOTES. 

The information meeting held Nov. 29 was interest- 
ing and furnished some knowledge that every member 
should possess. Miss Want showed by diagram the con- 
nections between the world movement, the national, the 
district and the work of our own association. The splen- 
did system is one to be commended to any great firm or 
company. 

The student volunteers had charge of the meeting Dec. 
6th. Ora Theobald led the meeting. Rachel Morris 
spoke on the opportunities in foreign fields and the re- 
sponsibility students owe to this work. Marie Miller gave 
the history of the volunteer movement and its splendid 
growth. Miss Chassel made the appeal to the students 
to go out into the foreign field. The meeting was well 
conducted and the movement and its high aims well 
presented. 

The Christmas service held on Dec. I3th was an es- 
pecially interesting one. Miss Gleckler delighted us by 
reading Grace E. Richmond's "On Christmas Day in the 

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Wbt CoU$ge ^reetinstf 



Morning." Several special music numbers helped to 
make the spirit of the day a true Christmas one. 

The bazaar held December 10th proved very success- 
ful. The display of pretty things pleased the purchasers 
so much that the late arrivals had a difficult time to find 
anything to buy. The members of the Association have 
contributed a sufficient amount to buy the boots to be 
worn by the children of the open air school. Enough 
money was left after buying the forty pairs of boots for 
sixteen pairs of mittens. The interest shown in this school 
will surely help to make it a success. 

The Thanksgiving baskets afforded the usual pleasure 
both to the givers and receivers. The faculty and girls 
divided into groups of twenty, and fifteen baskets were 
sent out to needy families. 

The Service Circle is studying Dr. Henderson's ''Social 
Duties" at its monthly meetings under the direction of 
Miss Jennie Anderson. The discussions have proven so 
interesting that the hour allotted to the class has been en- 
tirely too short. 

Within a month three conventions will have been held 
which are of interest to members of the Y. W. C. A. In 
Chicago December 8-12, an occupational convention was 
held which was of especial interest to Juniors and Seniors 
who are considering the secretaryship as their life work. 
A national Y. W. C. A. convention is to be held at Lake 
Forest January 1-3 to consider the amendment to the con- 
stitution concerning the membership basis. We are to 
have one or two delegates at this convention. The stu- 
dent volunteer movement of the state of Illinois holds its 
convention in Decatur, January 7, 8, and 9th. As De- 
catur is so near to us, there will be in all probability sev- 
eral go from our school to this convention which, beyond 
a doubt, will be exceedingly interesting. 

Page Twentj-nine 




Wtft College (dreetinss; 




CALENDAR. 

Sept. 16 — First Chapel. 

Sept. 16-19 — Y. W. C. A. reception to new girls. 

Sept. 20 — First Sunday. Old girls call on new girls. 

Sept. 21 — Phi Nu picnic at Gravel Springs. 

Lambda Mu breakfast at Nichols Park. 

Sept. 25 — Sophomore "Pep" day — Mantanzas an- 
nouncement. 

Sept. 26 — College Sing. Sophomore contest. 

Sept. 2 7 — Y. W. C. A. recognition service. 

Sept. 28 — Belles Lettres breakfast. Theta Sigma 
breakfast. 

Oct. 3 — Off for Matanzas. 

Oct. 5 — Freshman picnic. 

Oct. 8 — Athletic meeting at Chapel hour. 

Oct. 9-Y. W. C. A. Tag day. 

Oct. 10 — Athletic Association day. 

Oct. 12 — Sophomore-Freshman hare and hound 
chase — postponed. 

Oct. 15 — Founders' day. 

Oct. 17 — Y. W. Carnival. 

Oct. 19 — Junior reception to Freshmen. 

Oct. 29 College Council withdrew its charter. 

Freshman stunt. 
Oct. 30 Charter of the Student Association read by Dr. 

Marker in chapel. 
Oct. 31 Hallowe'en party given by the college specials. 
Nov. 1 Miss Corbett, Y. W. C. A. Secretary, had 

charge of Association meeting. 
Vesper services. 
Nov. 3 Gifts amounting to $11,000 for endowment 

were announced. 
Nov. 4 Y. W. C. A. cabinet picnic at Gravel Springs. 
Nov. 7 Reception for home economics department. 
Nov. 8 Miss Olmsted, visiting nurse of the city told 

Association of her work. 

Page Thirty 




Wbt College Greetings; 




Nov. 10 Mrs. Helen Brown Read's voice recital. 

Constitution of the Athletic Association was 
was adopted and a vote was taken to build 
a hard tennis court. 
Nov. 12 Constitution of the Student Association was 

adopted. 
Nov. 14 Lambda Mu held informal reception at Colon- 
ial Inn. 
Miss Hull entertained the Freshmen. 
Nov. 16 Miss Anderson entertained third floor Harker 
at tea. 
First meeting of the German Club. 
Nov. 18 Senior dinner held in the Cookerei. 

Discussing of culture by the upper-classes. 

Election of Student Association officers. 

Sophs brought out their fine new banner for 
the first time. 

Taffy pull for third floor Harker. 

Miss Knopf's old table had waffle breakfast 
at the Peacock Inn. 

Special program in German Club. 
Nov. 25 Miss Jennie Anderson entertained the Juniors. 

Taking of Thanksgiving baskets. 

Old girls arriving. 

Thanksgiving. 

Installation of Student Association officers. 

Phi Nu anual banquet at Colonial Inn. 

Dr. Harker talked in Sunday morning chapel. 

Miss McLaughlin entertained the Sophomores. 

Miss McLaughlin entertained the Sophomores. 

Home economic's stunt. 

Town girls' market. 

Senior-Junior banquet at Colonial Inn. 
Dec. 6 Student volunteer meeting in Christian associa- 
tion. 
Dec. 7 Miss Miller's recital. 

Page Thirty-one 



Nov. 


19 


and 


20 


Nov. 


19 


Nov, 


21 


Nov. 


23 



Nov. 


26 


Nov. 


28 


Nov. 


29 


Nov. 


30 


Nov. 


30 


Dec. 


3 


Dec. 


5 




die College ^^reetingsi 




Dec. 9 Howard Grigg's lectures. 

Dec. 10 Y. W. C. A. bazaar. 

Dec. 1 1 Miss Anderson ententained the Seniors. 

Dec. 12 Belle Lettres banquet. 

Dec. 14 Trunks out in the halls. 

Dec. 1 7 After 4 :1 5 no more classes until the 5th of Jan- 
uary. 

JOKES. 

M. B. in Bacteriology — "Was Hippocrates the father 
of Disease?" 

E. P. — "Why, I thought Hippocrates was a myth." 

M. T. at Miss Robinson's table — "What is fencing? 
Is it what 1 see them doing out on the campus, jumping 
over fences? " 

There are several Ruths in the Junior class: Ruth 
Want, after passing Ruth Taylor on the stairs — "Hello, 
Ruth!" 

Ruth T. — "Oh, hello, I thought you were speaking 
to Ruth Patton." 

Ruth P., over the banister — "Oh, hello, Ruth!" 

"Hello, Ruth!" chimed Ruth Harper from the eleva- 
tor. 

At the table: G. R. (teasing her younger sister) — 
"You are massive — " 

A. R. (after a thoughtful search to find a suitable 
word) — "Well, you are corporal." 

Seraphine — "Homer and Charon were ancient Greek 
poets." 

A. M. M. — "I like everything about sewing except the 
grafting." 

M. H. coming into the room finds her room mate 
shedding copious tears — "Why, what is the trouble?" 
R. W. — "I can't decide which is sadder: 'She died 



Page Thirty-two 



Wt^t College Greetings! 



like a wseet little, innocent bird,' or 'She drooped like a 
lily and died." 

A. M. M. — "Did Darwin say that the descendants of 
man are monkeys? " 

H. K. — "Miss A., when a leaf curls up, it curls up, 
doesn't it?" 

W. B., in physics — "A circle has six diameters." 

The angles at which the Senior's caps are put on are 
so varied that the row in chapel might be compared to a 
line of trenches as modern war methods plan them. 

M. B. — "The sycamore is a maple tree." 

R. W. — "This calendar says 1914, next year it will be 
1915." 

After chemistry exam. — X — "Miss McL uses a 

red pencil and it makes your mistakes stand out so plainly. 
I'm giad Miss A uses a blue one." 

Y. — "O yes, 1 always feel a blue one is in much better 
taste." 

Mr. X to Miss Y of the faculty — "Look at that woman 
-still Miss at her age!" 



Miss Y bristling — "Why not at that age? " 
Mr. X., trying to smooth it over — "Well, I guess the 
poor thing must have taught school when she was young." 

LOCALS. 

There have been a number of guests during the last 
month. Grace Miles' mother and Gertrude Wilson's sis- 
ter each spent a week-end in the building. Eleanor Hen- 
derson and Helen Thomas have visited with friends. Hallie 
Clem, Letta Irwin and Esse Somers spent Thanksgiving at 
the college. 

The Seniors were delightfully entertained by Miss 
Mary Anderson on Friday, Dec. 11. 

Page Thirty-three 



Wbt CoUege ^reettngst 




The memoers of the class in sociology are going to 
enter the essay contest open to students of Methodist 
schools, as offered by the Temperance Society of the 
Methodist church. The papers are to be written on the 
"Social Welfare Phase" of the anti-liquor problem and 
must be sent to the office in Topeka, Kansas, not later 
than March 1st. Prizes of fifty, thirty and twenty dollars 
are offered. 

ALUMNAE NOTES. 

There were enough of the class of 1914 at the col- 
lege during Thanksgiving to have a party at Miss John- 
ston's table. All sorts of experiences were talked over, 
which were many and varied. Those present were Hallie 
Clem, Letta Irwin and Erma Lytle Elliott. 

We wish more of our alumnae would respond with 
subscriptions, material and such sentiments as we have 
from a few. 

"I enjoyed the alumnae notes so much, I should think 
everyone would want the paper." — Rena Crum Sinclair, 
'08. 

"Thanks for sending out the first number. I think 
the plan for a special alumnae editor should bring good 
results." — Susan Rebhan, '05. 

The following "Classical Notes" were brought in at 
Thanksgiving by visiting alumnae: 

"My Latin teacher is Miss C. They say Latin is a 
dead language and 1 wish it was buried." (Extract from a 
theme.) 

"Miss L, do you really advise me to take Latin? 
They say it is getting to be such a dead language, it isn't 
even spoken in Europe much now." 

"I just want to know this: When you talk Latin, do 
you have to talk it in Enlgish or Latin? " 

"I never thought I'd have to learn to pronounce Lat- 
in. I always thought it was a dumb language." 

Page Thirty-four 




tlDije CoUege (greetings; 



EXCHANGES. 

The keynote of this months' exchanges is College 
Spirit. Some papers labor with their student body for not 
giving the football team enthusiastic support, others read 
lectures on '"-don't-careness" about oratorical contests, 
and still others stress true college spirit as shown in good, 
hard, daily grinding. Perhaps the first two ways of mani- 
festing college spirit are employed more than the third, no 
doubt because lack of them is so much more common. At 
any rate, loyalty and pep are the watchwords of all good 
college children. 

The Exponent contains much good literary material, 
is rich in really funny jokes, with seeable points, but why 
is not more life put into it by giving the atmosphere of 
busy, bustling college activities ? 

The Sopohmores did a good job when they got their 
chance at the Pegasus. Their writeups on "do's" are clev- 
er; the rules for Freshmen boys are all-embracing and 
quite original, in spelling, at least, is the account of the 
Sophomore-Senior thankful party. 

The Blackburnian is strong on newsy bits and in 
campus jokes. 

St. Mary's Chimes contains a number of poems, some- 
thing that so many of us find hard to get. 

"An optimist is a man who makes lemonade out of 
the lemons which are handed him." 



SENIOR-JUNIOR BANQUET. 

The Senior-Junior banquet was held at the Colonial 
Inn on Saturday night, December 5th. Though the night 
was rainy, everyone seemed in good spirits, some 
Seniors and one faculty member even going out ahead of 
time. A short program consisting of a song by May Big- 
ger and a one-act farce — "The Other Woman," by 
Corinne Hughes and Alma Harmel was much enjoyed by 

Page Thirty-five 




Wiit College 4lreeting:s( 



all. The reading of the small diplomas found on each 
place card caused a great deal of amusement at the ban- 
quet table. 

SOPHOMORE NOTES. 

Miss McLaughlin entertained the Sophomores with a 
jolly informal party in the Expression Studio, the Monday 
after Thanksgiving. Aren't you all curious to know 
what we did? Just watch us at the essay contest and 
you will find out. 

The society halls, on "stunt" night, November 19, 
were the scene of a very solemn occasion — the presenta- 
tion of our 1917 banner. The opening number of the 
program was an oration, "The Helvetians Across the 
Rhine," by Helen Ost. Then, preceded by a short ad- 
dress by the president, the Juniors were presented with 
their 1916 banner. Last, came the unveiling of our own 
red and white "1917," accompanied by a rousing class 
song. 

Alice Tombaugh has been chosen Sophomore repre- 
sentative on the executive board of the Students' Asso- 
ciation. 

The Sophomore class sends best wishes for a merry 
Christmas and a happy new year to every one at the col- 
lege and to all our members who are not back this year. 

WHATS IN A NAME? 

If you don't know Dutch, 

It won't matter mutch; 

At our market you can tutch, 

For a little, pies and sutch. 
"3:15 Saturday, Dec. 5" appeared in startling letters 
on the bulletin board one day. With great anticipation 
each girl "saved up her pennies" for the town girls mar- 
ket. When the day came the Miss bought a Yorkshire 
pudding in the cookerel, Madamoiselle bought some cro- 

Page Thirty-six 




tE'fit College <{|reeting£i 



quettes in the cusine and Fraulein bought a Dutch mixture 
in the cookerei. Strange to say, however, they all went 
to the same cozy kitchen, chose their dainties from the 
same store, bought them from the same bunch of beaming 
town girls, enjoyed them to the same (fullest) extent, re- 
marked about the same market and the same cooks. 
Then the same town girls remarked about the same appe- 
tites and the success of the same sale. 

^^ 

EGYPTIAN CLUB. 

On Monday, November 2 3, the Egyptian Club was 
organized by the girls who live south of East St. Louis. 
There are about fifteen members, all of whom are very 
enthusiastic about the club and are expecting many good 
times this winter. The officers elected are: Elaine 
Buhrman, President; Nora Alexander, Vice-President; 
Jessie Clem, Secretary and Treasurer. 

EDWARD HOWARD GRIGGS LECTURES. 

The second number of the artists' course was hailed 
with enthusiasm. Mr. Griggs, who gave us two splendid 
lectures last year, again delighted us on Wednesday, Dec. 
9, with two more. In the afternoon his subject was "Flor- 
ence, the Heart of the Rennaisance," in which he gave a 
vivid description of the monuments of that period which 
are still preserved in Florence. "The New Social Ideal," 
the subject of the evening, was one of intense interest to 
all, but especially to those of the Sociology, Bible and 
English classes. 



Page Thirty-seven 



GARMENTS FOR YOUNG WOMEN! 

The newest and most popular fashions of the day 
reach our show room first — straight from the work- 
rooms of the New York workers. Attractive styles, 
for the young women, especially, are shown here in 
profusion. 



Coats 
Waists 



Suits 
Skirts 



Dresses 
Lingerie 



1^. Ji >l|i|^ia|l^}^, L,lL, ^S< 

' " # •# ^ ^ ^-S^Ssms^ «!SSSSS^ ««SSSSSsi ^S^SSSS^ m\viSiS^ %cSS--'%iSS>i 

LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 



COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

Large assortment of footwear 
for every occasion. 

Dress, Street and Bed-room 
Footwear 

11 O IP IP E K. S' 
We Repair Shoes 




J. A. OBERMEYER 



HARRY P. OBERMEYER 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

Pennants. Stationery, Tennis Goods, Drug-s, School 

Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory 

Books and Photo Albums 

"PLEASED customers"— OUR MOTTO 

Goods Delivered 



I Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St. and Square 

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349 East State Street 



Studio: Southwest Corner Square 

Otto Speith 

IPboto portraiture 



Official Catalogue 

of Pictures Accepted 
in the Exhibit of 

P. A. OF A. 

827 Mary Carnell Pblladelphia, Pa. 

SOS— 309 B. E. Dot; HaUle Creek. Mlcb. 

31^— Sl» H. S. Holland Charleston. S. C 

51—52 The Daniel Studio Jackson, Miss. 

36—37 J. B. Schriever Scranton, Pa. 

33 J. B. Van De Sande New Smyrna, Fla. 

28—29 Carl Schlotzhouer Lancaster, Pa, 

25 S. H. WlUard Corona, Cal. 

21 The Tomllnson Studio Trenton, N.J. 

19—20—21 The Brown's Studio.. New Bedford, Mass. 

4—5—6 Fred H. Reed Wichita, Kan. 

1—3 Otto Spleth JacksonvlUe, IlL 

218 — ^219 Louis Dworshak '^^ 

-216 S. L. Fowler 



that we I 
Hundred 

Very often we a. 
our tiienibership list 
for a concession and tht 
important that wc have a i. 
The first thing that the Ph 
phers' Association of Ai 
needs is a large membership, 
we can get anything we want 
is within reason. 

ARE YOU GOING TO 
YOUR PART? 



Picture Exhibit. | 

The Picture E.xhibit at the Con- | 

vention was a grand success both | 

in the number of prints submitted I 

and in the superiority of the <vork | 

displayed. There were 550 prints I 

submitted, out of which there were | 

197 whicli rated liigh enough to be | 

placed in the accepted class. I 



Clipping.-^ cif th Official Catalogue of our standing in Photographers! 
Association of America i 



COTRELL & LEONARD 

ALBANY, N. Y. 




MAKERS OF 
CAPS 

(;OWNS and 
MOODS 



lo tne Auiericaii Colleges and Univer- 
sities from the.\t]anlics to the Pacific 
Class contracts a specialty: 



WE SELL SERVICE! 

We do not run an ordinary type-setting 

plant— 

We leave that to the Other Fellow. 

Whet; you have a job that requires 

quick action, send it to the only 

molern equipped shop in the citv. 

iVlodern Machinery and the Ability to Use It 

The Roach Press 

308 East State Street 



FLO RET H CO. 

Leaders in Mil inery, Coat>, 

Suits and all youi Dry 

Go^ds needs 

Always lowest possible prices 
don't FORGET US 



Coover& Shrevei 

Have a complete line of 

D ugs, Koda..s, Perfumes, 
Staiionery and Holiday Gifts| 

We do Developing- & Printingfj 

East and West Side Square 



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itest in JEWELRY, 




CUT GLASS and 


Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say 


SILVERWARE 


We can furnish your 


AT 


Shoes and Party Slippers 


Russell & Lyon's 

Oldest Established Jewelers 
in Central Illinois 


in the populur styles, 

leath. :rs, and 

fabrics 


Both Phones 96 





PHOTOGRAPHER 

Member State and National Associations 



cCULLOUGH STUDIO 



EAST SIDE SQUARE 



"The mistletoe hung in the castle hall, 

The holly branch shone on the old oak wall." 

— Bayly. 



(irapfjic 
Concern 



printers;, Sj^uhlii^ttsi, ^tationerji 



ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



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For those who discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to 
please the students who come to our city. We select only the 
best materials and prepare them with skilful! loving care. 

Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 
Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 
College functions. 

Vickery Sc Merrigan 



CSATERER^ 



227 W. State St. 



Both Phones 309 




i 
1 


SAFEST PLACE TO TRADE 


Brady Bros. 


r 


f|ILLERBY'§ 

DRY GOODS STORE 


Everything- in Hardv^are, 
House-furnishing-s and Paini 


:s| 

1 


West Side Square 


45-47 South Side Square 




SEE 


'<The Home of the Crispette" 


1 
1 


Bonansinga 


The Sanitary Pop-corn 


1 


For Fancy Fruit and 

Confectionery 


and Crispette Shop 

Pop-corn that melts in your moutti 
Roasted and Salted Peanuts 


s 

i 
1 
1 

r 
1 

i 


72 East Srde Square 


East State Street 





C» V* Frankcnbcrg 

Ladies' and Gents' Tailoring 

Cleaning, Altering, 

Repairing 

Improved Machinery, 

Best Work 
315 Bast State Street 



Established 1890 




jACKiiOAJViLLE , fiJm 



Low Prices Square Dealing f 
Keep us busy \ 



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flDuIIenix & Ibamilton 

Confectioners 



CLEANLINESS 



SERVICE 



QUALITY 

Creams, Ices, Frappes, Sundaes, Sodas, Parfaits, 

Mousses and all Hot Drioks 

Home-made Candies and Salted Nuts 

The Store of Merit 

Phones 70 216 East State Street 



Why pay more for no more? 

Let us sell you SHOES 

It means more spending money 
for you 

We cater to your wants 

A. SMITH 

The Popular Price East State Street 
Shoe Man 

WE REPAIR SHOES 



1. M. BUNCE & Co. 



IPrintins 



211 East Morgan Street 



Shepherds at the grange, 

Where the Babe was born, 

Sang, with many a change, 

Christmas carols until morn. 

Let us by the fire 

Ever higher. 

Sing them till the night expire! 

— Longfellow. 



[HARRY HOFFMAN FLORAL CO. 

I Designs, Cut Flowers, 

I Plants 

I Southwest Corner Square 

I Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

I Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

I Greenhouses, Bell 775 



JAS. McGINNIS & CO 

East Side Square 

flUIHIUUIUUIUUIIIMUUIIIUIUllUIIIIUIIIIIIUIIIIUHUniHIIIIIIUmillllUIIHHIimilllllUIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIWIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 



McGINNIS' 

The Young Ladies' Shoe Store 

We carry a full line of Evening Slipper 
in all colors. 

If it's new, we have it 



Want 

Cut flowers 

FROM 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

Both Phones 




You will find a complete line of 

FANCY GROCERIES 

at 

Walker's Grocery 

Home Cooking: a Specialty 
Both Phones 205 E. Morgan Stree- 



Job Printing 

Of All Kinds 

John K* Long 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 



213 West Morgan Street 
Illinois Phone 400 



I heard the bells on Christmas Day, 

Their old, familiar carols play, 

And wild and sweet 

The words repeat 

Of peace on earth, good will to men ! 

— Longfellow. 



I Dorwan MUi 

I ALL, KINDS OF 

[FRESH and SALT MEATS 
I FISH, POULTRY, Etc. 



KODAK FINISHING 

Vulcan Roll Films 

Cameras from $2.00 up 
Everything- strictly first class 

Vail & Vail 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. 



IBoth phones 196 230 W. State St. 

E 
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THE STATIONERY STORE THAT SERVES 



OUR MOTTO; 

Service and 

Satisfaction 



Btbcrton's 



OUR MOTTO: 
Service and 

Satisfaction 



I Headquarters for 

I STATIONERY, POST CARDS, BOOKS, MAGAZINES, 

I PENNANTS, NOVELTIES, CAMERAS AND 

I PHOTO SUPPLIES 

j LEATHER GOODS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 

I Table Runners, Matts, Cushions and Piano Scarfs 

I Expert Developing and Finishing 

I Open Days and Nights until 9:00 P. M. 

I Illinois Phone 450 

I 59 Southeast Corner Square Jacksonville, Illinois 



"As many mince pies as you taste at Christmas, so 
many happy months will you have." — An old English 
saying. 



I date Bat5 

I ant) annex for ILaDies 

I 221-223 Hast State Street 
I Illinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Art Needle Work 
and Millinery 

211 West state street 



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Phones 800 

ROBERTS BROS. 

DRUGS AND GROCERIES 

We guarantee every purchase 

and delivery or money 

back 

ROBERTS BROS. 

29 Soath Side Square Phones 800 



S. S. Kresge Co.| 

5c & IOC Store I 

A popular place for College | 
Girls I 



The Store tor 



DRESS GOODS and SILKS 




DRY GOODS STORE 



Kodak Shop 



A. H. Atherton & Son = 



Under Farrell's Bank 



We Develop and Print Promptly | 



Blow, bugles of battle, the marches of peace; 
East, West, North and South let the long quarrel cease! 
Sing of glory to God and of good will to man. 
Sing the song of great joy that the angels began, 

— Whittier. 



E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

Proprietor of 

City Steam Dye Works 

Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

Waists and Dresses 

a Specialty 



Ideal Bread 

is butter 
so are the Cakes 



I 330 Bast State St Jacksonville, 111. 

I Illinois Phone 388 

'^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiMiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin Hill iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin. 



Visit 
SCHRAM'S 

Jewelry Store 

We have Qood-looking and good-wearing goods 
Will be pleased to show them 



All the Faculty, Students and Frien Is 
of the College should have a Checking 
or Savings Account with 

F. G. FARRELL & CO. 

BANKERS 

F. E. Farrell, President 

E. E. Crabtree, Vice-President 

H. H. Potter, Cashier 

M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier 



T AYLOR'S 

Grocery 

A good place to trade 
221 West State Street 



The time draws near the birth of Christ, 
The moon is hid! the night is still; 
The Christmas bells from hill to hill 

Answer each other in the mist. 

— Tennyson. 

At Christmas play, and make good cheer, 
For Christmas comes but once a year. 

— Tusser. 



College Printing Specialists 

Year Books College Calendars 

Every Kind of Printing and Binding 
WRITE us 

Pantagraph Printing and Stationery Co» 

BLOOMINGTON, ILUNOIS 



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mill niMiriiiMiiiiiiininiiMiiiiiiinnillllMniliUllHllllliiliiiiilllllinHlliiiiiliiniMMnninniMiiiiiniinniuiiiiiniiiiinniiniiiniinininniiinniiinMiMMMniiiMiiniiii^ 



The Latest in 

College Jewelry, Society 

Stationery, Bracelet 

Watches, Silver and 

Cut Glass 



AT 



BASSETT'S 



21 South Side Square 



C. J. Deppe & Co. 

Known for "Ready-TO- 

wear" and Popular 

Priced Dry Goods 



Pibpenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 



HERE TO PLEASE 




Brothers 






Jacksonville's foremost Store for Men I 



Candies 
Cookies 
Sandwiches 
Groceries Ca 
School S 


Pop 
lifornia 
uppiies 


Cakes 

Pies 

on Ice 

Fruits 


and Specialties for Women 

Mannish Sweaters 

Mackinaw Coats, KnittedToques 

Mannish Rain Coats and Hats 

Trunks and Handbags 



MoIIenbrock & McCullough 



SUCCESSORS TO 



McDougall's Studio 



234i West State Street 



Illinois Phone 808 



Ladies* Late Style Furs 



ARE SOLD BY 



Frank Byrns 



Hat 
Store 



Cherry's Livery | 

Finest Light and Heavy | 

Livery | 

Lowest Rates | 

235-237, 302-304 306 North Main Stieet| 



MiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiMiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiHnniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiHiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiHiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Cafe 



Confectionary 



(beacock ITnn 



Cateringf 



Soda 



Candies 



Len G. Magill 



Printer 



East State Street 111. Phone 418 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



Be merry all, be merry all, 
With holly dress the festive hall; 
Prepare the song, the feast, the ball, 
To welcome Merry Christmas! 

— W. R. Spencer. 



I SHEET MUSIC, MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 

I TALKINC; MACHINES, RECORDS 

I AND SUPPLIES 

I 19 SOUTH SIDE PUBUC SQUARE 

'lllllllllllllllUIUIHMIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMUIIUIIIIIIIIUIIIUIIIIinilllllUIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIHIIIIIIUIIIIIIIUIUIIUUIUIMIIIIIIIIUlU^ 



for the home 



ANDRE & ANDRE 



for the home i 



STUDENTS 

Headquarters for Room Furnishings 

The Best Goods at the Price, no matter what the Price 

ANDRE & ANDRE 



TME GIFT 
STORE 



THE GIFT 
STORE 



Dr. Albyn Lincoln Adams 
OCCULIST AND AURIST 

to the State School for the Blind 
323 West State Street 

Practice limited to diseases of the 
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

Both Telephones 



DR. ALPHA B. APPLEBEEl 
Dentist 

326 West State St. 



5 FOR YOUR DEN 5 

Beautiful College Pennants 

YALE AND HARVARD 
Each 9in. x 24in. 

PRINCETON, CORNELL, 
MICHIGAN 
Each 7in. x 2iin. 

4— PENNANTS, Size 12x30—4 

Any Leading Colleges of 

Your Selection 

All of oar best quality, in their 
proper colors, with colored emblems. 

Either assortment, for limited time, 
I sent postpaid for 50 cents and five 
stamps to cover shipping costs. 

Write us for prices before placing 
orders for felt novelties of all kinds. 

The Gem City Novelty Co. 

2420 Bittner Street 
Dayton, Ohio 

HHUaillUIIUIUUIIIIItouiu. .•..lUllillUlullUIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



We will pipe your house for 

GAS 

or wire it for 

ELECTRICITY 

at cost 
Jacksonville l^ailway & 

Light Company 

Two years to pay 224 S. Main St. 



DR. A. C. KINGSLEY 
dentist 

409 Ayers National Bank Bldg. 
Both Phones 760 

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COLLEGE GIRLS: 

See our Motor Coats, Mackinaws and Sweaters 
Also Ladies' Holeproof Hosiery 

LUKEMArS[ BROTHERS 
Girls; Patronize Our Advertisers 



Ayers National Bank 

Founded 1852 



Capital 
^^200,000 

Surplus 
^^0,000 

Deposits 
^2,000,000 




United States] 
Depository 

Postal Savings 
Depository 

Member of 

Federal 

Reserve Brnk 



LADIES' DEPARiMENT 
Special Window for Ladies 
Ladies' Waiting Room 
We make a feature of Ladies' Accounts, and have 
provided facilities for their exclusive use 

OFFICERS 
M. F. Dunlap, President O. F. Buffe, Cashier 

Andrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 

R. M. Hockenhull. Vice President H. C. Clement, Asst Cashier 

Chas. B. Graff, Vice President W. G. Goebel, Asst. Cashier 

H. J. Rodgers, Vice President H. K. Chenoweth, Asst. Cashier 

Arthur Vannier, Assistant Cashier 
DIRECTORS 
Owen P. Thompson 
Edward F. Goltra 
John W. Leach 



George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhull 
M. F. Dunlap 



Harry M. Capps 
O. F. Buffe 
Andrew Russel 



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Music Hall 

Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 

Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 



College of LiberalArts 
College ot Music 
S.'riool of Fine Arts 
School of Expression 
School of Home Economics 

A Standard College — 
Regular college and academy courses 
leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 
inently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located 
in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 
dignified, old college town, noted for 
its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking for a good college. 

Call or address, Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, 111. 




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tKi)e Collese (greetingg 

^ The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 
€| Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the fifteenth of each month. 

€j] Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
€11 Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 

Contents 

Editorial 3 

The Wind and the Sea 6 

Exhibition of American Paintings 8 

Easter Dates 10 

The Area of College Attendance . 11 

To 89 12 

Washington Party 12 

Dramatic Club 13 

Day of Prayer 15 

February the Eighteenth 16 

Signs of Spring 16 

Antigone , 17 

College Calendar 17 

Freshman Organization 18 

Expression Notes 18 

Y. W. C. A. Notes 19, 

Society Notes 20 

Locals.. 23 

Aluranse Notes 24 

Exchanges 25 

Thk 

Graphic Arts 

Concern 





14 



"The winter is over and gone at last, 

The days of snow and cold are past, 
Over the fields the flowers appear, 
It is the Spirits' voice we hear. 
The singing of birds, 
A warbling band, 
The voice of truth is heard in our land." 

— Bishop Coxe. 



"The sun is bright — the air is clear, 
The darting swallows soar and sing. 

And from the stately elms I hear. 
The blue bird prophesying Spring" 

— Longfellow. 




%H I 




ZEbe College (3reetinG6 



Vol. XVIII Jacksonville, 111., March, 1915 No. 6 



Faculty Advisor — Miss Mary Anderson. 

Editor-in-Chief — Helena Munson. 

Associate and Alumnae Editor — Winifred Burmeister. 

Assistant Editors — Helen McGhee, Elaine Buhrman. 

Art Editor — Dorothy Stevens. 

Business Manager — Audrey Berryman. 

Assistant Business Managers — Alma Harmel, Mary Harrison. 



EDITORIAL. 

How many agree with me that complaining has be- 
come a chronic disease among the students? Construc- 
tive criticism is a good thing, but where we are always 
finding fault with every situation and fail to take account 
of the good, is it not time a check came? If we would 
stop talking about what is the trouble and actually do 
something, going about our daily life with vim, vigor, and 
cheerfulness, troubles would vanish like lightning. Let 
us apply the cure of cheerful thoughts! 

There's always an element of uncertainty in any new 
undertaking. When the staff decided to open a short 
story contest the results could not be seen. We had hoped 
to be showered with good short stories, as we felt confi- 
dent that the material lay dormant among the girls. We 
still feel confident that the ability is there as the five 
stories which were handed in indicate. However, we were 
disappointed in the slight response. We know that many 
others considered writing, but evidently did not carry out 
their good intentions before the settled date. (There is 
material enough in that thought for a lengthy editorial. 
How soon one acquires the habit!) We are also disap- 

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Cfje College ^vtttixiQS 



pointed in the decision which had to be made. The judges, 
a faculty committee of three heads of departments, gave 
the returns that the stories did not come up to a high 
enough standard to merit the prizes. We hope that this 
decision will not discourage the writing of many stories 
another year, but will mean the setting of a standard which 
will be an honor well worth striving for. 

We are sorry that so many mistakes were made in the 
printing of our first German story last month. They were 
due to the printer's ignorance of German and to a failure 
to re-read the proof. We feel confident that our readers 
were able to see beyond the errors the true charm of the 
story. 

During the last month we were glad to receive an ar- 
ticle from Letta Irwin of class 1914, who is now teaching 
English at Hume, 111. She has realized how important it 
is for an underclassman to plan early in her college life a 
well correlated course which will enable her to teach most 
efficiently her chosen subject after graduation. Miss Irwin 
speaks of the subjects necessary for an English course, es- 
pecially. She enumerates a number of English courses 
which she considers as necessary and advises one to have 
a good foundation in at least one foreign language and to 
take as much Bible as possible. Such correlation of sub- 
jects toward a definite end is something which many of us 
need, not in English alone but in any line. Interest shown 
by the alumnae is most encouraging and we solicit ma- 
terial from them at all times. We regret that at present, 
because of lack of space, we are unable to print Miss Ir- 
win's article. 

As an organ of the college and student body, the 
Greetings wants to step into line with the Students' Boost- 
er Club for 1 00 Freshmen next year. Our paper now goes 
into at least two dozen High Schools and through its col- 
umns many High School girls can be reached. If you feel 
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1 



that the paper in your High School would be effective drop 
the address in the Greetings box. During the next few 
months the heartiest co-operation of all students can make 
our paper a live wire v/hich will draw attention to the 
school. Don't allow any brilliant thought to go to waste. 
If you feel that you cannot write well enough, pass your 
suggestion along, so that someone else can make use of 
it. From now on space will be left open for student edi- 
torials. They need not all be of the same tenor; there are 
many sides to the question. If you've been waiting to 
show your "pep," now you have your chance. 

A hundred Freshmen for September, nineteen hundred 
fifteen, is our watch word for the coming months. But 
these hundred Freshmen will not come without some in- 
formation of the value of our college. How are we to aid 
in giving one hundred girls this information? Do we real- 
ize that we should be and are responsible for many of 
these new students? Do we fully comprehend what in- 
fluence our interest and help will have upon a girl decid- 
ing those most important questions, "Where shall the next 
four years of my life be spent? What characteristics do 
I wish strengthened and which subdued during the next 
four years; and in what place can I find that help? " 

Are we loyal daughters of I. W. C, expressing our 
loyalty to our college by showing to her those better char- 
acteristics that she is seeking? Do we ever lose an oppor- 
tunity to express by our actions and ideals the best for 
which our college stands, or the opportunity to speak out 
energetically, loyally, lovingly, for her? 

If we ask ourselves these questions we find that we 
are missing many opportunities of advertising our college. 
Dr. Harker has often remarked that the only difference 
between himself and a travelling man is that the travelling 
man carries his goods with him and he can not. But Dr. 
Harker's samples are spread far and wide. Are we the 
kind of samples that draw trade? Are we strong student 
magnets? Before we can impress any one else with the 

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value of our college, and of the love we have for her, we 
must first of all be ourselves intensely loyal. Loyal not 
in singing her songs the loudest, nor in making the most 
touching speeches in mass meetings, but in our every day 
life, seeing the best in I. W. C. and loving her for what 
she does for us. We must be loyal to her as an institution. 
We must love her when all the present girls and faculty 
are gone, and only the dear old walls of the Woman's 
College remain the same. Without this true loyalty we 
are useless as student magnets. 

Let us as a student body become magnetized to draw 
to the Illinois Woman's College next year one hundred 
Freshmen girls! — A Freshman. 



THE WIND AND THE SEA. 

Many years ago, indeed centuries ago, when only fair- 
ies and elves wandered thru the worlds, everything was 
real and only Joy and Happiness found a welcoming heart. 

Near the Sea in a rocky cavern, a beautiful nymph 
lived, loved by all the other fairies and nymphs. The 
flowers loved her, also, and lifted their lovely faces from 
her barren threshold and bloomed their prettiest for her. 
Every morning when she awoke, she gathered fruit from 
the trees and seeds from the meadows to feed the Golden 
Fishes which lived in the sandy pools by the shore. All 
through the day she cared for them, so that they grew to 
love her, too, better than all others except, of course, the 
Golden Sunfather who had put them there. 

The South Wind was her dearest friend, breathing her 
soft, warm breath about the little nymph, making her 
warm and happy, and together they frolicked with the 
flowers thru the day. The East and West Wind loved the 
maiden, too, and told her wonderful stories of their jour- 
neys far and wide. Sometimes the strong East Wind car- 
ried her far over the land to the Land of Dawn where the 
Sun father. Moon mother and their Star children dwelt. 

The North Wind was very different, however. He 

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(S^tie CoUege ^reetinssf 




was jealous of the friendship of his brother and sister winds 
and sought every chance to bring unhappiness to the little 
Fairy. He would send his icy winds upon her and breathe 
his angry tempests about her. All the Fairies feared him; 
the flowers drooped their heads and crouched low against 
the good Earth when he came near. 

The little Nymph maiden, however, did not mind him, 
for the kind Sea was very good to her and soothed her 
fears with tender caresses. At evening he would sing low, 
sweet songs to her, and when Night came, he would creep 
softly up to her cavern door to guard her slumbers. 

The North Wind knew that the Sea loved the maiden, 
and he grew to hate him, too. Many times he blew fierce- 
ly upon the Sea and lashed him with his storms of temper. 
Finally the anger grew so severe that for many days the 
maiden must stay within the cavern. The North Wind 
froze the pools of the Golden Fishes, with his icy breath, 
to anger the Nymph. He could not conquer the Sea, no 
matter how cold his winds and this was a great humiliation. 
The Nymph only loved the Sea more for his tender care 
and patience, and waited for Night to come when he would 
creep nearer. 

The Sea was very sad for he knew that the Nymph 
must always stay on the land and that he could never 
take her in his arms and tell her his love. Sometimes 
when the sadness grew unbearable and his heart was an- 
gry, he tossed his huge body about and flung his brave 
arms above him. The North Wind delighted in these 
outbursts and would rush out over the Sea with his wildest 
roar. Then the Sea would in shame become calm and 
would hide his feelings. 

The Sun father each day watched the contest of the 
rivals, and at night the Moon mother and Star children 
watched, too. Then, because the Sun father was kind 
and loved the Sea, he decided to help him. So, when the 
Nymph was one day feeding the Golden Fishes and the 
North Wind sent his piercing breath about her, the Sun 
father sent his warmest rays upon her and the North Wind 

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Ct)e College ^reetinsst 



withdrew in shame. The Nymph, in her gratitude, turned 
to thank the Sun father. Then he saw how very beau- 
tiful she was. 

"You are far too beautiful to be a nymph of the mead- 
ows and forest," he said. "You should be Queen of the 
Sea." 

So it happened that the Sun father told the Moon 
mother all about it, and that night when she and her Star 
children guarded the Earth, she called the nymph maiden 
from her cave home to the moon-lighted shore. Then, 
while the South Wind sang a tender little love song, the 
Moon mother stooped and kissed the beautiful maiden. 
Immediately she became a Sea Maiden. The Star children 
fastened glistening pearls in her hair as their gift, and 
clothed her in a gown of soft, green mist. 

The good Sea smiled in his happiness, and reaching 
upward drew his bride upon his breast. The Moon mother 
blessed them with her golden light, the Stars twinkled, 
and everybody was filled with wonderful happiness. 

The North Wind can not forget his anger, and when 
he sees the Sea and his Queen so happy, he again rushes 
out over the water with his chilling blasts. And Mortals 
call them Storms, for they know naught of the true story. 
Still the Sea, when the Moon mother smiles down upon 
the Earth, creeps close to the deserted cave home, lest 
some harm come to it. For it is here, when the warm 
days come again, and the North Wind retreats to his home, 
that the Sea Queen welcomes the South Wind and all her 
old friends. But we, who can not tell the real from the 
unreal, call it the Tide, the warm days, Summer, and the 
days when the North Wind spends his wrath, Winter, for 
we are only Mortals. — Feme Parrott, '18. 

EXHIBITION OF AMERICAN PAINTINGS. 

The Woman's College and Jacksonville is to have 
an unusual privilege from March 25th to April 10th, when 
there will be on exhibition in the Society Halls, over forty 

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^i)t CoUcge (greetings 




pictures by modern American painters. This exhibition 
comes as a number on the Artists' Course, and is assem- 
bled by the American Federation of Arts, Washington, 
D. C. 

A majority of the pictures were shown at the winter 
exhibition of the National Academy' of Design, New York, 
and others were specially invited from the artists to com- 
plete and round out the collection. The exhibition prom- 
ises to be a distinguished showing, and is varied and inter- 
esting in its selection, and the list of painters holds some 
names most distinguished in the story of present day Amer- 
ican painting. 

There will be several pictures from painters of the old- 
er school, representing the period standing between the 
"Hudson River School" of painters and the modern school 
of landscape painters. Of this older school, F. S. Church 
and Geo. H. Smillie will show pictures. 

Edward Redfield sends his picture, "The Red-Barn," 
which is a delightful plein air picture of much charm and 
atmosphere. He is one of that school of realists who has 
profited by the experiments of the impressionists or lumin- 
arists, but has not used their methods. Of this same school 
are Gardner Symons and William Wendt, who paints 
such wonderful pictures full of imaginative quality of Cal- 
ifornia landscape. 

E. Irving Couse will show one of his incomparable 
Indian pictures, filled with the very atmosphere and soul 
of the red-men he paints. 

Edward Potthast will have a picture of bathers on the 
beach, sparkling with sunlight and color, a work similar 
in spirit to the Spanish painter Sorolla. 

Leonard Ochtman, a painter of winter landscapes, be- 
longing to the school of plein air painters, will show a pic- 
ture of subtle intimate charm called "Winter." 

Rishard Miller, who has made such a distinguished 
record of recent years, both abroad and at home, will have 
a picture, and Rrederick Frieseke will show a fine example 
of his work called "In the Garden," Frieseke has a style 

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^fit CoQese Greetings; 



of sparkling radiance of color and light that strongly re- 
flects French influence of today. 

Others represented are Robert Spencer, who, though 
a young and almost unknown painter, has had the honor 
of a recent purchase of one of his works for the Metropol- 
itan Museum of Art; Jonas Lie, who made that wonderful 
showing of Panama Canal pictures in Chicago last sum- 
mer; Hobart Nichols, John Johanson, Charles Curran, 
Jane Peterson, and Charles Warren Eaton will have pic- 
tures; Mrs. Kenyon Cox, a portrait of Mrs. Homer St. 
Gaudens and son; Paul Cornoyer, who interprets the as- 
pect and life of our great modern cities, revealing their 
inherent beauty and charm, will have his delightful pic- 
ture, "Morning, Washington Square," and there will be 
some twenty or thirty other painters represented, in all a 
showing of over forty pictures. 

The exhibition promises much of real pleasure and 
delight and has in store an enrichment for every one, in a 
bigger meaning of the beauty of life and out-of-doors, and 
its expression through the medium of paint. 

N. A. K. 



EASTER DATES. 

Easter falls this year on April 4, which is about mid- 
way between the earliest and the latest possible dates. 
The earliest possible date is March 22, and the latest pos- 
sible date is April 25. The rule for Easter is that it is al- 
ways the first Sunday after the full moon, which happens 
on or after the 21sl of March. Consulting a table which 
gives the date of Easter from the year 1786 to the year 
2013, a period of 22 7 years, we find that in all that time 
Easter occurs on March 22 only once, which was in the 
year 1818. 

In 1916 Easter comes very late, not until April 23. 
This late date occurs in the 22 7 years only four times. In 
1848 Easter was on April 23; in 1905, in 1916, and again 
in the year 2000. It occurs as late as April 24 three times 

|>age Ten 



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tlTfjE CoUege Greetings 




in this period — in 1791, 1859, and again in 2011. It 
occurs on April 25, the latest date possible, only twice — 
in 1886 and again in 1943. 

THE AREA OF COLLEGE ATTENDANCE. 

President Marker has been making some interesting 
studies on the extent of territory from which colleges draw 
their students. He has the figures for 26 of the represen- 
tative colleges from all parts of the country. It is sur- 
prising how large a percentage of the students come from 
within 50 or 100 miles of the college. For instance: 

Harvard University secures 61 % of its regular college 
students from a radius of 100 miles. Marietta College, 
Ohio, S8%, only one-eighth of its students coming from 
outside this area. Beloit College, Wisconsin, 73% within 
100 miles; Grinnell College, Iowa, 65% ; Baker College, 
Baldwin, Kansas, 72% ; Colorado College, 62% ; Pomona 
College, Claremont, California, 86%; Swarthmore Col- 
lege, Penn., 79% ; and the University of Rochester, New 
York, 93%. 

A few colleges only cover a much wider area. Am- 
herst College, Mass., secures only 42% from within 100 
miles, nearly two-thirds of its students coming from the 
wider area. Williams College seems to hold the record 
in this respect, only 23% coming from within 100 miles 
and more than three-fourths of the students from the out- 
side. In Yale University the figures are nearly even, 47 % 
coming from the 100-mile area. 

The Vv^oman's Colleges cover a larger area. Smith 
College, Northampton, Mass., shows only 35% within 100 
miles. Vassar College, 42%. The Illinois Woman's Col- 
lege ranks with Vassar in this respect, 42% of its 145 
students in the four regular college classes coming from 
within 100 miles, and 58%, or nearly three-fifths, com- 
ing from the wider area. This wider area includes nearly 
all the states west of Illinois, and from Texas to Wyoming. 
The College draws largely from eastern and northern Ill- 
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^i)e CoUese ^tettitiQi 



inois and from Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, and Minnesota. 
In addition to a number of local students now enrolling 
for the second semester, there are new students from four 
states. 

S» 
TO 89. 

Our feeling- toward you can't be printed, 89; 

You're worse than none! 
You're on the heels of pride, unstinted — 

That shining A we haven't won! 
1" 

Come, make our record look much better; 

Change your standing — bad with us; 
Can't you have a special letter? 

Don't hide behind a vague B-plus! 

— The plea of the winner of four 89's. 








WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY PARTY. 

One of the most enjoyable events of the year was the 
Washington Birthday Party. At five-thirty, the gay party 
of George's and Martha's assembled in the front hall and 
marched to the dining room. In the front hall, George 
Washington, cleverly represented by George Metcalf, was 
in the act of chopping down the cherry tree. 

The dining room was prettily decorated by red candles 
and lights which made the costumes more attractive. Be- 
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^f)t Collese ^ttetinQSi 




fore dinner was served one verse of America was sung. 
After dinner everyone joined in the national song, then 
marched upstairs where a grand march took place in the 
front corridors. 

The entertainment for the evening was a presentation 
of "The First Lady of the Land" by the Dramatic Club. 
The play could not have been more suitable or enjoyable. 

DRAMATIC CLUB ORGANIZED. 

The Dramatic Club was temporarily organized on 
February 3, with about thirty-five members. Miss Audrey 
Berryman was elected chairman pro tem, and Miss Helen 
McGhee, secretary pro tem, until a constitution can be 
framed and the club formally organized. A committee is 
now working on the constitution. The girls in the club 
are very enthusiastic over the possibilities of what we may 
do. Various plans for the work of the club for the re- 
mainder of the year were discussed. The club accepted 
an invitation from the faculty to make the club's formal 
appearance on February 22nd, and presented Charles 
Nerdhnger's "The First Lady of the Land." The college 
guild and other friends were special guests of the faculty. 

"THE FIRST LADY OF THE LAND." 

The dramatic Club launched forth on its career in a 
blaze of glory and covered itself with honors at its initial 
appearance before a large and enthusiastic audience when 
it presented, on the evening of February 22nd, Nirdlinger's 
four-act play, "The First Lady of the Land." 

The cast was as follows: 

Sir Anthony Merry, British Minister Mary Harrison 

Jennings, a servant . Helen McGhee 

Rohlan Pinkney, President's Secretary .... Wilma Miller 
Sally McKean, afterwards Marchionees D'Yrugo. . . . 

Irene Crum 

Dolly Todd Corinne Hughes 

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Witt CoUese Greetings: 



Clothilda, a maid Katherine Long 

Sophia Sparkle, afterwards Madam Pichon 

Mildred Spencer 

Mrs. Sparkle, the gendarmine of the period 

Alice Tombaugh 

Aaron Burr Peril Hess 

James Madison Bertha Weber 

Ena Ferrar, Lady Merry's sister Ima Berryman 

Lady Mary, wife of British Minister Alma Harmel 

Hair Dresser Ethel Birkes 

Marquis D'Yrugo, Spanish Minister Alma Weber 

Louis Andre Pichon, Charge d'Affairs .... Esther Fowler 
DeVaux, Major Domo at White House . . Elaine Buhrman 
Mynherr VanBerkle, Minister from Netherlands .... 

Gertrude Wilson 

Vrow VanBerkle Phyllis Wilkinson 

Minister from Turkey Vivian Newman 

Minister from Russia Mary Louise Powell 

The Cook Marie Towle 

The action takes place during the administration of 
Jefferson and centers about the character of Aaron Burr. 
Peril Hess gave a subtle interpretation of this part and by 
her most unusual representation of the finished, brilliant, 
cynical Burr, created an atmosphere that compelled the 
unflagging interest of her audience. Corinne Hughes, 
truly the demure and winsome Quakeress, read her lines 
with a delicate charm and was captivating with her dainty 
coquetry. Bertha Weber as James Madison, carried most 
successfully a long and difficult part in a manner that was 
remarkable for an amateur. The parts of the British 
Minister and his domineering wife were played with a great 
deal of force by Mary Harrison and Alma Harmel. Helen 
McGhee and Katherine Long deserve special mention for 
making very attractive two relatively unimportant parts. 
The vivid and variegated costumes of the large assembly 
of ambassadors in the third act made this scene especially 
spectacular, and there were displayed here some clever 
bits of acting on the part of the minor characters. 

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Miss Gleckler is to be congratulated for her success in 
staging this difficult play and for bringing out of the mem- 
bers of the club such an admirable expression of their his- 
trionic ability. 

DAY OF PRAYER. 

We were fortunate in having Dr. Baker, pastor at 
Trinity M. E. church at Urbana, deliver the sermon on the 
Day of Prayer, and especially fortunate in having him 
with us for the three days preceding. In this way the girls 
had the opportunity to meet and know him personally. 
On these days Dr. Baker talked at both morning and eve- 
ning chapel, speaking in a most interesting and helpful 
way of the fundamentals of christian living. 

In connection with the work of the week there were 
several meetings conducted by the students. Every eve- 
ning the girls met for corridor prayer meetings. 

The annual services for the Day of Prayer for colleges 
were held in the college chapel, Thursday, February 4, at 
10:30. After a solo by Miss Miller, prayer was offered 
by Dr. Ruile of Minnesota. Dr. Marker chose as a scrip- 
ture reading Exodus 3, from which Dr. Baker chose his 
text. He spoke of the time when the angel of the Lord 
appeared in the burning bush, and Jehovah became to 
Moses a living personality. So with us, if our lives are to 
mean what they should to us, there comes a time when 
God becomes OUR God. When Moses felt the reality of 
God, he also felt the call to service. Today the call to 
help right the social order is heard. Dr. Baker spoke of 
men who had answered this call — as Livingston and Jacob 
Riis. He also emphasized the fact that the great things 
about these fighters for righteousness is their note of op- 
timism. His last thought was that through service God 
becomes to us a hving bright reality. 

The different classes held prayer meetings and in the 
afternoon a general meeting of the girls with Dr. Harker 
was held, an informal meeting of great help and inspira- 
tion to all. 

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Wl)t College ^xtttiriQi 




FEBRUARY THE EIGHTEENTH. 

On the night of February I8th, the I. W. C. dining 
room presented a gala appearance. Class banners on the 
walls, gay class colors flying from chandeliers, and tables 
lighted with candles and decorated with flowers, informed 
the uninitiated that "something was in the air," When the 
last dinner bell rang,' classes came in together, taking their 
places at the assigned tables. Last of all came the Fresh- 
men marching lockstep (or rather, trying to), led by Miss 
Hull, their class officer. With green colors flying from 
canes raised aloft, the long line of Freshmen made an ef- 
fective entrance. Soon after all were seated the Sopho- 
more song was started, and the Sophomores, rising, sang 
with their usual "pep" and vivacity. There shortly came 
the dear old college song — and, of course, the whole 
school rose for that. At intervals the various classes show- 
ed their class spirit by favoring us with their songs, and a 
few yells enlivened the atmosphere, too. The "First Year 
Preps" were about as enthusiastic a bunch as any in the 
room, and more so than some, considering difference in 
numbers. Loyal Illinoisans started the state song. This 
was an inspiration to the Indianians, although only a few 
ventured to join in on the chorus of "Back, Back, Back 
to Indiana." Wylma Cox showed her loyalty to Iowa by 
favoring us with the Iowa song. 

After dinner all adjourned to the college halls where 
a general college "sing" was enjoyed. 

All this was merely a preparation for the gala time 
around the big bonfire built in front of the power house. 
A fire alarm was rung at 10:15 and though no precise fire 
drill rules were followed as to the course of exit, the build- 
ing was emptied in a very few minutes. Indian war dances 
around the fire, yells, and much singing followed. 

Did you ask why all of this ? It was the first anniver- 
sary of the beginning of Student Government. 

SIGNS OF SPRING. 

Miss Mothershead asked for observations which had 

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been made as to signs of spring to be put on a paper on 

her bulletin board. These are the results: 

Feb. 14. A blue bird and a downy woodpecker. — A.M.M. 

Feb. 14. Boys flying kites. 

Feb. 16. Small boy roller-skating. — J. S. 

Feb. 16. Boys playing marbles. — M. C. H. 

Feb. 17. Violet leaf in my back yard. — H. D. 

Feb. 1 7. Clover leaves coming up on the campus. — 

M. L. G. 
Feb. 17. Saw and heard a scarlet tanager. Appearance 

of spring hats. — W. P. C. 
Feb. 1 7. Box-elder bugs again on the scene. — F. S. 
Feb. 17. Men without overcoats, — M. H. 
Feb. 1 7. Woodson washing windows. — D. A. S, 
Feb. 18. Saw dandelions. Girls have spring fever. — 

E. M. B. 
Feb. 18. Maple buds bursting. Spring bonfires. — E.L.G. 
Feb. 18. A mothmiller flew in through the window. — 

W. P. C. 
Feb. 19. SAW A ROBIN.— W. P. C. 
Feb. 19. Gypsy came to town. — M. C. H. 
Feb. 19. Lady up town with short sleeves and no gloves. 

— E. M. R. 
Feb. 19. Girls using the rope swing. — R. P. 

Seraphina asked for a tea strainer through which to 
pour the coffee at lunch recently. 

ANTIGONE. 

The Classical Club of Jacksonville is arranging for the 
production of its second annual Greek play. The play 
selected for this year is Sophocles' Antigone, with Men- 
delssohn's music. The chorus, composed of students of 
the Woman's College, is rehearsing under Mr. Steam's 
direction. 

COLLEGE CALENDAR. 

Feb. 1. Enrollment for new semester. Dr. Baker ar- 
rives. 

Page Seventeen 




wssasBsa 

^iit College (Greetings; 



Feb. 2-3. Dr. Baker talks at chapel. 

Feb. 4. Day of Prayer. 

Feb. 6. Dramatic Club meeting. 

Feb. 7. Miss Hull talks in Y. W. C. A. 

Feb. 8, Mrs. Hartman appears in voice recital. 

Feb. 9. Societies bid new members. 

Feb. 1 1 . Grades read in the office. 

Feb. 12. Lincoln's birthday observed in chapel. 
Arthur Shattuck's recital. 

Feb. 13. Society banquets, parties and initiations. 

Feb. 14. Miss Mothershead entertains Faculty with a# 
Valentine party. 

Feb. 18. Anniversary of inauguration of Student Gov- 
ernment. 

Feb. 20. Lamba Mu banquet. 

Feb. 22. George Washington party. The Dramatic 
Club makes it first formal appearance, 
presenting "The First Landy of the Land." 

Feb. 2 7. Theta Sigma banquet. 

Feb. 28. The last day of the shortest month of the year. 

FRESHMEN ORGANIZATION. 

February 18, 191 5, marked the day to which the 
Freshman class has long looked forward. On that eve- 
ning it met in the old chapel and elected its officers. The 
results of the meeting are as follows: 

President — Vivian Keplinger. 

Vice-President — Mabel Osborne. 

Secretary — Dorothy Westfall, 

Treasurer — Maude Strubinger, 

Yell Leader — ^Mildred Spencer. 

EXPRESSION NOTES. 

There has been quite a large increase in the enrollment 
of students in the expression department this semester. 

Miss Gleckler gave a most pleasing miscellaneous pro- 
Page Eighteen 




Wi}e CoUese ^reetingfii 



gTom on Monday afternoon, February 15, at the anniver- 
sary meeting of the College Hill Club. 

Miss Gleckler also read at the anniversary meeting of 
the Domestic Science Round Table on Tuesday, February 
16. 

Miss Shaw read Lindsey's "Abraham Lincoln" at the 
special chapel exercises February 12. 

Y. W. C. A. NOTES. 

The past month has been one of great interest and 
progress in Y. W. C. A, work. The series of services con- 
ducted by our faculty is splendid. Miss Hull opened our 
eyes to the broader understanding and outlook which 
science has given to christian thought. Miss Cowgill show- 
ed us how people, from the most primitive races up to our 
civilized peoples, have through the arts, and especially 
literature, given expression to their aspiration to know 
more of God. The eternal question in man's mind is, 
"What is God?" Tennyson has expressed this thought 
in his beautiful words: 

"Flower, in the crannied wall, 
I pluck you out of the crannies; 
I hold you here, root and all, in my hand. 
Little flower, but if I could understand 
What you are, root and all, and all in all, 
I should know what God and man is." 
On another Sunday, Miss Jennie Anderson talked to 
us about history and the development of the church in a 
most interesting manner. 

A new plan has been adopted by the National Board 
by which the students of different colleges may come into 
closer contact with one another and the National Board, 
The colleges have been formed into groups, according to 
geographical location. From such a group one member, 
known as the annual member, is sent to the conferences, 
the first this year to be the Geneva conference. It is her 
duty to represent the group of colleges, all of which share 
in her expenses. If carried out carefully, this plan will 

Page Nineteen 




tEiit College (Greetings; 



surely make our student movement more democratic and 
more effective. 

Miss Mabel Hess, from Illinois College, has been chos- 
en to represent the folliwing colleges this year: Millikin, 
Knox, Illinois, and Illinois Woman's College. 

THETA SIGMA. 

Several of our former members have written that they 
are coming back for the annual Theta Sigma banquet, 
which will be given Saturday, February twenty-seventh. 

Theta Sigma is very proud to claim as new members: 
Ila Allen, Ruth Pinkston, Ruth Mendenhall, Hazel Ingram, 
Zella Osburn, May Clarke, Zella Rishel, Ethel Clarke, Lu- 
cille Rexroat, Margaret Frye, Edith Sawyer and Winifred 
Sale. 

Saturday evening, February 13, the Theta Sigma so- 
ciety was entertained at a delightful Valentine party, by 
Irene Merrill, A hunt for hearts began the fun, and hearts 
there were, hundreds of them, behind every picture, in 
every corner. Games and ghost stories occupied the rest 
of the evening until the auction, when Anne Floreth, as 
auctioneer, sold off the new members, one by one, to the 
highest bidlers, for flunkeys. 

yf 
LAMBDA ALPHA MU. 

The society is happy to announce that on February 
sixteenth, the following girls were initiated as members of 
Lambda Alpha Mu: Miriam Anderson, Reba Gaskins, 
Dorothy Westphall, Maude Strubinger, Winifred Burk. 
Ethel Birkes, Ruth Young, Edith Brown, Celesta Mills and 
Elisabeth Witbeck. 

At 6:30 p. m., on February twentieth, the Lambda 
girls, new and old, met at Colonial Inn for their annual 
banquet. The menu was sumptuous, of course, as all such 
menus are, but above all we enjoyed the toasts of the eve- 
ning. We were glad to have with us Miss Mary Anderson, 
who presided most graciously as toastmistress and called 
for the following toasts: 

Page Twen^ 




Ci)e CoUege (§reettnss> 



"Gladly we rank ourselves with Thee." — Ethel Birkes. 

To Friendship — Helena Munson. 

"Here's to the friends we class as old, 
And here's to those who are new; 
May the new grow soon to us old 
And the old ne'er grow to us new." 

"Standing for scholarships and fun 
And true college spirit, all in one." 

— Mary Harrison. 
To Lambda Alpha Mu — Ruth Want. 

"To those who know thee not. 
No words can paint; 
And those who know thee. 
Know all words are faint." 
As the banquet celebrated the initiation of our new 
members, the topics of the toasts were especially appro- 
priate. Ethel Birkes, as a new girl, answered charmingly 
the quotation from our song, while Helena Munson's re- 
sponse "To Friendship" was full of tender reminiscence 
and real feeling for the richness of friendship which the 
society relationship brings to its members. We joined 
hands around the banquet table and sang the society song 
before going into the music room where Elisabeth Wit- 
beck and Edith Brown sang and May Shastid gave several 
instrumental numbers. Besides the present membership 
there were also present several former members and guests 
among whom were Dr. and Mrs. Harker and Miss Mothers- 
head from the college. 

On the day of the iniation, the old members were 
much sur^^rised, upon entering the hall, to find a large 
mission "Grandfather" clock looking very much at home 
in its place in the corner and bearing the card, "To Lamb- 
da Alpha Mu, from Her Pledges." The clock is a beauti- 
ful article in itself and adds very greatly to the appearance 
of the hall. 

We were very glad to have with us during examination 
week, Verna Pierce, one of our last year's members, who 
is teaching this year in the public schools of Dover, 111. 

Page Twenty-one 



§^ 



Cfje College (Greetings! 



The society is to study, this semester the Feminist 
Movement, as it is finding expression both through the 
women of our country and those of foreign lands. 

BELLES LETTRES. 

Belles Lettres is very glad to announce the following 
new wearers of the shield: Blanche Loveless, Gertrude 
Wilson, Margaret Slatten, Vivian Keplinger, Marie Toole, 
Beulah Smith, Andra Miller, Margaret Wilder, Leta 
Groves, Louise Savage, Mildred Spencer, Isabel Carriel, 
Bess Brewer, and Helen Mathis. 

An impressive initiation was held in the hall the night 
of February thirteenth. After the ceremonies every one 
had a delightful informal time at the Valentine party. 

At the meeting the following Tuesday, the new girls 
had an opportunity to display their literary and musical 
ability and we are certainly delighted to welcome them 
as members. 

PHI NU NOTES. 

Phi Nu was very glad to add to their numbers the fol- 
lowing new girls: Anna Moore, Marjorie Brown, Anna 
Margaret Gist, Gladys Holland, Grace Reavis, Katherine 
Glascock, Romaine Loar, Olive Scott, Grace Lees, Made- 
line Land, Louise Virgin, Marjorie Barr, and Margaret 
Goldsmith. 

Saturday evening, February 13, the old members gave 
a Valentine banquet for the new ones and the presence of 
two old Phi Nu's, Celia Cathcart and Freda Sidell, added 
to the pleasure of the evening. 

The following Tuesday the new girls were initiated and 
it was with joy and feeling that the old girls, with the sup- 
port of the new, sang again : 

Let us gather of the brightness 

While Morn shines on our way. 
That we may scatter sunshine 
Where darkness hides the day. 



Page Twenty-two 



Cfte CoUege ^reetingfli 



^^ 



Our band shall ne'er be broken, 
Tho' severed by land or sea, 

For a thread of blue will join us 
E'en to eternity. 



LOCALS. 

The chapel service on January 26 was made especially 
interesting by a short forceful talk given by Dr. A. E. 
Corey, secretary of the "Men and Millions Movement" 
of the Christian church. We see from the last Pegasus 
that Eureka College is to have a new gymnasium as a re- 
sult of the efforts of the movement. 

Mrs. Hartman entertained in her studio in honor of 
Mr. Shattuck after his recital. Mr. Shattuck's recital in 
piano was enthusiastically received and applauded. 

Mr. DeWitt visited with Helen one day this month. 

The sympathy of all went out to Louise Gilfilan when 
she was called home because of the death of her mother. 
We were glad she has been able to continue her year's 
work. 

Ola Lux, who was forced to drop her work at the end 
of the first semester last year, has returned to continue 
her course. 

A number of new students have entered our lists for 
the second semester. They are: Adelaide Ferris, Joy 
Webb, Mildred Stearns, Sydney Brown, Mary Fern Gillog- 
ly, Sina Read, Reba Ferguson. 

Harriett McManus was lately called home by the death 
of her aunt. Her return was welcomed. 

The Monday Conservation Club was entertained in 
the Society Halls by Miss Mary Anderson and Miss John- 
son on February 8. 

On February 8, Mrs. Hartman appeared in voice re- 
cital before a large, appreciative audience. After the re- 
cital, Miss Knopf, Mrs. Colean, Miss Miner, and Miss Miller 
entertained in honor of Mrs. Hartman, 

Page Twenty-three 




t!Di)e CoUes^ 4^reetingsi 



ALUMNAE NOTES. 

A son, Preston Aldace Ferris, was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Claire E. Ferris. Mrs. Ferris was Hazel Ash, who gradu- 
ated in the class of '10. Mr. Ferris is a druggist in the 
city of Santiago, Cal. 

Word has been received from Miss Postel of the St. 
Louis I. W. C. Alumnae society, that Susan Rebham is 
now president and Nelle Holmback secretary of the or- 
ganization. They are planning to hold a meeting at us- 
ual time, early in May. 

Word has been received announcing the birth of a 
daughter, Geneva, to Mr. and Mrs. William E. Fearson of 
Coalinga, Cal. Mrs. Fearon was formerly Miss Lulu Black- 
burn, a member of the class of '99 of I. W. C. 

The Illinois Woman's College Society of Decatur, Illi- 
nois, held their meeting February 19. A six o'clock dinner 
was served, after which a very interesting program was 
given and a business meeting held. 

Dr. and Mrs. Marker and Mrs. Lambert were present 
to represent I. W. C. of today. 

Miss Glayds Leavell, who received her A. B. in 19H, 
is teaching chemistry and mathematics in Lenox Hall, St. 
Louis, Mo., and studying at Washington University, 

Miss Mildred West, who graduated in the same class 
with Miss Leavell, is teaching German and history in Mar- 
ion Normal College, Marion, Ind., and studying at Marion 
Conservatory. 

A few weeks ago Dr. Harker asked all the girls who 
had had relatives in school at any time to hand in their 
names and the dates when they attended. There were 
thirty-two girls who handed in lists and the number of 
relatives that have attended the college totalled a hundred 
and nine between the years 1852 up to the present. 

Mae Blackburn holds the record of twenty-one rela- 
tives. Rose Ranson comes next with thirteen, and Lucile 
Rexroat has had nine. Helen McGhee and Lura Wiswell 
each have had six. Three girls had five relatives and as 
the number decreased the number of present girls in- 
creased until for those with one relative, there were eleven. 

Page Twenty-four 




Wift CoUcge (grectingiS 



EXCHANGES. 

A few extracts. Do you recognize any from your 
college paper? 

Class Room Etiquette. 

1. Come late, if possible, because then you will be 
seen to better advantage and aid the lecturer in his pause. 

2. Never bring a note-book. You can borrow paper 
from your friends and the noise created is but a slight dis- 
traction. 

3. If you haven't a fountain pen, someone will loan 
you a pencil, which you can sharpen during the lecture. 
This enables those near-by to laugh without being heard. 

4. Sleep, if possible, because the lecturer prefers an 
interested audience. 

5. If sleep is not agreeable, talk to the girl next you. 
Her giggles at your witticisms "enthuse" the lecturer. 

6. Throw ink on the floor, for the college has jani- 
tors for the express purpose of keeping them clean. 

7. Lastly, don't take notes, because if you follow 
these rules you can remember all that the lecturer has said. 

—Ex. 

"Bill, wot's the Infantry?" 

"Why, don't cher know 'arry? It's one of them there 
kindergartens. ' ' — Ex. 

Came to college, 
Joined the 'leven; 
Played one game. 
Went to heaven. — Ex. 

A professor in the University of Chicago declares that 
to be educated a man must be able to truthfully answer 
the following list of questions: 

Has education made you public-spirited? 

Has it made you a brother to the weak? 

Have you learned how to make friends and keep 
them? 

Do you know what it is to be a friend yourself? 

Page Twenty-five 



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i;fie CoIIese iBvutiriQi 



Can you look an honest man or a pure woman in the 
eye? 

Do you see anything" to love in a little child? 

Will a lonely dog follow you in the street? 

Can you be high-minded and happy in the meanest 
druggeries of life? 

Do you think washing dishes and plowing corn just 
as compatible with high thinking as piano playing and 
golf? 

Are you good for anything yourself? 

Can you be happy alone? 

Can you look out on the world and see anything but 
dollars and cents? 

Can you look into a mud puddle by the wayside and 
see a clear sky? 

Can you see anything in the puddle but mud ? 

Can you look into the sky at night and see beyond the 
stars ? 

The list will test the culture of the most refined. Try 
it on yourself and see whether or not you are "educated," 
forgetting for the time being that you may never have 
seen the inside of a college building. — Ex. 

Ruth rode in my new cycle car, 

In the seat in back of me. 

I took a bump at fifty-five 

And drove on Ruthlessly. — Ex. 

"Why did you flunk that exam? " 

"I can't think.— Ex. 

"Despot — A ruler that is feared." 

"Me teacher swatted me wid her despot." — Ex. 

"How did you manage to raise that gym contribu- 
tion?" 

"Used a jimmy." — Ex. 



Page Twenty-six 



juMniiimiiMiiiiinHnMiiiiiMiniininiHinniiniiiininiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiHiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiniiiMiiiiniiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiniiMiiiiiiiiMiiiiniiHiiiiH 

! GARMENTS FOR YOUNG WOMEN! 

I The newest and most poiDular fashions of the day | 

I reach our show room first — straight from the work- | 

I rooms of the New York workers. Attractive styles, | 

I for the young" women, especially, are shown here in I 

I profusion. | 



Coats 
Waists 



Suits 
Skirts 



Dresses 
Lingerie 



LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S FURNISHINGS. 




COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

Large assortment of footwear 
for every occasion. 

Dress, Street and Bed-room 
Footwear 

h: o IP :e^ E i^ s' 

We Repair Shoes 



J. A. OBERMEYER 



harry p. obermeyer 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

Pennants, Stationery, Tennis Goods, Drugs, School 

Supplies, Toilet Articles, Novelties, Memory 

Books and Photo Albums 

"PLEASED customers" — OUR MOTTO 

Goods Delivered 



I Phones: Illinois 572, Bell 457 Corner South Main St. and Square I 

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>MniiiiiiiiiiniiMiiiNiMiiniiiniNiiiiiiiinniinNiiniiiiiiiniiiHiiiimmiiiiiiniiiiilimiimiiiiiiinrMiiiiinMMiiiiiHiiNiiuiiMiiNiiiitiniinHiiiiiiiMiiniMnMiiHiiiiiitinMiiHi^^^ 

I 349 East State Street Studio: Southwest Corner Square 

I Otto Speith 

I photo portraiture 

I Official Catalogue I'lulKimi' 

I of Pictures Accepted ^^'^ oftet, we a. 

I '^ our tneniljership list 

I in the Exhibit of .^o"" '"^ ^-o^^-ession and tht 

= important that we have a i. 

i \~'^ /\ /^Cr /\ phers' Association of Ak 

I i / \ V^A / 3^ 9 needs is a large membership. 

i ,. ^ . „^., ^ , V. „ we can get anything we want 

= 327 Mary Carnell Philadelphia, Pa. . •,, ■ 

= ^ „ „ , ,„ ^ IS witlim reason. 

I 308—309 B. E. Doty Battle Creek, Mich. ARP YOTI mTTsIP TO 1 

I 315—318 H. S. Holland Charleston, S. C. VOT Tt/ P A RT ? 

I 51—52 The Daniel Studio Jackson, Miss. 

I 36—37 J. B. Schrlever Scranton, Pa. p. , -j, ■••••■. 

I 33 J. E. Van De Sande New Smyrna, Fla. 

I 28-29 Carl Schlotzhouer Lancaster, Pa. The Picture Exhibit at the Con- 

I 25 s. H. Wiiiard Corona, Cai. vention was a grand success both 

i 24 TheTomiinson Studio Trenton, N.J. i" the number of prints submitted 

I 19-20-21 The Brown's Studio.. New Bedford, Mass. and in the superiority of the work 

I 4_5_6 Fred H. Reed Wichita. Kan. displayed. There were 550 prints 

I 1-3 otto Spieth Jacksonville, III. submitted, out of which there were 

i 218-219 Louis Dworshak ^- ^9'' which rated high enough to be 

i -216 s. L. Fowler placed in the accepted class. 

I Clippings of the Ofl&cial Catalogue of our standing in Photographers 

I Association of America. 



I SEE 

I For Fancy Fruit and 

I Confectionery 

I 72 East Side Square 



WE SELL SERVICE! 

We do not ruu an ordinary type-setting 
plant — 

We leave that to the Other Fellow. 
When you have a job that requires 
quick action, send it to the only 
modern equipped shop in the city. 
Modern Machinery and the Ability to Use If 

The Roach Press 

308 East State Street 



Floreth Co. 

Leaders in Millinery, Coats, 

Suits and all your Dry 

Goods needs 

Always lowest possible prices 



Coover&Shreve 

Have a complete line of 

Drugs, Kodaks, Perfumes, 
Stationery and Holiday Gifts 

We do Developing & Printing 

East and West Side Square 



I DON T FORGBT US 

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Latest in JEWELRY, 
CUT GLASS and 

SILVERWARE 



AT 



I Russell & Lyon's 

I Oldest Established Jewelers 
I in Central Illinois 



Both Phones 96 



Mathis, Kamm & Shibe say | 

We can furnish your | 

Shoes and Party Slippers | 

in the popular styles, i 

leathers, and i 

fabrics I 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Member State and National Associations 



McCULLOUGH STUDIO 



EAST SIDE SQUARE 



A. G. — "The bricks used in building were sunburned." 
I. C. — 'The bricks were cooked in a kiln." 



Concern 



printers!, ^utilisifjerji, ^tationerg 

ENGRAVED CARDS 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAI. OCCASIONS 



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For those who discriminate 

We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to 
please the students who come to our city. We select only the 
best materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. 

Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 
Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 
College functions. 

Vickery Sc Merrigan 



CATERERS 



227 W. State St, 



iBoth Phones 309 

1 SAFEST PIvACE TO TRADE 

ILLERBY' 

i DRY GOODS STORE 

I West Side Square 



Brady Bros. 

Kverytliing' in Hardware, 
House-furnishings and Paints 

45-47 South. Side Square 



Established 1890 



C* V* Frankenberg 

Ladies^ and Gents^ Tailoring 

Cleaning, Altering, 

Repairing 

Improved Machinery, 

Best Work 
215 East State Street 



'^' * Jacks:snvsu;.e, ft..u 

Low Prices Square Dealing 
Keep us busy 

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Cloaks. Scj/ts. Fuf^s a'.'oMiluhsry^ 



: 



I iiMiMtiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiniiiiiiiiriiiiii iinii iiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuriiiiiiiiiiiitiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit: 

riDullenix & Ibamilton | 

Confectioners | 

CLBANUNKSS SERVICE QUALITY I 

Creams, Ices, Frappes, Sundaes, Sodas, Parfaits, I 

Mousses and all Hot Drinks | 

Home-made Candies and Salted Nuts I 

The Store of Merit | 

Phones 70 216 East State Street I 



Why pay more for no more? 

Let us sell you SHOES 

It means more spending money 
for you 

We cater to 3^our wants 

A. 5MITH 

The Popular Price East State Street 
Shoe Man 

WE REPAIR SHOES 



I. M. BUNCE & Co. I 



211 East Morgan Street 



Heard after a Dietetics exam: X — "I fed my five- 
months baby the two-months baby's allowance." 

Y — ."Well, I just guessed at those babies' diets. I 
didn't know them." 



IHARBY HOFFMAN FLORAL GO. 

I Desig-ns, Cut Flowers, 
I Plants 

I Southwest Corner Square 

I Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

I Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

I Greenhouses, Bell 775 

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McGinn IS' | 

The Young Ladies' Shoe Store i 

We carr}' a full line of Evening Slippers! 
in all colors. | 

If it's new, we have it | 

JAS. McGINNIS & CO.| 

East Side Square I 

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^ IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIII Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllll irilllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHH 



I 



Want 

Cut flowers 

FROM 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

Both Phones 




You will find a complete line of 

FANCY GROCERIES 

at 

Walker's Grocery 

Home Coofcingf a Specialty 

Both Phones 205 E. Morgan Stree 



Job Printing 

Of All Kinds 

John K* Long 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 



213 West Morgan Street 
Illinois Phone 400 



M. B. (in Histor}^ of Painting, speaking of Egyptian 
art) — "They made their figures longer to make them 
taller." 



I Dorwari Market. 

j ALIv KINDS OF 

IfRESH and SALT MEiATS 
I FISH, POULTRY, Etc. 

fBoth phones 196 230 W. State St. 

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KODAK FINISHING 

Vulcan Roll Films 

Cameras from $2.00 up 
E^verything strictly first class 

Vail & Vail 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 E. Side Sq. 
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immimiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiniiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiiimuiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiriiiiiimMiiiiiiiiiMnMiiiiiiiir ii iiiiiii<: 

c 
z 

3 

MoIIenbrock & McCuIIough | 



SUCCESSORS TO 



McDougall's Studio 



234i West State Street 



Illinois Phone 808 



"The Home of the Crispette" 

The Sanitary Pop-corn 
and Crispcttc Shop 

Pop-corn that melts in your mouth 
Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

East State Street 



One girl said tliat because of so much chanting in the 
service of the synagogue that it was a "very noisesome 
service." 



Gate Bat5 

Hub annex for XaMes 

221-223 East State Street 
Illinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 



H. J. & h. M. SMITH 

Art Needle Work 
and Millinery 

211 West state Street 



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i Phones 800 

I ROBERTS BROS. 

I DRUGS AND GROCERIES 

I We guarantee every purchase 
I and delivery or money 

I back 

I ROBERTS BROS. 

I 29 South Side Square Phones 800 



S. S. Kresge Co. 

5c & IOC Store 

A popular place for CoUeg-e 
Girls 



The Store tor 



iDRE)SS GOODS and SILKS 



^^f^?^ 



DRY GOODS STORE 



A. H. Atherton & Son 



Under Farrell's Bank 



We Develop and Print Promptly 



F. S. (in Geometry) — "Since the terms on both sides 
of my equations are all negative, 1 can make them affirm- 
ative." 



I E). A. schoe:dsack 

i Proprietor of 

[ City Steam Dye Works 

I Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

I Waists and Dresses 

I a Specialty 

I 330 East State St. Jacksonville, 111 

I Illinois Phone 388 

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Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



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Visit 
SCHRAM'S 

Jewelry Store 

We have good-looking and good-wearing goods I 

Will be pleased to show them I 



All the Faculty, Students and Friends 
of the College should have a Checking 
or Savings Account with 

F. G. PARRELL & CO. 

BANKERS 

F. E. Farrell, President 

E. E. Crabtree, Vice-President 

H. H. Potter, Cashier 

M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier 



T AYLOR'Sl 

Grocery 

A good place to trade I 
221 West State Street I 



R. S, — "The other nations were peacified." 
L. S. — "The Romans lived in a more luxuriant man- 
ner later." 

W. B. (looking up from a letter she was writing to a 
teacher's agency) — "Do you say 'Respectively' or 'Re- 
spectfully' at the end of a letter? " 



F<<WmH1HIIIHHmilllUIHIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIUIIIIIIimiinillllllllllllllMIIIIIIHIIIIUIIIHIIIHIIIMIHHIIIMmiHHNHIIIIIIIHIIIHIHIUHIHmUHUIUttNHIIINHimMIIH 



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The I^atest in 

College Jewelry, Society 

Stationery, Bracelet 

Watches, Silver and 

Cut Glass 



AT 



BASSETT'S 



21 South Side Square 



C. J. Deppe & Co 

Known for "Ready-TO- 

wear" and Popular 

Priced Dry Goods 



I Piepenbrings Variety Store 

I One block east of College 

j HERE TO PEEASE 

I Candies Cakes 

I Cookies Pies 

I Sandwiches Pop on Ice 

I Groceries California Fruits 

I School Suppiies 




Jacksonville's foremost Store for Me 
and Specialties for Women 

Mannish Sweaters 

Mackinaw Coats, KnittedToque 

Mannish Rain Coats and H a 

Trunks and Handbags 



Clippings From Examination Papers. 

"The Jordan river wriggled down the valley." 
"An isosceles angle is larger than a right angle." 
"In the ancient synagogue service the law was read 
and interrupted. This required considerable time." 



Ladies* Late Style Furs 



ARE SOLD BY 



Frank Byrns ^^* 



Store 



Cherry's Liver)/ 

Finest Light and Hea> 
Livery 
Lowest Rates 

*35"237i 302-304-306 North Main Stii 



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Confectionary 



CaterinsT 



Soda 



Candies 



Len G. Magill 


GAY'S 


1 


Printer 


RELIABLE 
HARDWARE 


1 


ast State street 111. Phone 418 




E 
E 



"The Jordan flowed into that terrible desolate expanse 
of salty liquid." 



SHEET MUSIC, MUSICAL MERCHANDISE | 

TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS 1 

AND SUrPLIES I 

19 SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE | 

III Ill iiiiiiiiiii mill iiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiii iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiMiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiii iimiiiiii ik 



EVERYTHING 
for the home 



ANDRE & ANDRE fJTZ 



STUDENTS 
Headquarters for Room Furnishings 

The Best Goods at the Price, no matter what the Price 

ANDRE & ANDRE 



THE GIFT 
STORE 



THE GIFT 
STORE 



|Dr. Albyn LincoIvN Adams 

I OCCULIST AND AURIST 

I to the State School for the Blind 
I 323 West State Street 

I Practice limited to diseases of the 
I Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

i Both Telephones 



DR. ALPHA B. APPLEBEE 
Dentist 

326 West State St. 



I We will pipe your house for 

I GAS 

1 or wire it for 

I ELECTRICITY 

i at cost 

I Jacksonville Railway & 

I Light Company 

i Two years to pay 224 S. Main St. 



''<MniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiMiiiiiMiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiMiNiiiinMiiininiiiiiMiininiiiiiiHiiiiiiMiiiHiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiMniiMUiiiMiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



DR. A. J. KINGSLE"" 

DENTIST 

409 Ayers National Bank Bldg. 

Both Phones 760 



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COLLEGE GIRLS: | 

See our Motor Coats, Mackinaws and Sweaters i 

Also Ladies' Holeproof Hosiery | 

LUKEMAN BROTHERS I 



Girls; Patronize Our Advertisers 



Founded J 852 



Capital 
^200,000 

Surplus 
^^0,000 

Deposits 
^2,000,000 




United States 
Depository 

Postal Savings 
Depository 

Member of 

Federal 

Reserve Bank 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
Special Window for Ladies 
Ladies' Waiting Room 
We make a feature of Ladies' Accounts, and have 
provided facilities for their exclusive use 



OFFICERS 
M. F. Dunlap, President 
Andrew Russel, Vice President 
R. M. Hockenhull. Vice President 
Chas. B. Graff, Vice President 
H. J. Rodgers, Vice President 



O. F. Buffe, Cashier 
R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 
H. C, Clement, Asst Cashier 
W. G. Goebel, Asst. Cashier 
H. K. Chenoweth, Asst. Cashier 



Owen P. Thompson 
Kdward F. Goltra 
John W. I^each 



Arthur Vannier, Assistant Cashier 
DIRECTORS 

George Deitrick Harry M. Capps 

R. M. Hockenhull O. F. Buffe 

M. F. Dunlap Andrew Russel 



niiiiiiiiiniiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi mmiii iiiiiiiiii miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirm iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii; 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



ILLI 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 

Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



IS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 



College of LiberalArts 
College ot Music 
School of Fine Arts 
School of Expression 
School of Home Economics 

A Standard College — 
Regular college and academy courses 
leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 
inently a Christian college with every 
facility for thorough work. Located 
in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 
dignified, old college town, noted for 
its literary and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends 
who are looking for a good college. 

Call or address. Registrar 

Illinois Woman's College, 

Jacksonville, 111. 






^ii^: 



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i;f)e College (^reetingg 

•II The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 

•jl Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the fifteenth of each month. 

<|| Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
€j| Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as isecond class matter. 

Contents 

The Art Exhibit 3 

The Irish Potato 6 

Endowment Fund 8 

Editorial 9 

Athletic Association 11 

Freshmen Noies 13 

Nursery Rhymes 13 

College Specials 14 

College of Music . . , 14 

Social Functions 

St. Patrick's Dinner Party 15 

Senior-Junior Reception 15 

Freshmen Junior Reception 16 

Locals 17 

Y. W. C. A. Notes 18 

Clubs 

Egyptian Club 18 

Indiana Club 18 

Jokes 19 

Society Notes 

Belles I^ettres 22 

Theta Sigma 22 

Alumnae Notes 23 

Exchanges 25 

Thk 
Graphic Arts 

COirCERM 



■^— — «— -nil ■ ■ un m na im^^ni 




ij»u«i^»i lu nu im— — un^^im iiii im ii u h« um-^— ii n n » 




'4* '^ 



Work! 

Thank God for the might of it, 

The ardor, the urge, the delight of it — 

Work that springs from the heart's desire. 

Setting the brain and soul on fire— ^ 

Oh, what is so good as the heat of it, 

And what is so glad as the beat of it, 

And what is so kind as the stern command, 

Challenging brain and heart and hand? 

Work! 

Thank God for the pride of it. 

For the beautiful, conquering tide of it. 

Sweeping the life in its furious ftood. 

Thrilling the arteries, cleansing the blood, 

Mastering stupor and dull despair, 

Moving the dreamer to do and dare. 

Oh, what is so good as the urge of it. 

And what is so glad as the surge of it. 

And what is so strong as the summons deep, 

Rousing the torpid soul from sleep? 

— Angela Morgan. 




u— ^uii— un— i^au^^ui|i 



XLbcCoiicQC(3vcctinQ^ 



Vol. XVIII Jacksonville, 111., April, 1915 No 7 



THE ART EXHIBIT. 

Anyone going into the Society halls during the fort- 
night from March 2 7th to April 10th will find much de- 
light and pleasure in theforty-four pictures, by contem- 
porary American painters, which are there on exhibition. 
The exhibition is a distinguished showing of pictures with 
very distinctive qualities of charm and wonder, and it 
gives us an unusual opportunity to study the trend of 
painting in America today; and after study one is distinctly 
conscious of a moving spirit in American painting that is 
evolving a style peculiarly and eminently our own, a style 
no longer strongly imitative of the art from abroad but a 
fresh, spontaneous, vigorous point of view, poetic and 
imaginative in quality, and with the frankness of our open 
vision. To have these pictures for study and enjoyment 
for several weeks is to have an asset of a decidedly in- 
spirational nature, and the collection is so varied in inter- 
est and selection that everyone will find something pecu- 
liarly appealing to himself. 

A picture that must attract universal attention is "The 
Hill Country" by Gardner Symons, one of our most dis- 
tinguished landscape painters; a lovely stretch of snow- 
covered country and distant tree-covered purpling hills, 
a group of bare tree trunks with warm color against the 
winter sky, and in the foreground three cattle drinking at 
a well, over all the charm of an atmosphere so sympa- 
thetically painted, so humanly intelligible, that one is car- 
ried away to like scenes and places. 

Hobart Nichols, a young painter coming into con- 
spicuous prominence, contributes one of the most charm- 
ing pictures in the collection in his "Falling Waters." A 

Page Thre« 



^ije CoQege (Greetings; 



picture full of poetic vision, with the sparkling radiance 
of summer, of rainbow mist, of falling stream and color 
blended exquisitely into a sensation of dream suggestive- 
ness that renews its charm with each new viewing. 
"Summer" by Gustave Cimiotti is a very decorative 
arrangement, tall trees in a flower-strewn meadow that 
leads one back and way beyond where dreaming hills 
and purpling mountains reach the summer sky. All the 
peace and repose and quiet joy of a perfect summer day 
enticing one are broadly painted and yet the work has an 
exquisite finish that gives a deep sense of delight and sat- 
isfaction. 

An unusual and striking composition is that of Her- 
bert Dunton, "The Navaho Country." A vast sweep of 
sky with great clouds floating in the blue, a stretch of 
sage brush mesa, and aginst the purple of a far distant 
mountain three lonely Indian riders sweep the horizon 
line. The picture conveys all the solitariness of that 
desert country and the mystery of its red men. In 
"Winter" Leonard Ochtman gives us a beautiful 
and most satisfying rendering of a winter's day, full of the 
suggestiveness of lovely winter things and stillness. It 
is painted with very subtle charm that draws one back to 
view it many times. 

Edward Redfield, in his picture "The Old Barn," has 
interpreted for us winter country such as has been the 
experience of so many of us, and it is an intimate ren- 
dering that has great appeal. 

"The Valley" by William Wendt, one of the most 
prominent painters of California landscape, is a lovely 
California of wonderfully modelled hills and beautiful 
mountain tops of rare coloring. 

"Washington Square" by Paul Conoyer is a morning 
view of that old square in New York loved of artists. It 
is a picture full of the atmosphere and charm of time and 
place. 

"Sad Evening" by Ernest Lawson is a very interesting 



Page Foi}r 




tE^t College Greetings; 




subject of much imaginative quality and of great techni- 
cal interest. 

in the picture of Frederick Frieseke, "In the Garden," 
we have a most charming expression of a work very sug- 
gestive in style of the trend among modern French plein 
air painters. 

There are so many pictures we would wish to call 
attention to, for there is distinctive charm in all of them. 
Some are interesting because of subject, or perhaps be- 
cause of individual technique, and many just by reason 
of poetic interpretation of some of nature's moods. 

"The Spotted Curtain by Neilson is an extremely in- 
teresting- achievement technically and a picture of unus- 
ual charm of color arrangement and setting, being dis- 
tinctly modern in style. "Fore Street, St. Ives" by Dixie 
Selden is a street down which one could walk with pleas- 
ure, finding quaint shops and interesting folks to talk 
with. Jonas Lie with his broadly painted "Children 
Bathing" gives us a happy conception of nature. The 
picture is filled with the spirit of the moment and in style 
it is very expressive of the direction of present day Ameri- 
can painting. "Spring" by Robert Spencer, a young 
and most promising painter, is a springtime filled with 
the promise of moist earth, budding yellowing trees, ten- 
der sky and gentle atmosphere that makes one feel the 
tender touch of the new things of earth and spirit. There 
is nothing lovlier in the exhibition than John Johanson's 
"Woodland Pool," two lovely youthful figures in the 
shadowed depths of a deep, far-reaching forest. There 
is a mysterious pool of water in the foreground toward 
which one lovely form reaches with outstretched hand 
and through the deep greens of the dark vague forest a 
ray of sunshine falls on leaves and flecks a shoulder into 
brilHant light, an arm into sunshine. Painted very 
broadly, it yet has a most subtle charm of form and color 
that is elusive and enticing. The portrait of Mrs. St. 
Gaudens and son by Louise Cox is a very delightful pic- 
ture of a charming woman and a most alluring child and 

Page FiT« 



I 




Wi^t College ^ttttixiQi 




gives one a very pleasing sense of pleasure and interest. 
With a desire to make the exhibition mean much to 
the public as well as to the College, Dr. Marker shows a 
very broad public spirit in inviting the children of the pub- 
lic schools to come without admission fee and of placing 
the exhibition rooms at the disposal of various clubs for 
evening sessions. The exhibition should mean much in 
reawakening that art interest that is becoming so deep a 
thing in many of our smaller cities and towns, and it is 
a rare and unusual opportunity for enrichment to each 
and every one of us. N. A. K, 

THE IRISH POTATO. 

In Mrs. Murphy's garden there was contention and 
strife, hard feeling and bitter enmity. Not an onion was 
on speaking terms with a beet; strong was the rivalry in 
their corner of the garden. Nor did the cauliflower con- 
descend to recognize the presence of the cabbage, the 
radishes wilted the lettuce with their fiery glances, the 
beans from the top of their tent poles flirted with the peas 
climbing on the fence beside them but were completely 
ignored. 

It was a sad state of affairs indeed and grieved Denny 
Murphy sorely. He said he knew just how they felt by 
the way they turned up their leaves and paid no attention 
to each other. Denny's garden had been the pride of his 
heart the year before and peace and plenty had reigned 
from the bean poles to the parsley bed. But this year 
things were different. Denny had planted three rows of 
a choice variety of Irish potato right through the middle 
of the garden and they had thrived and sent out heavy 
vines blossoming with many little yellow-star flowers. 

The potato had made trouble from the start. The 
other vegetables had all agreed at first that it was an insult 
to have "that Irish upstart" there; quarrels had followed 
until none of the neighbors were on speaking terms. 
Denny was hurt by it all and tried his best to make peace 

Page Six 




tZTfje College (^vtttinqsi 




but to no avail. So he bided his time until the big-hearted 
Irish potato should mature and be lifted from the ground 
to the sunlight, for he knew that the potato was a true 
Irish gentleman and would settle this silly quarrel. 

Finally the day came when Denny knew it was time 
for the potato to open his eyes and see his neighbor. 

"The top o' the mornin' to you," he cried breezily 
as he looked around, "and how do you find yourselves 
this bright mornin? 'Tis well you're looking. Miss 
Cauliflower, and here are my old friends, Mr. Corn and 
Beans — well, well, how glad I am to see you! Perhaps 
we'll meet again — when I am mashed and you are suc- 
cotash on Mrs. Murphy's table — 'tis not an unhappy pros- 
pect, is it, when we think how it will make the little Mur- 
phy's round and rosy? I am glad you agree with me, 
Miss Cabbage, I knew you had a splendid head on you. 
And here's my old pal, Mr. Onion — a fine, strong char- 
acter, standing for the right thing. It brings tears to my 
eyes to think on his faithfulness in the past. It beats me 
— well, on my soul, here are the Beets, blushing as usual. 
It is because they live next door to you, Miss Radish. And 
the Lettuce sisters, how do you find yourselves? But 
you are always crisp and fresh as a spring morning — like 
Miss Parsley over there — did you have a hard winter?" 

And so he chatted on, and with the magic of his blar- 
ney dispelled all the gloom from the garden. In spite of 
themselves, the other vegetables were cheered and forgot 
their quarrels. The corn pricked up his ears, the cabbage 
lifted her head, and the whole garden was restored to 
good humor and peace and they joined the potato with 
right good will as he sang — 

"Oh, my father and mother were Irish — 
And I am Irish, too!" 

Winifred Robison, M7. 



Page Seven 




tE^tie CoHege ^reettns^ 



SPECIAL NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS ENDOWMENT 
FUND OF 1913. 

The total amount pledged to endowment by June, 
1913, was $182,242.56. Of this amount $137,839.67 
has now been paid. There remains unpaid $44,403.28, 
which will be due by June 4 of this year. It is earnestly 
hoped that this balance will be paid soon. 

Will every friend who sees this notice make an effort 
to send in the unpaid balance as soon as possible? It 
will be a great advantage to the College if all these ac- 
counts are paid by Commencement, June 1. 

If it is impossible in any case to make the payments 
by the final date, as promised in the subscription, the 
trustees will request that the subscription be put into the 
form of a note, with five per cent, interest from June 4, 
191 5, so as to make the total amount available as pro- 
ductive endowment. But they will greatly prefer that 
the pledges be paid rather than that notes be made. 

All remittances should be made payable to the Illi- 
nois Woman's College. 



Page Eight 




^i)e CoUese Greetings; 



Faculty Advisor — Miss Mary Anderson. 

Editor-in-Chief — Helena Munson. 

Associate and Alumnae Editor — Winifred Burmeister, 

Assistant Editors — Helen McGhee, Elaine Buhrman. 

Art Editor — Dorothy Stevens. 

Business Manager — Audrey Berryman. 

Assistant Business Managers — Alma Harmel, Mary Harrison. 



EDITORIAL. 

There is not one of us who does not have a deep long- 
ing to make good and measure up to the expectations of 
our parents and of our own ideals. It is no easy thing 
to do. Drifting, or doing the easiest thing that comes 
along, will not bring us anywhere. We must strike out 
on our own path to make progress. What is more, if 
we make good we must be more than just g6od. For 
some it is a comparatively easy thing to be good; they 
never seem to get in the way of trouble, but any one who 
is passively good is colorless. What counts is the posi- 
tive assertion of one's better self. One who actively 
does something for some one for the sake of the doing 
is the person who stands out as one of strength. Such are 
the people who count in the world. 

Just as the world needs positive characters, so our 
college needs positive students. If every girl who enters 
the walls of old 1. W. C. would so school herself, we might 
be certain of a student body which would move things. 
In our striving for our Alma Mater, let us make it our aim 
to be all-around girls who measure up and stand definitely 
for a cause. 

A short time ago Dr. Marker read to us extracts from 
a few of the numerous letters he had received from the 
leading universities in the country. They all gave the 
same verdict, with one exception, which was to the effect 
that any student who has received a degree from the Illi- 

Page Nine 




^tt College ^Ireetings: 




nois Woman's College is elligible to enter these univer- 
sities to pursue work which will entitle her to a master's 
degree at the end of one year. A few of the universities 
were: Johns Hopkins, Minnesota, California, Leland 
Standford, Wisconsin and Illinois. The one exception 
was the University of Michigan. This school had under- 
stood that the University of Illinois did not accept stu- 
dents from I. W. C, for this work. We are proud to say 
that the University of Illinois has accepted our graduates 
for graduate work and that the only two who have under- 
taken the work have brought honor to the school. The 
University of Michigan has been enlightened since. 

Many are the business envelopes which find their way 
to the Greetings office. Speeches of senators, bills intro- 
duced, and pamphlets of investigating committees are 
generally of interest and are often kept for future refer- 
ence. Other brilliantly colored advertisements of en- 
gravers travel by rapid transit to the waste paper basket. 
The contents of many an envelope after a hurried glance 
brings a smile to the reader's face who makes a mental 
note or possibly passes the fun along by showing it to a 
neighbor before dooming it to the same fate. Early in 
the year a fire arms company offered to supply us with 
fire arms in exchange for advertising. A short time ago 
we received notice of an essay contest which we were 
asked to announce. The essays were to be written on 
"The Esthetical Value of Cremation," The latest offer 
which we have received is a proposition by which we are 
to receive Polo Club cigarettes at the retail price of 25c 
per box to the extent of $10.00 if we will introduce them 
into the college by advertising. I wonder if the company 
wouldn't regret the waste of a postage stamp if they 
knew that their efforts only contributed to keep Tom 
busy emptying the waste basket. 

|*age Ten 




Clje CoUfse greetings; 




One hundred Freshmen next year! That is what 
every loyal daughter of I. W. C. would like to see. Write 
to every one you know who is going away to school next 
year and tell them just what kind of a college this is, just 
what we stand for, just what our aim is. Let them see 
that you like it and that will have far more effect than all 
the catalogues the office could send. Help swell the 
ranks of our college. Be a booster! Let every one see 
that you have college spirit, and the right kind. A Fresh- 
man class of one hundred! Yes, that is what we want, 
but is that all? No. We ought to have a Senior class 
of twenty-five, a Junior class of forty, and a Sophomore 
class of sixty next year. Begin to talk to your neighbor. 
Let her know you intend to come back. Use your influ- 
ence among the girls already here as well as among new 
girls. Here and now is the time to show your loyalty. 

A Sophomore. 

Who are, who are, who are we? 
We are the girls of L W. C. 
A pocket full of rocks, a head full of knowledge, 
I'd rather go to ours than any other college. 
This is the College yell which it seems is very old yet 
which none of us seem to know. Track Day is coming 
when we'll badly need some good college yells. Learn 
this one so that we can give it on the bleachers in rousing 
tones. We should have a long list of yells which belong 
to I. W. C. alone. If our clever rhymsters would put 
their heads together there is no reason why we shouldn't 
have what we need. The Greetings will be glad to print 
such yells in the May issue so that the girls will have a 
chance to learn them more readily and before the Big Day. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

Spring is really here. For proof of it just observe the 
redoubled activities in all lines of athletics. The tennis 



Page Eleven 



l^ije College Greetings; 




courts are being used, basketball girls are practicing daily, 
members of hike clubs are hiking, and some of the more 
ambitious have already begun to practice for track. 

Our new tennis court is a realization of a long talked 
of dream. The only drawback to it is that there is only 
one. We must plan and work for more hard courts now 
that we realize the good qualities of this one. 

Much interest and enthusiasm is being shown in the 
basketball tournament. There are four teams entering: 
the Academy, College Special, Freshmen, and Sophomore 
teams. There have been several exciting preliminary 
games in which the rooters as well as the players have 
gained some practice. The first of these games was that 
between the Faculty and Academy and the score was a 
victory for the Faculty in a very close and exciting game. 

The College Specials waged a rousing game with the 
Academy February 2 7. Lots of pep was in evidence on 
both sides, but the luck swung to the Specials, leaving the 
score 13-5. However, much credit is due to the "preps" 
for they played an exceedingly good game. 

March 6 the Freshmen played Sophomores a mighty 
good game of basketball. At the close of the first half 
the score stood 6-6. However, at the close of the second 
half the score stood 12-8 in favor of the Sophomores. 
Both classes gave their heary support to their teams. 

The first game of the series, between the College 
Specials and Sophomores, was scheduled for Thursday, 
March 18th. A close game in favor of the Specials, 
17-16, was played. 

The hike clubs have been reorganized with Vivian 
Newman, Katherine Glascock, Mildred Spencer and Edna 
Robb as leaders. We are expecting even more points 
this time than in the first term. 

Along with our many other activities we must keep in 
mind the fact that it will soon be time for our track meet. 
Those who were in the meet last year went in mostly for 
the fun of it, but this year we want to break some records. 
We have the material, and so — why not? 

Pa^e Twelve 



I 




turtle CoQege Greetings; 




FRESHMAN NOTES. 

The heart of every Freshman has been made glad over 
the fact that the class is finally organized. The first thing 
the Freshmen did was to entertain the Juniors. 

What could be more appropriate than for the Fresh- 
men to make their formal appearance in chapel on St. 
Patrick's Day! As the large green and white banner was 
unfurled the Freshmen marched to the front of the chapel 
singing "The VVearin' of the Green." Then they sang 
the class song — 

Honor and love to the college dear, 

Come now, her glorious praises hear. 

Her motto, ever we'll love, adore, 

In anthems of praise 

Our voices we'll raise 

For evermore. 

Knowledge, thy praise we sing. 

Faith, to thee we cling. 

Service freely we bring 

In all things we do. 

To our motto we're true, 

The yellow and blue. 
After the singing of the class hymn, "Oh Jesus 1 Have 
Promised," Dr. Harker gave a short talk. It was a very 
happy time for the Freshmen except for the fact that the 
class officer. Miss Hull, could not be present on account 
of her mother's illness. 

NURSERY RHYMES. 

For rhymes the editor has asked 

About things that are sure to last. 

There's nothing yet that one could name 

So glorious as Freshmen fame. 

We have a famous president. 

This fact is very prevalent. 

You'll find us here with all our "pep" 

Page Thirteen 




Ctie CoUese ^vtttinqi 




Ready to fight to save our "rep." 
We'll cheer our team with all our might 
Tho prospects be as black as night. 
We will admit we're mostly green, 
For to the white and green we're keen. 
Tho with the Sophs we're each a friend, 
Our sympathy we soon will lend. 
With mighty Juniors at our side, 
Victoriously to base we'll slide. 
And true is every Freshman girl, 
And we can set things in a whirl. 
I'm sure you know, both one and all. 
That Freshmen can play basketball. 
By those firm laws which we're allied 
With hearty zeal we each abide. 
Tho some may scorn these lines to read. 
They soon must Freshman victory heed. 

A Freshman. 

COLLEGE SPECIAL NOTES. 

The Recognition Service in honor of the Seniors of 
the College Special class was held March 13 at chapel 
time. The regular chapel exercises were varied by a well 
rendered violin solo by Mrs. Day and remarks by Dr. 
Marker, in which he traced the rise and development of 
the special vocations, such as music and art, showing the 
significance that is now attached to them. The Seniors 
were: Ima Berryman, who graduates in music, and Dor- 
othy Stevens, a graduate of the Art Department. 

COLLEGE OF MUSIC. 

A very interesting recital by the advanced students in 
the College of Music was presented Thursday evening, 
February 25. 

Miss Louise Miller of the Faculty won first in the Illi- 
nois State Contest at Peoria given by the National Federa- 

Page Fourteen 




t!Df)( College ^reettnssf 




tion of Music Clubs. She will enter the District Contest 
to be held in Chicago April 20, and if successful there will 
have the opportunity of appearing in concert before the 
delegates at the convention of the National Federation in 
Los Angeles in June. 

Mrs. Hartmann, Ima Berryman, and the Madrigal 
Club have assisted in the musical programs at Grace 
Church during the revival services held there the past 
month. 

Mrs. Day played a beautiful violin solo at the Recog- 
nition Service of the College Specials Friday, March 13. 

A ST. PATRICK'S DINNER PARTY. 

On Wednesday evening, March 17, Dr. and Mrs. 
Marker entertained the Seniors. A lovely five course 
dinner was served in their parlors. The color scheme 
was green as was appropriate to the day. A bowl of 
shamrocks in the center of each table made the guests 
feel that a bit of Old Erin had really found its way to 
America. After the dinner an Irish program was carried 
out. Miss Gleckler read several Irish poems, a guessing 
contest of Irish melodies with a Tipperary pup and Irish 
potato as prizes was open to the Seniors. Mrs. Hart- 
mann sang several of the sweet old Irish melodies, and 
other Irish selections were played on the victrola. As 
the Seniors said good night they felt that another happy 
milestone, and which lies close to the last of the race, had 
passed for them. 

THE SENIOR-JUNIOR RECEPTION. 

March thirteenth was one of the red letter days in the 
calendar of events at the Woman's College. Saturday 
evening the Senior class entertained the Juniors and about 
thirty other friends in the Society halls. 

Out of town guests were: Mr. Reno, Mr. Stuart, Mr. 
Husted, and Mr. Garber, from the University of Illinois; 

Page Fifteen 




^ije CoUege ^xtttinqs 




Dr. Munson of Rushville, Mr. Patton from Wheaton, Mr. 
Barton of Columbus, Mo., Mr. Spruitt, Mr. Lukeman and 
Mr. Theobald from Illinois Wesleyan University. 

The Society halls and the corridors approaching them 
were beautifully decorated with southern smilax and ferns. 
Green candles among the decorations and the green rib- 
bons of the Sophomore waitresses heightened the color 
scheme in honor of St. Patrick. The Seniors in their 
lovely trailing gowns gave the finishing touch to the dig- 
nity and beauty of the rooms. 

Stunts by groups of six, in which the patron saint of 
the Emerald Isle was again honored, furnished amuse- 
ment for some time. During the evening a delightful two 
course supper was served. After a number of songs by 
Miss Ima Berryman, which were immensely enjoyed, the 
whole company entered into singing various college songs 
before taking its leave. We feel sure that the good St. 
Patrick never rested as happily or contentedly in his grave 
as he has since the night of the thirteenth. 

JUNIOR-FRESHMAN PARTY. 

If ever Juniors were delightfully entertained, it was 
at the Junior-Freshman party which was given in the 
Society halls on Monday, March the eighth. 

Even as we went down the receiving line the success 
of the party was assured, for the hostesses were charming 
in their hospitality. The halls never looked lovlier than 
in the soft glow of candles placed artistically in every 
nook and corner. The Freshman colors, green and 
white, were predominant in the refreshments and in the 
decorative scheme of palms, ferns and cut flowers. 

Louise Savage, Olive Scott, Gladys Holland, Elisa- 
beth Witbeck, Madeline Land and Mildred Spenser added 
to the pleasure of the evening by their musical numbers, 
which were much appreciated by the Juniors, who felt 
proud of the talent and charm of their sister class. 



Page Sixteen 



(S^tje ColUs^ ^xtttin^i 




LOCALS. 

Many girls have been made happy this month by 
visits from fathers, mothers, sisters, brothers or — friends. 

A number of old girls have been back for short visits: 
Mabel Larson, Hazel Hamilton, Pauline Jones, Ruth 
Clements, Mary Moss, Mary Violet, Mildred Seaman, 
Bonnie Derry, and Louise Gates. 

The Senior-Junior reception brought a large number 
of out-of-town guests. 

Ankle-spraining has been quite popular lately. Even 
elevatorites are polite to the "crips" because crutches 
easily become dangerous weapons, no doubt. Fourth 
floor Harker is famed far and wide as the home of these 
slow moving celebrities. 

Are your neighbors troublesome? Then just sug- 
gest to them that they acquire the popular fad of small 
rugs, and away they will move, for a week at least. Pos- 
sibly people may think that there is to be a rummage sale 
on your corridor on account of the quantity of furni- 
ture strewn around, but no noise next door for a whole 
week and mirrors lining the hall are well worth such in- 
sinuations and even stubbed toes. 

On March first the German Club gave a Freitschke 
program. 

March eighth Bishop MacDowell gave a short but 
forceful talk in the chapel. Many were the regrets that 
it could not have been just a little longer. 

This year the nominations for May queen were con- 
ducted in a novel manner. From eighteen nominations 
made from the floor, twelve girls were selected by ballot. 
Of the twelve, one is to be chosen by lot as queen of the 
May, only a few minutes before the crowning is to take 
place. 

The whole school was made sad by the news of the 
death of Miss Hull's mother. Words have little value to 
express our sympathy for Miss Hull's sorrow. 



Page Seventeen 



HSBBWgJa ' a gt WUia B gflM H 



Wi}e College #reettngsi 



Y. W. C. A. NOTES. 

The subject "Art and Religion" was splendidly treated 
by Miss Knopf on February 28th. The wonderful influ- 
ence of art in religion was traced through the past and 
we were brought to the realization that the painter wor- 
ships God when he produces a masterpiece. 

Sunday, March 8th, Winifred Burmeister led the meet- 
ing. The subject, "What Is Religion?" was handled in 
a comprehensive and thoughtful manner. 

The Woman's Movement was the theme for March 
l5th. The slowly awakening and growing power of wo- 
manhood and the part that we as twentieth century wo- 
men have to play in this movement was shown. This 
meeting was conducted by Peril Hess. 

Mr. Hounschedd, a student volunteer secretary, visited 
the volunteer band March 12th. 

INDIANA CLUB. 

The usual jolly bunch of Hoosiers enjoyed a delicious 
waffle breakfast at the Peacock Inn on March 8th. 
Eighteen of the members, including our faculty member, 
Miss Johnston, were present. The conversation at the 
table was especially interesting since it concerned the dif- 
ferent routes the girls were to take on their way home for 
the Easter vacation. 

The Club is anxiously awaiting the opening of the 
picnic season. 

EGYPTIAN CLUB. 

The question "Where do you hve" was once upon a 
time an embarrassing question at I. W. C. if the answer 
was "Egypt." Why Egypt should ever have been a term 
of approbrium has always been a mystery and will prob- 
ably continue to remain so. That unhappy time is past, 
however, and to be an Egyptian now is an honor and de- 
light, not alone in the eyes of the loyal Egyptians but 

Page Eighteen 




tE^|)e College <!lreettns£( 




even in the eyes of rank outsiders. Every new organiza- 
tion at I. W. C. is prone to celebrate its beginning- by giv- 
ing a dinner. While the Egyptian Club hesitated to de- 
part from this worthy precedent in variety and length of 
menu, on the evening of March fourth it did establish a 
new precedent worthy of being followed by all who en- 
joyed the delights of well spread tables, well seasoned 
mirth and the happy proportion of talkers and listeners. 
The cheer that prevailed on that night was like that we 
find in our homes at the big family dinners. 




A. M. M. — "The Romans thought that onions were 
not aesthetic." 

P, W,, starting for her train — "Katherine, you missed 
it! I fell down the front stairs head first!" 

K, L., resentfully — "Yes, and you forgot my mother's 
flowers." 

R. M. — "Miss Walker, I do not understand about 
lockjaw." 

Miss W. — "There is some germ which causes the mus- 
cles to contract — " 

R, M. — "Yes, but does it lock open or shut? " 

Excited member of chorus for Antigone — "Do we 
have to hold on to that long note and keep step too? " 

Page Nineteen 




d)e CoUese #reetinsfi( 




F. H. — "I think the more we become educated the 
more we try to come in contact with the things that give 
pain, in order to overcome them." 

L. R. — "That's noble enjoyment, isn't it? " 

Helena M. — "Why, we were just inviting them as a 
condensation!" 

R. T, — "The use of 'in' in that sentence is superla- 
tive." 

M, L. P. — "In Latin you have sequence of tenses." 

K. L. (recovering from an operation for appendicitis) 
— "Mother, I had the 'nuttiest' ice cream for dinner." 

Mrs. L. — "Why, Katherine, don't you know you are 
not to eat nuts? " 

The most striking item in the rise of economic condi- 
tions in the Elizabethan age was the fact that the people 
had five kinds of meat for dinner," 

Miss McL., in chemistry class — "What is a hydro- 
plane? " 

K. G. — "Why, it's an areoplane run by hydrogen." 

Miss M., in English II — "Why do we have to suffer 
now for Adam's sins? " 

R. M. — "Well, if he hadn't sinned some one else 
would have." 

Miss J. — "Those ice cream kewpies are awfully cute, 
but I would feel like a cannibal eating them." 

As translated in French II — "He spoke in a tear- 
stained voice." 

A. M., in English history — "The war of the three 
Henrys in France was between three brothers, Henry I, 
Henry II, Henry III." 

Page Twentj 




Wift CoUese ^reettngs( 




Second Prep, worrying over a theme on "Progress" — 
"Won't you please tell me just two things that help us 
to get up in the world ? " 

Soph — "Sure. The alarm clock, and to have only 
six minutes in the morning before Dr. Harker gives the 
blessing." 

Miss Coultas, in German class — "Marie, Wer ist 
Balder?" 

Marie (meaning to say that he is a god) — "Balder 
ist ein goat." 

Miss C. — "If you do a thing nine hundred and ninety- 
nine times one way, why shouldn't you do it differently 
the one thousandth time? Now for instance, why should 
you do a thing nine hundred and ninety-nine days out of 
a year and not the other day? " 

Miss H., in Physics class — "Ila, give the laws of 
radiation." 

Ila — "Oh, oh, a homegeneous substance is in a 
straight line." 

M. S. — "In olden times people made the shrouds for 
their dead of asbestos. You know that's a good idea; it 
doesn't burn." 

Miss C, asking a question on the subject of emotion — 
"Is a deer more frightened when it is running or when it 
has been cornered ? " 

After a lengthy discussion by the class, 1. C. said — 
"Oh, I didn't know you were talking about an animal." 

Miss C. — "What kind of a deer did you think it was? " 

At cabinet meeting, 10:30 P. M. A. T. — "Ruth, 
how shall I know to whom to send this foreign money? " 

R. W. — "I don't know. I shall have to look in order 
to see." 

R. M. — "I never know whether to pronounce it 
P-tol'-emy or Pot'-elemy." 

Page Twentj-one 



fflWystyfwayMismaMgyy^pim^ /, 



®f)e College (Greetings! 




Miss McL, — "How would you test for the addition of 
sugar in condensed milk? " 

M. M. — "Why, I don't know; but I do know that too 
much sugar in milk causes infants to have rickets." 

After a lengthy discussion in Education on subjective 
and objective stimuli, Margaret G. said — "Punishment is 
objective, is it not? " 

- yf 

BELLES LETTRES. 

The programs this semester on the different countries 
of Europe and Asia have been splendid. Dorothy 
Stevens gave an interesting talk on Japanese art, and 
Miss Neville's talk on Constantinople was perfectly de- 
lightful. We could almost imagine ourselves in that fas- 
cinating city amidst all its richness and peculiar customs. 

The Tuesday after the initiation of our new members 
we were surprised upon going to the Hall to find two 
leather upholstered mission rockers, the gift of our new 
Belles Lettres girls. They certainly add to the coziness 
of our little informal gatherings which we often have in 
our hall. One of these affairs was a tea in honor of 
Dess Mitchell and Louise Gates, two of our "old" Belles 
Lettres. 

if 

THETA SIGMA. 

The annual Theta Sigma banquet was given at the 
Colonial Inn on Saturday evening, February the twenty- 
seventh. After the serving of the banquet, Irene Merrill, 
as toastmistress, called for the following toasts: 

Dry Toast — Helen McGhee. 

Quail on Toast — Marie Johnston. 

Buttered Toast — Ruth Clements. 

Rarebit on Toast — Ruth MendenhalL 

Hash on Toast — Ila Allen. 

Egg on Toast — Mary Baldridge. 

Page Twenty-two 




®|)C College (^reetingsf 




After the toasts we went into the music room where 
several musical numbers were rendered by Bonnie Derry 
and Winifred Sale, and Annie Floreth read "The Hazing 
of Valiant." Then several lively college songs were 
sung, ending with the Theta Sigma song. The pleasure 
of the evening was greatly enhanced by the presence of 
Mrs. Layton, Mrs. Metcalf, Dr. Marker, Miss Mothers- 
head and several former members. 

The Society has been bery g'lad to have as guests re- 
cently several former members: Hazel Hamilton, Mary 
Violett, Bonnie Derry, Ruth Clements, Mabel Larson and 
Mildred Seaman. 

Theta Sigma was entertained by Annie Floreth on 
Monday afternoon, March first, in honor of Ruth Clem- 
ents, a former member who is to be married in June. A 
mock kitchen shower provided a great deal of amusement. 

Helen McGhee, Edna Robb, May Bigger, Irene Mer- 
rill and Annie Floreth were entertained over a recent 
week end in Beardstown by three former members of the 
Society. 

Mrs. Floreth entertained the Society at a delightful 
surprise party on Monday evening, March fifteenth, in 
honor of Annie's birthday. 

The name of Ruth Patton was omitted from the list of 
new members in last month's number of the Greetings. 

ALUMNAE NOTES. 

The past month has brought announcements of the 
birth of sons to three of our I. W. C. women. 

In Fort Huachuca, Arizona, a little son was born on 
February 2 2nd to Lieutenant and Mrs. Tillson. His name 
is John Charles Fremont. Mrs. Tillson is Helen Lam- 
bert, class of '09. 

On February 17th was born to Mr. and Mrs. Horace 
A. Coleman, Palmyra, 111., a son, Frederick Walden. Mrs. 
Coleman was Jessica Arenz, class of '96. This is the 
second son, with three daughters, in the home. 

Page Twenty-three 




t!Di)e CoUege ^ttttiriQS 




On February l5th in Terre Haute, Ind., a son was 
born to Mr. and Mrs. John Lyle Pickering. Mrs. Pick- 
ering- as Katlierine Yates, eldest daughter of Governor 
Richard Yates, spent several years in the Woman's Col- 
lege, of which her grandfather, Mr. A. C. Wadsworth, was 
for forty years a trustee, 

Mrs. Mary Shepherd Kuhl, class of '67, has been act- 
ive in the work of the W. C. T. U. ever since its organiza- 
tion. As national superintendent of the evangelistic de- 
partment, Mrs. Kuhl has visited the principal cities in 
nearly every state of the union. Recently Mrs. Kuhl has 
removed from Champaign, 111, to 92 East Eleventh ave- 
nue, Columbus, Ohio, where she continues her work, 
much of it with her pen, in preparation of evangelistic 
studies and leaflets used in W. C. T. U. meetings. Among 
the many leaflets is one of character sketches which in- 
cludes about fifty women of the old and new Testament. 
Another one is on nature studies in the Bible. In a charm- 
ing way it takes up the scripture references to objects and 
phenomena of the natural world — the stars, sun, clouds, 
rain, rivers, deserts, mountains and hills, the birds, flow- 
ers, and many other things that are given in the literature 
of the Bible. 

Miss Geneva Upp has been re-elected to her position 
in the high school at Lakota, N. Dakota, with an increase 
in salary. 

Miss Anna Shipley, formerly a member of the class 
of '14, is in the training school of the Morton hospital at 
Taunton, Mass. 

Miss Kate Blackburn of the class of '83, who for 
many years has been the principal of the American Girls' 
School in Lovetch, Bulgaria, has recently returned to her 
home near Jacksonville. She tells an interesting story 
of her return trip as they traveled the entire distance with- 
out lights. We are hoping that "our Miss Blackburn" 
will soon speak to us. 

Mrs. Phebe Kreider Murray, class of '90, writes from 
Los Angelos that there will be a meeting of the California 

Page Twenty-four 



i 




^f)e College ^xtttin^i 



1. W. C. Society in April at the home of the president, 
Mrs. Parthenia Harrison. Mrs. Grace Wood Jess, '98, 
will sing and other plans M^hich are under way will insure 
as always a good time for the Golden State girls of Illinois 
Woman's College. Mrs. Murray, Mrs. Jess, and Miss 
Farley, a former teacher in the College, in a recent auto 
trip visited the exposition in San Diego, which they found 
unique, charming and different from all other expositions 
held in recent years. In San Diego a call was made on 
Mrs. Nettie Portersfeld Sargent, class of '89. Her 
daughter who is yet in high school looks forward to col- 
lege days in her mother's Alma Mater in her native state. 
She will be eligible for membership in the Kinship Klub 
through more than one clansman. 

It was an oversight that the following announcement 
did not appear in a previous issue: Born to Mr, and Mrs. 
Albin Keys, in Springfield, 111., January 29, a daughter, 
Louise. Mrs. Keys was formerly Miss Helen Lewis. 

EXCHANGES. 

What has been the theme for the various editorials 
this month? It is a tie between "Show Your Loyalty, 
Buy Your Share of Stock in the College Paper, and Get 
One Hundred Per Cent Dividends!" and "Away With 
the Bugaboo, No Time for This, Too Busy for That." 
These two watchwords seem to be common to every 
school. Probably the time of the year has something to 
do with it. Now all classes are trying to get the heavy 
work done before the "spring complaint" appears; organi- 
zations have all hands on deck for the end of the year's 
journey is in sight and much is still undone; even pleasure 
makes a more insistent demand, if possible, and where 
are people to be found to do all those write-ups.^ Many 
a paper has taken refuge in contests of various sorts and 
mostly with great success. 

The Augustana Observer's new cover on the Febru- 
ary number, the result of a sucessful contest, is quite pleas- 
Pa^ Twenty-five 



W^t CoUege ^vtttin^s 




ing, an adjective also appropriate for the material within 
the cover. The article "Washington's Neutrality Procla- 
mation and Wilson's" is well written and very interesting. 

The March Pegasus has some good editorials on Sys- 
tematized Time. A remedy for the "no time" complaint 
v/ould prove very valuable and at least well worth trying. 

"A Revelation," in the Western Oxford, has the note 
of reality, a characteristic so valuable in good story tell- 
ing. Their statistics on the reading done by seniors are 
illuminating to say the least. It is to be deplored that the 
"butterfly habit of reading" is so current among college 
girls. 




Page Twenty-six 



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= 


i AT 


shoes and Party Slippers 


1 


1 Russell & Lyon's 

Oldest Established Jewelers 
in Central Illinois 


in the popular styles, 

leathers, and 

fabrics 


1 
1 


Both Phones 96 




1 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Member State and National Associations 



McCULLOUGH STUDIO 



EAST SIDE SQUARE 



(§rapi)ic 
Concern 



printers, ^ufalisifjerg, ^tationerg 



ENGRAVED CARDS . 

ARTISTIC PROGRAMS 
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



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I For those who discriminate 

I We simply suggest that it has been our constant effort to 

I please the students who come to our city. We select only the 

I Ijest materials and prepare them with skilfull loving care. 
I Pure Candies, Hot and cold Soda, Brick Ice Cream and 

I Plain and Decorated Birthday Cakes. 

I Telephone 227. All packages delivered. We cater for all 

I College functions. 

Vickery 3c Merrigan 



OAXERERS 



227 W. State St. 



|Both Phones 309 



I SAFEST PLACE TO TRADE 

IfjlLLERBY'^ 

I DRY GOODS STORE 



West Side Square 



Brady Bros. 

Everything* in Hardware, 
House-furnishing's and Paints 

45-47 South Side Square 



I C* V* Frankcnberg 

I Ladies' and Gents' Tailoring 
I Cleaning, Altering, 

I Repairing 

I Improved Machinery, 



Best Work 
215 East State Street 



Established 1890 




^i'" fV.C.TS.a.Vv'Vi./.f". fJLSm 



how Prices Square Dealing 
Keep us busy 

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flIiuUenix & Ibamilton 

Contecttonere 



CLKANIylNESS 



SERVICE 



QUALITY 



Creams, Ices, Frappes, Sundaes, Sodas, Parfaits, 

Mousses and all Hot Drinks 

Home-made Candies and Salted Nuts 

The Store of Merit 



Phones 70 



216 East State Street 



Why pay more for no more? 

Let us sell you SHOES 

It means more spending money 
for you 

We cater to your wants 



The Popular Price East State Street 
Shoe Man 

WE REPAIR SHOES 



1. M. BUNCE 6i Co. 



211 East Morgan Street 



Designs, Cut Flowers, 
Plants 

Southwest Corner Square 

Greenhouses, South Diamond St. 

Store: Bell Phone 154, 111. 182 

Greenhouses, Bell 775 

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McGINNIS' i 

The Yottng Ladies' Shoe Store | 

We carry a full line of Evening Slippers| 
in all colors. | 

If it's new, we have it I 

JAS. McGINNIS & CO I 

East Side Square | 

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I 



Want 

Cut flowers 

FROM 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

Both Phones 




You will find a complete line of 

FANCY GROCERIES 

at 

Walker's Grocery 

Home Cooking: a Specialty 

Both Phones 205 E. Morgan Stree 



Job Printing 

Of All Kinds 

John K* Long 

Engfraved Cards and Invitations 



213 West Morgan Street 
Illinois Phone 400 



I Dorwart Market 

I ALL KINDS OF 

|FRESH and SALT MEATS 
I FISH, POULTRY, Etc. 

iBoth phones 196 230 W. State St. 



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KODAK FINISHING 

Vulcan Roll Films 

Cameras from $2.00 up 
Everything" strictly first class 

Vail & Vail 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 B. Side Sq. 



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MoIIenbrock & McCuIIoiigh 



SUCCESSORS TO 



McDougall's Studio 



234i West State Street 



Illinois Phone 808 



"The Home of the Crispette" 

The Sanitary Pop-corn 
and Crispette Shop 

Pop-corn that melts in your mouth 
Roasted and 5alted Peanuts 

East State Street 



Gate Bat5 


H. J. & Iv. M. SMITH 




an^ annex tor Xat)ie0 


Art Needle Work 






and Millinery 




221-223 Bast State Street 








211 West state Street 




Illinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 













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I Phones 800 

I ROBERTS BROS. 

I DRUGS AND GROCERIES 

I We guarantee every purchase 
I and delivery or money 

I back 

I ROBERTS BROS. 

I 29 South Side Square Phones 800 



S. S Kresge Co. 

5c & IOC Store 

A popular place for College 
Girls 



The Store tor 



[DRESS GOODS AND SIIvKS 



J ^J^f^ 



DRY GOODS STORE 



Kodak Shop 



A. H. Atherton & Son 



Under Farrell's Bank 



We Develop and Print Promptly 



I E. A. SCHOEDSACK 

I Proprietor of 

I City Steam Dye Works 

I Dry Cleaning of Fancy 

I Waists and Dresses 

I a Specialty 

I 230 Ea»t State St. JackBonville, 111. 
I lUinoisJPhone 388 

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Ideal Bread 

is better 
so are the Cakes 



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Visit I 

SCHRAM'S I 

Jewelry Store | 

We have good-looking and good-wearing goods | 

Will be pleased to show them [ 



All the Faculty, Students and Friends 
of the College should have a Checking 
or Savings Account with 

F. G. FARRELL & CO. 

BANKERS 

F. F. Farrell, President 

F. F. Crabtree, Vice-President 

H. H. Potter, Cashier 

M. W. Osborne, Asst. Cashier 



T AYLOR'S l 

Grocery 

A good place to trade j 
221 West State Street 



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The lyatest in 

College Jewelry, Society 

Stationery, Bracelet 

Watches, Silver and 

Cut Glass 

AT 

BASSETT'S 

21 South Side Square 



Piepenbrings Variety Store 

One block east of College 

HKRE TO PLEASE 

Candies Cakes 

Cookies ' Pies 

Sandwiches Pop on Ice 

Groceries California Fruits 
School Suppiies 



C. J. Deppe & Co. 

Known for "Ready-TO- 

wear" and Popular 

Priced Dry Goods 




BROTHe 



R? 



Jacksonville's foremost Store for Men 
and Specialties for Women 

Mannish Sweaters 

Mackinaw Coats, KnittedToques 

Mannish Rain Coats and Hats 

Trunks and Handbags 



Ladies* Late Style Furs 



ARE SOI,D BY 



Frank Byrns ^** 



Store 



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Cherry's Livery 

Finest Light and Heavy 

Livery 

Lowest Rates 

235-237, 302-304-306 North Main Stie«t 
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Confectionary 

Kbeacock Inn 



Catering- 



Soda 



Len G. Magill 



Printer 



East State Street 111. Phone 41S 



Candies 



GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 



SHEET MUSIC, MUSICAL MERCHANDISE | 

TALKING MACHINES, RECORDS | 

AND SUPPLIES I 

19 SOUTH SIDE PUBIvIC SQUARE | 

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EVERYTHING ANTnPF ^ ANHPF EVERYTHING 
for the home /^.I^I^IVL^ *^ /Al^LflVi-* for the home 

STUDENTS 

Headquarters for Room Furnishings 

The Best Goods at the Price, no matter what the Price 

ANDRE & ANDRE 



THE GIFT 
STORE 



THE GIFT 
STORE 



Dr. Albyn IvIncoIvN Adams 




OCCULIST AND AURIST 




to the State School for the Blind 


DR. ALPHA B. APPLEBE^E 


323 West State Street 


Dentist 


Practice limited to diseases of the 




Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 






326 Wes* State St. 


Both Telephones 




We will pipe your house for 




GAS 


DR. A. C. KINGSLEY 


or wire it for 

ELECTRICITY 


DENTIST 


1 at cost 


409 Ayers National Bank Bldgt 


1 Jacksonville l^ailway & 

1 Light Company 


Both Phones 760 


i Two years to pay 224 S. Main St. 




1 

^riiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 





HiiiNiiiHiiiiiiiMniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiniiiHiiiiiiiimniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimMimmiiniiimnmiiiMiimiiiiMiiniiiMiiMiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiniiniiiiiiinH^ 

COLLEGE GIRLS: | 

See our Motor Coats, Mackinaws and Sweaters | 

Also Ladies' Holeproof Hosiery | 

LUKEMAN BROTHERS I 



Girls^ Patronize Our Advertisers 



Ayers National Bank 

Foanded 1852 



Capital 
^200,000 

SurplusI 
^50,000 

Deposits 
^2,000,000 



III 

(• ■ I, > 







United States 
Depository 

Postal Savings 
Depository 

Member of 

Federal 

Reserve Bank 






LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
Special Window for Ladies 
Ladies' Waiting- Room 
We make a feature of Ladies' Accounts, and have 
provided facilities for their exclusive use 

OFFICERS 
M.F. Dunlap, President O. F. Buffe, Cashier 

ndrew Russel, Vice President R. C. Reynolds, Asst. Cashier 

K . M. Hockenhull, Vice President H. C Clement, Asst. Cashier 

i. has. B. Graff, Vice President W. G. Goebel, Asst. Cashier 

H. J. Rodgers, Vice President H. K. Cheuoweth, Asst. Cashier 

Arthur Vannier, Assistant Cashier 



Owen P. Thompson 
Edward F. Goltra 
John W. Leach 



DIRECTORS 
George Deitrick 
R. M. Hockenhull 
M. F. Dunlap 



Harry M. Capps 
O. F. Buffe 
Andrew Russel 



diiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiuiiiiuiiiiiiilKiMiiniiiMiiiiMiiuiiiiiniiiMiiiiiiUMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiinii^ 




Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 

Erected 1850 



Exteneion 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

I College of LiberalArts 

I College of Music 

I School of Fine Arts 

I School of Expression 

I School of Home Economics 

I A Standard College — 

I Regular college and academy courses 

I leading to Bachelor's degree. Pre-em- 

1 inently a Christian college with every 

I facility for thorough work. Located 

I in the Middle West, in a beautiful, 

i dignified, old college town, noted for 

I its literary and music atmosphere. 

I Let us have names of your friends 

I who are looking for a good college. 

I Call or address, Registrar 

i Illinois Woman's College, 

I Jacksonville, 111. 




^iiiiiiiiinniiiiiiniiMniintinntiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiHHMiiiHiiiiiiiiHmiHtiiHHiiiiHitiiHiiimiiiHiiunmiimHiHiiiiiHiwHiwitmiMimiiitHiwmimmwimiHm 



Z!rt)e College (Greetings: 

€|f The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of the Illinois Woman's College. 

€|| Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due 
the fifteenth of each month. 

€j| Subscriptions, $i.oo a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies, 15c. 
€[} Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 

Contents 

Editorial 3 

Juanita .4 

In Quest of Willie ... 9 

College of Music 13 

Home Economics 15 

Expression 16 

Art 17 

Antigone i'^ 

Junior Journal 19 

Sophomores 20 

A Survey 22 

College Specials 24 

Academy 24 

Student's Association 26 

The Boosters' Committee 27 

Athletic Association 28 

Y. W. C. A, . 29 

An Interesting Comparison 31 

German Club 32 

Indiana Club 32 

Dramatic Club 33 

Society Notes 33 

Alumnae Notes 34 

Locals 36 

THt 

Graphig^rts 
Concern 



ILbe College (3reetmQ6 



Vol. XVIII Jacksonville, III., May, 1915 No- 8 



Faculty Advisor — Miss Mary Anderson. 

Editor-in-Chief — Helena Munson. 

Associate and Alumnae Editor — Winifred Burmeister. 

Assistant Editors — Helen McGhee, Elaine Buhrman. 

Art Editor — Dorothy Stevens. 

Business Manager — Audrey Berryman. 

Assistant Business Managers — Alma Harmel, Mary Harrison. 



EDITORIAL 

With the writing- of this editorial the year's duties as 
an editor have almost drawn to a close. A backward 
look seems the most natural thing. In this issue an in- 
complete review of the year has been written with the 
hopes that it may help to fix a little more definitely the 
memories of the year, to show the advance of the year, 
and in so doing in some little way to stimulate a desire for 
and vision of yet greater things. 

If you think I. W. C. hasn't grown, look over this 
number of the Greetings. Every organization reports 
something accomplished of what they planned in the fall, 
some step made in advance. Every department is a little 
bigger, more comprehensive, than before. If your blood 
has never tingled before because of the conscientiousness 
of growth, throw yourself, with all the enthusiasm which 
spring gives, into some activity and be convinced that 
things have been growing. There's no denying that we 
have a school of which to be proud, so let's one and all 
give nine cheers for the College, our dear old I. W. C. 

Page Three 



Wi)t CoUege ^reetingse 



With this reahzation of the glories of the past, let us 
press on to still better things. Let us never rest until we 
have THE largest woman's college of the West, the most 
progressive in the land. Now is one of the best times to 
work for such a future, when new girls are looking for a 
school. Again we say, make your summer count! Your 
enthusiasm will have great influence with your friends. 



JUANITA. 

A torrid Phillipine sun rose one oppressive morning 
in July, 1905, and bent all its energies upon further parch- 
ing the cracked earth. Its light filtered through the split 
bamboo curtain of a little hut out on Marjo street in the 
town of Malco, Luzon, and disturbed the slumbers of an 
American. Anybody would know he was an American 
both from his size and from the fact that he wore pajamas, 
the night dress of his fatherland, even if he was burnt the 
color of a native. The tropical sun had added a walnut- 
mahogany finish to a naturally dark skin. I could hardly 
imagine, as he appeared on the veranda and slouched 
against a post with an aimless air, that he had been con- 
sidered the model soldier in a certain crack regiment in 
the United States cavalry only two years before. 

Three times, I knew, Roger Graves had been deco- 
rated for conspicuous bravery on the battlefield. He 
had been told that if he would acquire the preliminary 
knowledge, he would be recommended for a commission. 
For several months he worked when he had the time. 
He was a Sophomore at Leland Stanford Jr. University 
when some boyish deviltry had brought expulsion and he 
had enlisted to get away from an incensed father. But 
before he took the examination the crack Seventeenth 
was ordered to Luzon. Certain wielders of the bolo had 
made themselves obstreperous and to the Seventeenth 
was assigned the pleasant duty of exterminating them or 
making them good Filpiinoes. 

Page Four 




^f}t College (greetingff 




That evening- in tiie old sergeant's tent I sat staring 
straigiit out into the jungle. 'l"he sun was sinking be- 
hind the low hills to the right. Already the cold damp 
fog was rising from the grass and the green parrots scold- 
ed and fussed in their roosts. The monkeys chattered 
and their peculiar screeches rang out. The scene had 
great fascination to a newcomer, but it did not prevent 
my thoughts from going back to the beautiful old town of 
Maderro, on the eastern slope of the Seirra Madres in Cal- 
ifornia, and a straight, stern-faced old gentleman and an 
elderly lady on the veranda of a beautiful white house at 
the town's edge. I knew they were bent down by secret 
woe and that their eyes were turned that very night to the 
southwest where the Union Pacific came through the 
Ceneras Pass. In my reveries 1 pictured the grief and 
sorrow the two old people would feel when 1 would have 
to make my report, and 1 could see the old gentleman's 
proud features wince when he learned that which 1, his 
special envoy, was duty bound to tell. 

I remembered the little bareheaded boy that scamp- 
ered about the streets of Maderro, leader of the boys in 
his neighborhood, then 1 pictured him as he appeared the 
night he graduated from high school, straight and clean. 
I was editor of the Maderro Record at the time. 1 heard 
of him at Berkley and his work on the gridiron, then I 
heard of the hazing of freshmen and his suspension. The 
last time 1 saw him, he came into my copy room of the 
Chronicle in San Francisco, and leaning against the desk, 
said: 

"Tom, loan me a hundred, I'm going to Tampa." 

1 would have sold the shirt off my back to help the 
son of that stern old man who used to buy his papers of 
a certain ragmuffin in Maderro, then too he was the son 
of the sweet faced old lady who used to call me into her 
kitchen and feed me, when often 1 had spent the previous 
night in an ashbarrel. 

Page Fiv« 




Cije College (jlreetingsi 



The sergeant came in from the corrall and pulled up a 
chair and sat down. 

"It's a long- tale," he said after lighting his pipe and 
leaning back, for he knew why 1 was waiting there. 

"We had landed in Manila and were about as sullen 
as men get. That night after guard mount most of us 
who were free to do so got camp leave and walked over 
to Heurjuo, a town of about seven thousand Spanish and 
French inhabitants and twice that number of half breeds 
and Filpiinos. We all drank some of that stuff called 
mescal and started out to see the town. We saw it all 
right, but when we started for camp, Roger Graves was 
not with us. That night he sneaked guard lines and 
crawled into his blankets about four in the morning 
Three nights later he deserted guard post and his neigh- 
boring sentry knew it, but never reported. Roger was 
acting very queerly. He refused the examination. His 
term of enlistment was almost up and we all supposed 
he was going back to the States. A few weeks later he 
announced that he was going to quit. The captain 
wanted to know the trouble, but Roger answered that it 
wasn't anybody's business, that he would be nobody's, 
hound any more. The captain thought the heat had 
queered the man, so turned to his desk and wrote a check 
for ninety dollars. 'Come with me. Graves, and we'll 
talk it over with the colonel,' he said. The colonel took 
the news calmly and filled out the necessary documents 
to refer the case to the division commandment. The 
next day Graves got his discharge. 

"We all suspected there was a girl in the case, but 
did not know for sure. That afternoon Roger Graves, 
one of California's finest families, married Juanita in the 
mission church at Malaola. This girl was half native and 
half Spanish, and beautiful as these mixed bloods often 
are. She had eyes like black pansies and her dark oval 
face was alight with intelligence, for she had been edu- 
cated in a French convent. She was taller than the gen- 
Page Six 




Cfje College (jlreetmgjf 




eral run of Filipino girls and she had a madonna appear- 
ance, but appearance only. She hated Gringoes or 
whites as only her race" can. Her Spanish ancestry was 
responsible for her intelligence, and that strain of Filipino 
that led her little brown brothers to chop our sentries to 
mince meat was responsible for the tortures she later sub- 
jected Roger to. 

"Well, to state it briefly, about three days later Roger 
was captured by some bolo men and carried off to the 
hills. Juanita herself brought the news. 

"Company D was ordered into the saddle and gave 
chase, but the trail was' hours old. 

"The rainy season let up in June, we shifted camp, 
and occupied a high position in the southwest of the island 
behind a small stream. A plain lay between the jungle 
and us. The tall grass was the only thing the bolors 
could hide in and we soon burned that off. In all my 
Philippine campaigns I never saw a better camp. 

"One day one of the troopers came back from town 
and said Juanita had left. The only comment was that 
the informant was teased about his design in going around 
to offer consolation to the widow. 

"At three o'clock Monday morning five hundred Fil- 
ippinos rose up, seemingly from the bare earth, and start- 
ed for the sleeping soldiers. It was revolver against 
bolo. We beat them back with a loss, mounted, and 
gave chase as far as we could push our horses. After 
taps that evening young Chalmers came and sat on my 
bunk and told me he had seen Graves among the natives 
as they took to the jungle. I saw through it all. The 
poor fellow, probably a little touched with the heat, and 
crazy about dusky Juanita, had raised his hand against 
the United States. The two months that followed were 
a constant round of skirmishes. Aguinaldo's little rebel- 
lion was not a circumstance to what our Roger showed 
us. Bolos and fever got in their deadly work. The ene- 
my was learning to shoot with our rifles. 

Page Seven 



Eljc CoUege (greetings! 

"Time after time we were aroused by our pickets as 
a covey of Brownies rose from tlie jungle like a covey of 
quail and sailed into us. Only a Springfield bullet would 
stop them, 

"On the fifteenth of August an envoy with a flag of 
truce was escorted to the colonel's tent. After the weaz- 
ened brown scamp saluted in accepted military style, he 
proceeded to relate that General Senor Graves demanded 
that the Gringoes leave the island or surrender. 

"As soon as the colonel could get his breath he sent 
his compliments to Graves and told the messenger to tell 
him to come in to be hanged within twenty-four hours or 
the Americans would sweep the island clean. The Filip- 
pino departed with a jaunty air. In an hour he was back 
with, a letter from Graves who asked to be granted im- 
munity from punishment as a deserter and he would sur- 
render. 

"The colonel called all the captains into a consultation 
and they were for refusing any such proposition, but re- 
membrances of what Graves had done soon altered and 
softened their views. Captain Jameson of Company L 
said, 'Graves carried me on his back for half a mile the 
day that piece of shrapnel hit me, but for that I would 
have bled to death before 1 could have reached a sur- 
geon.' 

"The colonel himself remembered a little affair in 
Tahate where a native with a raised knife suddenly 
crumpled up and fell beneath him. The colonel allowed 
his mind to wander to that hot May morning in '98 in 
Tampa, where he had first seen Graves, where two bullies 
of the Seventeenth had found themselves no match for 
the white faced recruit who had been the amateur cham- 
pion boxer of the Pacific slope and the best half back that 
had worn a head gear for Stanford in the last decade. 
From that day he was the pride of the Seventeenth, and 
in the six years he had been with the army he had proved 
what he was made of. 

Page Eight 



^i)t College (§reet(ng« 



"The council room was a mighty quiet place as those 
stern officers reviewed what they had seen and heard of 
Graves. Pretty soon the colonel spoke, his voice was 
hard and metallic, "Why can't we take him at his terms? ' 
The captains thought the same thing but were afraid to 
say so. 

"That evening Roger and his wife came in. He car- 
ried no arms, and we afterward found he had had never 
fired a shot at our troops." 

"So they came in," I ejaculated, "and to what?" 
Did you ever think, colonel, that a bullet might have been 
better?" 

Ruth Patton, '16. 

IN QUEST OF WILLIE. 

The sun was slowly sinking behind the shelter of the 
woodland hills when Miss Lucy came home. She was 
returning from an interesting and exciting shopping ex- 
pedition at the city. The results of Miss Lucy's shopping 
trips were not only very interesting to herself but equally 
so to the members of the whole community in which Miss 
Lucy had lived since her girlhood. 

She carefully unlocked the door, then cautiously 
crossed the threshold. To be sure, Miss Lucy had lived 
alone for twelve years, long years they seemed to her, 
but in all that time she had never been able to conquer 
that fear she felt upon returning to her cottage after a 
lengthy absence. She always crossed the threshold cau- 
tiously, for, as she herself reasoned, other women had 
big, strong men to protect them, but she had no one, no 
one but her big gray cat, Willie. Now, although Willie 
was a very companionable cat, a very lovable cat, he was 
not. a protection, and then too one might as well be care- 
ful, she had read of things in the papers. 

After a careful survey, she was assured that no tres- 
passers had violated the premises. With a sigh of relief 

Page Nine 




Cfje CoUege (flreetingg 




she deposited her array of bundles upon the table. There 
is something peculiarly satisfying about a large assort- 
ment of neatly tied bundles, especially when one has 
bought and paid for them. Miss Lucy eagerly opened the 
largest and most important bundle of all. "Oh, it is so 
pretty! But what will the Ladies' Aid say when they see 
me come out in a pink silk ? I suppose it is rather young- 
ish, but I've always wanted a pink silk like this. Why, 
I was going to be married in a pink silk. Yes, 1 shall have 
it made up. The Ladies' Aid can talk if they want to, 
and I've noticed they generally want to." She tossed 
her head independently as she put away her hat and coat. 
Miss Lucy could be very independent when the Ladies' 
Aid was far away. "Yes, I shall have it made up, and I 
shall have a pink rose on my hat. William always liked 
pink roses. Yes, Wil — O dear, that must have been a 
knock." With one despairing backward glance at the 
table Miss Lucy hastened to the door, 

"Oh, how-di-do! Why, it's Annabel, isn't it. Well, 
was there anything you wanted, Annabel?" 

"Yes ma-am, Miss Lucy, I wanted to come in." And 
Annabel came in. Annabel, clad in a stiffly starched blue 
gingham, appeard a very sweet and unobtrusive child, 
that is, she appeared to be, but appearances, as Miss Lucy 
had learned to her sorrow, were frequently deceiving, 
and then Annabel had her mother's eyes. They were 
very much in evidence as she seated herself in one of Miss 
Lucy's big chairs directly behind the bundle-covered table. 
"Well, ain't we been havin' nice weather lately. Miss 
Lucy?" 

"Yes, very nice." 

"Um — nice weather for going to town." 

"Yes — yes — I — I s'pose your mother is going to the 
Aid meeting tomorrow?" 

"Umhuh. She told me to say something about t'hat. 
Say, it kinda looks as tho' you had been to town. Mamma 
said she thought it was you. 'Spect you saw lots of gro- 

Page Ten 




^f)E College (greetinss; 



ceries at the stores, lots of gum groceries and candy gro- 
ceries, I mean. Oh, no. Mamma said you always got 
your groceries at Montgomery Ward's store, don't you, 
Miss Lucy? " 

"Yes, Annabel." 

"But mamma said she s'posed you'd be buying lots of 
fine clothes now." 

"Why, Annabel?" 

"Cause Mr. William Carter has come back. Mamma 
said that when you was a young girl you was a goin' to 
marry Mr. William Carter, but your folks wouldn't let 
you. My, 1 just bet you if I wanted to marry Mr. William 
Carter I just would anyhow, 'cause Mr. William Carter 
is rich, he is. Oh! Miss Lucy, I just bet you don't know 
what my papa says. My papa is such a funny man. 
Miss Lucy, honest Injun now, did you truly name that big 
tom cat of yours after Mr. William Carter' " 

"Why — why, you ain't sick, are you, Miss Lucy? 
Why, you look just like mamma does when she has a 
headache. You ain't sick, are you, Miss Lucyj" " 

Miss Lucy truly did look ill; she recovered herself with 
an effort. "No — Oh! on, child. Just tired. Now that 
you speak of it 1 remember my poor Willie cat hasn't had 
his supper. 1 haven't seen him since I've come home. 
It's getting dark, isn't it' Time for children — I might 
go a little ways with you, Annabel." 

As Annabel neared the door which Miss Lucy had 
opened for her, she turned for one last long look at the 
table. "Say, Miss Lucy, you see that pink a-stickin' out 
from undernearth that paper, is that sateen or silk ' You 
see, mamma will want to know." 

Miss Lucy's blue eyes flashed with indignation. She 
spoke slowly and distinctly. "You may tell your mother, 
Annie-bell, that is is pink silk and that 1 am going to have 
a dress made out of it, and that 1 am not going to the 
Ladies' Aid meeting tomorrow, she will have to find a 
ride with somebody else. Now, good night!" 

Page Eleven 



y^ 



^i)e CoSese (Greetings! 




"Good night," said Annabel. A very subdued Anna- 
bel went home. 

She had left Miss Lucy, however, in an entirely differ- 
ent mood. Her anger, righteous as it had been, was only 
a sham to cover a deeper feeling. As she walked slowly 
about her yard in search of her pet cat, her thoughts were 
with the joys and sorrows of her girlhood. "He hasn't 
come back, I know he hasn't come back. It's too good 
to be true. Her mother just put her up to say it. It's 
like her, never minding her own business. If folks could 
take a lesson from my Willie, even if he is a cat, they'd 
be a lot more agreeable to neighbor with. But I wonder 
where he can be. Willie! Willie! Willie!" No faint 
meow broke the stillness of the gathering gloom. "He 
must have gone into those woods and got caught in those 
awful Smith boys' traps! Oh, dear! O dear! It's get- 
ting late, but I'll light my lantern. I'm not afraid 
anyhow." 

She returned to the cottage, lighted her lantern and 
started swiftly in the direction of the woods. A great 
calm had fallen over the timberland, a hush as though all 
nature were listening. Miss Lucy's timid footsteps made 
bold sounds among the startled leaves. Ordinarily she 
would never have ventured even with the friendly aid of 
the lantern, but tonight she had little idea of fear. 

"Oh, 1 must find him. O if I should lose Willie! 
Willie, Willie, Willie, Willie, Willie, Willie!" The sound 
of her own voice gave her fresh courage. She walked 
further into the gloomy depths of the woods. "Willie, 
Willie, Willie, Willie, Willie, Willie!" She was ap- 
proaching the old oak tree where in happier years she 
had been accustomed to meet young William Carter, 
How swiftly her feet had flown down the old path. Then 
life had been joyous, blithe and free. But now — 

"Whooooo! whooooo! whooo ooo ooo!" 

"Oh dear! Oh! Oh dear! Only a little screech owl 
all alone just like me. I've heard them all my life but 



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tE^f)t College (greetings! 



they do startle one. And my lantern gone out — Willie 
lost. Oh! 1 must find Willie. 1 can't go back alone, 
Willie! Willie! Willie!" 

''Yes, Lucy, I'm coming. Don't be afraid, little girl." 
William Carter emerged from the shadow of the old oak 
tree. 

Perhaps it was because of the great fright which Miss 
Lucy had undergone, perhaps it was because of the asso- 
ciations of former years, but whatever it was, without 
hesitation Miss Lucy accepted the shelter of two protecting 
arms even as in the days of old. 

"Oh, William, William! It's true, then, you have 
come back!" 

"Oh, little girl, — to think, to dream that 1 should find 
you in the same old place! Lucy, little girl, I've come 
and I'm going back again if you will go with me." 

"Yes, William." Miss Lucy did not bemoan the loss 
of the lantern at that moment. 

"Meaow, meaow, meaow," 

"Why — Oh! there's Willie. I had forgotten. Come, 
kitty, kitty, kitty!" 

"This is my cat, Willie — perhaps you heard me call 
him. I thought he was lost, but now I've found you 
both." 

"We're both your possessions." 

"And I'm so happy, William. I'm right glad I got 
that pink silk." 

"The what?" 

"You'll see that later, William," she said, as she 
walked slowly homeward with William Carter at her side. 
Willie, the cat, followed meekly. In the heart of Miss 
Lucy there was a great peace. 

Lavina Jones, '18. 

>^ 
COLLEGE OF MUSIC. 

The College of Music has taken a long step forward 
in arranging- for the granting- of a degree of Bachelor of 

Page Thirteen 



^f)C College (Greetings 



Music on the same basis as the Bachelor of Arts degree in 
the College of Liberal Arts, namely, that of one hundred 
and twenty hours credit. By doing this it places itself in 
the front rank of progressive schools of music, recogniz- 
ing the necessity for a broad education as well as an ex- 
tensive music education. The students enrolling for this 
degree have the same classification as students for the A. 
B. degree and must present the same entrance require- 
ments. 

On Thursday afternoon, April 15, occurred the grad- 
uating recital of Miss Ima Berryman, senior in voice and 
a pupil of Mrs. Hartmann. Miss Berryman 's work was 
a thorough understanding of the material presented, and 
characterized by beauty of tone, good vocal production, 
a charming stage presence. She was ably assisted at the 
piano by Miss Deane Obermeyer. 

For the first time in three years the College has had 
an orchestra and all year this organization with about 
twenty players has met on Thursday evenings for re- 
hearsal under Mr. Stearns' direction. A number of stan- 
dard works for orchestra have been studied and very sat- 
isfactory progress has been made. The orchestra will 
be heard in a concert before the end of the year, as well 
as assisting at one or two events. 

This year the college has supported two Glee Clubs. 
Though not departmental, the clubs have been under the 
leadership of members of the College of Music faculty, 
Miss Miller training the College Glee Club and Miss De- 
muth the Academy Glee Club. 

The Madrigal Club has appeared a number of times 
with unvarying success. They have sung at the Sunday 
evening vesper services at the college, at the evening- 
services of Grace Methodist, Centenary Methodist and the 
First Presbyterian and at the charity tea for the benefit 
of Passavant Hospital at Grace church. The club num- 
bers about twenty girls and has met regularly for rehears- 

Page Fourteen 



tlTije College (greetings 



als under Mr. Stearns' direction on Friday afternoon at 
4:20. 

The College of Music is looking forward to a largely 
increased enrollment next year. The course leading to 
the degree of Bachelor of Music is meeting with enthus- 
iastic response from many who are planning to attend 
school here. A number of new courses have been added 
to the curriculum and the certificate course in musical 
proficiency has been revised and strengthened. The fac- 
ulty have been heard in a number of concerts in the sur- 
rounding towns, as well as in a number of appearances 
in Jacksonville, everywhere meeting- with great success. 



HOME ECONOMICS. 

The interest shown in the Home Economics Depart- 
ment typifies the general atmosphere of the college. For 
the appreciation of this department found among all of 
the girls is shown by the vivacious chatter which floats 
down the long corridors to the silent observer. Home 
Economics is not an exclusive course, for many girls who 
are majoring the Liberal Art courses are also taking the 
various subjects of this department. 

New equipment is continually being added, which al- 
ways leads to more efficient work. One new and very 
profitable development of the work in the Domestic Sci- 
ence is the demonstrations which the advanced students 
are handling effectually. Practical subjects are used such 
as meat substitutes, vegetables, beverages, croquettes and 
deserts. The embroidery and millinery has been made a 
separate course in the Household Art this year and thus 
more time and interest can be given to them. Much more 
emphasis has been placed upon practice teaching and the 
girls have entered into this work most heartily since it 
affords them experience as well as confidence in their 
ability to competently plan work for others. 

Page Fifteen 




W\)t College (Greetings! 



An organization destinct from all other social organ- 
izations of the college was formed this year and since it 
was a result of this department it received the name of 
"The Home Economics Club." The purpose of the club 
is to study certain topics of special interest which cannot 
be taken up in the various classes. A few of the very 
interesting topics have been: canning clubs, extension 
work, farmers' institute work, school luncheons, garden- 
ing, school gardens and the beautifying of country school 
grounds. The girls have entered enthusiastically in all 
of the phases of the development of the club, as shown 
by the lively stunt which they gave directly after the 
club was organized and the active interest portrayed at 
all the regular meetings. 

Dulcie F. Godlove. 

EXPRESSION NOTES. 

The advanced students of the Expression Department 
were heard in a recital on Monday evening, April 19th, at 
8 o'clock. The selections were most enjoyable and show- 
ed marked improvement as a result of the year's work. 
The following program was given: 
The School of Squeers Charles Dickens 

Lavina Jones 
Too Late for the Train Anonymous 

Hazel Ingram 
The Hazing of Valiant Anonymous 

Anne Floreth 

A Set of Turquoise Thomas Bailey Aldrich 

Clara Lane 
When the Fleet Goes By Mary Synon 

Alma Harmel 
On Friday afternoon, April 23, at 4:15, the interme- 
diate girls of the Expression Department gave a very de- 
lightful program. 

Page Sixteen 



^^t College (Jlreetings! 



Miss Gleckler was a judge at the declamatory con- 
test of Whipple Academy on Tuesday evening, March 29. 

Miss Corinne Hughes went to Meredosia Monday, 
April 12, to coach nine students for a declamatory con- 
test. Miss Hughes reports a very unique and profitable 
day. 

Miss Shaw was a judge for a local declamatory con- 
test in Chapin Friday night, April 16. 

Miss Gleckler read "The Wine Press," a tale of war 
by Alfred Noyes, before the College Hill Club on April 26. 

The Wesley Mathers declamatory contest is to be 
held on Saturday evening, May 1st. It is hoped that there 
will be as great interest in this as there was in the essay 
contest. 

Miss Corinne Hughes will give for her senior recital 
an original conception of J. Hartley Manner's novel, "Peg 
o' My Heart," on Wednesday, May 19, at 4:15 o'clock. 
This is not the play, but Miss Hughes's own dramatization 
of the novel. 



ART NOTES. 

The exhibition of pictures by C(jntemporary American 
painters which has just clased was one of the most suc- 
cessful events that has ever been brought on the Artist''^: 
Course. 

There were 2 887 visitors at the exhibition during its 
two weeks showing, and every one will hold as his own 
permanent possession the memory of some very good 
pictures. 

On March 31, Miss Knopf gave a talk about the pic- 
tures to the High School at the regular chapel, later giving 
another talk to the pupils of the eighth grade. 

Genevieve Spiece and Ruth Patton have recently en- 
rolled in classes. 

Page Seventeen 




Wbt College ^vtttinQH 




Margaret Harris, Catherine Erixson, Grace Reavis, 
Kathryn Glascock and Romaine Loar have posed for the 
sketch class during the past month. 



ANTIGONE. 

The Classical Club of Jacksonville will present its 
second annual Greek play, May 18, at 4 p. m. The play 
will be given this year on the Woman's College campus. 
The members of the cast have been chosen from students 
of Illinois College, the chorus from the Woman's College, 
and most of the attendants from Jacksonville high school. 
Of the cast Mr. Caldwell and Miss Scheibel will be remem- 
bered for their excellent work last year in "Electra." 
The part of Coryphaeus will be taken this year by Miss 
Romaine Loar. The members of the chorus are Misses 
Alexander, Allen, Applebee, Bigger, Cox, Franchen, 
Goldsmith, Onken, Osburn, Robb, Spencer, Towle, Wil- 
kinson, Wesphal, and Wylder. 

The music written for the Antigone by Mendelsohhn 
will be used. Mr. Stearns is arranging the music and di- 
recting the chorus in the choral odes. Miss Julia Herren 
of Chicago has charge of the choral evolutions. 

The costumes and staging- have been made as nearly 
historically correct as possible. In accordance with the 
ancient Greek custom the play will be given in daylight 
and in the open air. The modern elevated stage is not 
used but an orchestra circle on the level ground, forty 
feet in diameter. The back scene represents the front of 
the royal palace of Thebes. By a convention of the Greek 
stage, persons supposed to come from the town or har- 
bor enter at the spectator's right. Those from the coun- 
try at the left. 

In connection with this production, it is interesting 
to note that the Woman's Peace Party has turned to the 
Greek drama in order to present their cause as graphi- 

Page Eighteen 




tBi)t College (^reetingg 




cally and beautifully as possible. For twenty weeks the 
Little Theatre Company of Chicago will travel about the 
country presenting Euripides' "Trojan Women" in order 
to bring the horrors of warfare as vividly as possible be- 
fore the people of today. 



>i9 



JUNIOR JOURNAL. 



Did you hear it? 
Twenty-four. That 
meant the Juniors who 
returned last fall 
Twenty-four girls full 
of enthusiasm for their 
college and their class. 



JUNIORS 

® ^ 



.< 









^j', ^Jk 

>> 



RUN 



>^ 



They started to use 
their spirit on an an- 
nual. No one who was 
not a Junior, or a Jun- 
ior class officer, will 
ever know how many 
hours were spent in trying literally to squeeze out an llli- 
woco staff that would come within the regulations. En- 
thusiasm, turned by necessity from literary pursuits, was 
used in helping make the Lake Mantanzas trip the success 
it was, and in giving a reception to the Freshmen. An 
account of the Juniors would be incomplete without the 
name of Miss Jennie Anderson, who has always found 
time to help her class in whatever it has undertaken. A 
delightful party given by Miss Anderson to the Juniors at 
Thanksgiving time was followed closely by the Junior- 
Senior dinner at Colonial Inn. 

The Juniors had a chance to show their class spirit 
at the essay contest, and they claim they ought to be 
proud of themselves. Did they not come off with flying 
banners and two prizes? 

Page Nineteen 




^i)e CoQege ({lreeting£( 



The class of 1916 were sure that they had a really 
true sister class after a very greatly enjoyed evening 
spent with the Freshmen. A better proof of the loyalty 
of the class of 1918 could not be asked for. 

No Junior at 1. W. C. would feel that her life was 
complete without the Senior-Junior reception, and it is 
safe to say that there is not a Junior who will ever forget 
the event looked forward to for months. 

It may be that the college has heard of a Junior bas- 
ketball team. Indeed there is one. The Juniors expect 
to win the tournament, too — next year, if not this. 

This much has the class of 1916 accomplished, but 
moreover it has well-grounded hopes for a good showing 
on Field Day, and for a class of twenty girls, next fall, to 
sing 

Nineteen, Nineteen Sixteen, 
Hurrah, comrades, for our class. 



SOPHOMORES. 

The opening of school 
last fall saw the major- 
ity of the class of '1 7 
back at I. W. C. with its 
well known enthusiasm 
and loyalty. We've 
been much in evidence 
all year, especially at 
the time of the Matan- 
zas mystery. Everyone 
knew something was in 
the air when we all ap- 
peared in chapel in our 
red and white, wearing such mottos as "Blow Your Horn, 
Kid," and "1 Look Good to Me." All was excitement 
until at the College Sing the next night, by general vote, 
it was decided that Barbara Weber was the prettiest, Mary 




Page Twenty 



^iit College dlreetingsi 




Harrison the wittiest, and Marie Louise Witbeck "the one 
we love best." 

We were delighted to hear that Miss McLaughlin was 
to be our Sophomore class officer. The class election was 
soon held, when Mary Hanison was elected president, Jo- 
hanna Onken, vice-president, Genevieve Dague, secre- 
tary, and Pauline Herrmann, treasurer. The Sophomores 
have been well represented in all college activities, having 
representatives on the Students' Council, the Athletic 
Staff, the Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, and many other organiza- 
tions. 

On one of the Thursday stunt nights, with a fitting 
program of essays and orations, we presented our new 
red and white 1917 banner. Miss McLaughlin entertained 
the class at a delightful informal party in Expression Hall, 
when we had fun making up songs and yells for the es- 
say contest. 

January 1 6th was the night of the essay contest be- 
tween the Juniors and Sophomores. We had four con- 
testants — Winifred Robison, Marjorie Brown, Grace Hel- 
ler and Edith Sawyer. We could hardly wait to sing "Yip 
for 17," "Poor 16," "On, On, Sophomores," and the 
rest of our "gingerie" songs and yells. We did not win 
either of the prizes but we had fun and we are looking 
forward to next year. 

This spring we have been interested in basketball. We 
began by beating the Freshmen and the team has done 
good work in the tournament. With spring have come 
picnics, also. Our president started the fashion by en- 
tertaining the class at a breakfast at Nichols' Park. After 
walking two and a half miles those bacon-and-egg sand- 
wiches sure did taste good. 

At the party that we gave the Seniors some of us re- 
turned to our girlhood and "boyhood" days at the dis- 
trict school, and guests and all "saw themselves as oth- 
ers saw them" when their baby pictures were thrown on 
the screen. 



Page Twenty-one 



V!^\)t College (flreetinss; 



There are only a few more weeks for us to beSopho- 
mores so we are going" to make the most of them in get- 
ting ready to be the "peppy" class of '17 when we are 
Juniors that we have been as Freshmen and Sophomores. 

In the College Song Contest, Winifred Robison was 
awarded first prize by the faculty committee of judges, 
thus bringing honor to her class. 




A SURVEY. 

Last September a 
group of ununited and 
disorganized Freshmen 
entered 1. W. C. Some 
of them came because 
they were sent, some 
cause it was what oth- 
ers were doing, and 
some because they 
wanted a taste of real 
college life — wanted it 
so badly that nothing 
could have kept them 
away. The first few weeks we were very much awed by 
the strangeness of our new surroundings. We trembled 
before the mighty looking Senior and scringed under the 
sarcastic remarks of the Sophomore. It is to those de- 
Hghtful people — the Juniors — that we owe our salvation, 
for they took us under their wing and carried us safely 
over that "new feeling" that threatened to take all the 
pleasure from our college life. 

No matter with what views and purposes we came, 
we believe they have been changed. Before, we saw 
the individual rather than the community; we thought 
of ourselves as an oracle to be consulted on all subjects, 
and we were sure that the world could not be run without 
us. In this Freshman year we have learned how insignifi- 

Page Twenty-two , j 



(E^te College (greetings; 




cant we are alone, but yet we have gained some concep- 
tion of what an important unit we are in the organization 
of college life. We have a great deal more respect for the 
ideas of others and we hope more true respect for our 
own. 

It is with pleasure that we look back over the year. 
It is not the pleasure of contentment or even satisfaction, 
but rather of the little joys and delights, the associations 
and friendships, and the words and the duties that we 
treasure as our reminiscences. 

For the future we can have only one desire — to make 
it better than the past. Let us each have a determination 
to go into the future as we have gone into our college ac- 
tivities — to win. Let the ideals and hopes of the Fresh- 
man class be those of next year's Sophomore class. With 
an ever-increasing conception of life and broadening of 
view, let us come back next fall determined upon some 
particular goal, giving our support to every college ac- 
tivity, and with a desire to make our Alma Mater larger 
and finer by our having been a part of it. 
The year is coming to an end. 
Now backward. Freshmen, let us turn! 
What have we said, our help to lend? 
What have we done, our joys to earn? 
May all these memories, ever dear. 
Be thoughts to tre